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(Some Archaeologist)   Farkette's longtime excavation now has a functioning website   (boncuklu.org ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Boncuklu, University of Liverpool, excavations, University of Queensland  
•       •       •

1101 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 05 Aug 2013 at 1:12 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



49 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

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2013-08-05 11:49:33 AM  
Neat
 
2013-08-05 11:57:56 AM  
I was under the impression that seeing a Farkette's excavation on a website wasn't anything new...

/wait... that's not what we're talking about, is it?
 
2013-08-05 11:59:37 AM  
That's pretty cool...and interesting.
 
2013-08-05 12:09:51 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com

Can you dig it?

/Very cool.
 
2013-08-05 12:10:03 PM  
Very cool.
 
2013-08-05 12:15:29 PM  
Fantastic!!
 
2013-08-05 12:17:24 PM  
ts2.mm.bing.net
 
2013-08-05 12:17:44 PM  
jekxrb?
 
2013-08-05 12:19:57 PM  
I can dig it.
 
2013-08-05 12:21:41 PM  
"Shell Bead Concentration"
Focus... Focus...
 
2013-08-05 12:23:01 PM  
Live Feed

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-05 12:24:57 PM  
is that what they're calling it these days?
 
2013-08-05 12:34:13 PM  
There are no women on the internet.


it is known
 
2013-08-05 12:40:44 PM  
That's fantastic.  It looks like interesting work.
 
2013-08-05 12:55:53 PM  
Excellent!  Congratulations.
 
2013-08-05 01:15:53 PM  
Thanks for looking!

This is the first year I haven't been in the field.  (Coincidentally?) This is the first year we've had a website. It's great to be able to keep up with the finds as they are discovered (if not processed or analyzed).  I hope eveyone loves their job as much as I love mine!

/subette
 
2013-08-05 01:21:13 PM  
Very awesome.
 
2013-08-05 01:36:38 PM  
I thought she was banned.
 
2013-08-05 01:40:27 PM  

Agarista:  I hope eveyone loves their job as much as I love mine!



It really is the greatest job in the world, isn't it?
 
2013-08-05 01:42:46 PM  
You make me wish I had followed that whim that I had in college to go into archaeology. So cool.
 
2013-08-05 01:45:15 PM  

cgraves67: You make me wish I had followed that whim that I had in college to go into archaeology. So cool.


"X" never, ever marks the spot.
 
2013-08-05 01:46:41 PM  
Join us!  Or send an e-mail to the nearest university that has an archaeology program and ask if you can join them for a few days on a dig.They'll show you everything you need to know, and will probably have extra tools lying about.  Everyone loves free labor :D
 
2013-08-05 01:55:01 PM  
Here are some places to check for fieldwork opportunities:

http://www.archaeological.org/fieldwork
 
2013-08-05 01:56:42 PM  
snark aside, this is awesome. one could almost call it an... ur-city.
 
2013-08-05 02:05:07 PM  
A few years ago, we had T-shirts made that said "smaller, older, better"  as most people who have heard of anything Neolithic in Anatolia know Çatalhöyük or Göbekli tepe.  As we are 9km from the former, we get compared a lot, and have nowhere near the funding they do.
 
2013-08-05 02:44:52 PM  
Is it fearsome?  And on Magnolia Boulevard?
 
2013-08-05 02:45:14 PM  
Nice try, subby. But I've learned through many religious threads that the earth is only 6000 years old.

/Very neat! Thank you for sharing! Sending the link to my nerdy wife :)
 
2013-08-05 02:47:52 PM  

Agarista: A few years ago, we had T-shirts made that said "smaller, older, better"  as most people who have heard of anything Neolithic in Anatolia know Çatalhöyük or Göbekli tepe.  As we are 9km from the former, we get compared a lot, and have nowhere near the funding they do.


I thought someone else might have submitted this. Last I heard from her she was on a dig in Greece. I think it's cool that there is more than farkette in the field. May I email you with some questions about fieldwork? EIP
 
2013-08-05 02:49:21 PM  
I can dig it, he can dig it, she can dig it, we can dig it, they can dig it, you can dig it
Oh, let's dig it. Can you dig it, baby?

Seriously, that's cool, though.
 
2013-08-05 03:16:36 PM  
Here's a philosophical question for you... how old does a cemetery have to be where it's considered "archaelogy," and not just "digging up some bones?"

I need to know for, you know, science.

/but seriously, good for you.
 
2013-08-05 03:56:40 PM  

hp6sa: Here's a philosophical question for you... how old does a cemetery have to be where it's considered "archaelogy," and not just "digging up some bones?"

I need to know for, you know, science.

/but seriously, good for you.


These days, archaeologists avoid digging up cemeteries if at all possible.  We really don't learn much from digging up cemeteries, so we only do it if the area is slated for construction or, in some other way, "at risk."

As a general rule, anything less than 50 years old is definitely not archaeology, so if you're digging up a recent grave, it is grave robbing.   Older than that, it gets into a gray area.
 
2013-08-05 04:21:05 PM  
Yawn...keep us posted if you find another piece of the crucifix. You know...the original.

I keed.
 
2013-08-05 05:01:19 PM  
You lost me at the suggestion in your profile that I read 50 books.  Woman, if I had a choice between reading 50 books including the required fiction I already read in AP & other English classes back in the day or burying myself alive, you'll be digging ME up.  Just don't wait 10,500 years.  I can only hold my breath for, like, 48 seconds.
 
2013-08-05 05:56:48 PM  

Agarista: Thanks for looking!

This is the first year I haven't been in the field.  (Coincidentally?) This is the first year we've had a website. It's great to be able to keep up with the finds as they are discovered (if not processed or analyzed).  I hope eveyone loves their job as much as I love mine!

/subette


1) awesome and thanks for sharing
2) what the hell are the holes in the floors?
I tried to skim to find the answer but just  gave up.
 
2013-08-05 06:28:45 PM  
longtime excavation with a functioning website?, you just described innumerable basement dwellers right there.

Good luck on your archeology dig, sounds like good science and a great project
 
2013-08-05 06:45:45 PM  

Agarista: Thanks for looking!

This is the first year I haven't been in the field.  (Coincidentally?) This is the first year we've had a website. It's great to be able to keep up with the finds as they are discovered (if not processed or analyzed).  I hope eveyone loves their job as much as I love mine!

/subette


Congrats Subby,
 
2013-08-05 07:03:20 PM  

FloydA: hp6sa: Here's a philosophical question for you... how old does a cemetery have to be where it's considered "archaelogy," and not just "digging up some bones?"

I need to know for, you know, science.

/but seriously, good for you.

These days, archaeologists avoid digging up cemeteries if at all possible.  We really don't learn much from digging up cemeteries, so we only do it if the area is slated for construction or, in some other way, "at risk."

As a general rule, anything less than 50 years old is definitely not archaeology, so if you're digging up a recent grave, it is grave robbing.   Older than that, it gets into a gray area.


Smithsonian had an article recently about a graveyard in CT that had a vampire burial.
 
2013-08-05 07:39:37 PM  
This is very, very cool!!
 
2013-08-05 08:02:02 PM  

namatad: Agarista: Thanks for looking!

This is the first year I haven't been in the field.  (Coincidentally?) This is the first year we've had a website. It's great to be able to keep up with the finds as they are discovered (if not processed or analyzed).  I hope eveyone loves their job as much as I love mine!

/subette

1) awesome and thanks for sharing
2) what the hell are the holes in the floors?
I tried to skim to find the answer but just  gave up.


1)  :D

2) many of the holes in the floors used to be home to posts (holding up roof or random ritual post-type thang) or stake-holes (hold up wattle-and-daub temporary wall or roof-y-type thangs, or even hold up stone pots over hearth). Unfortunately, most of the smalish holes you see are the results of gopherage (archaeologists farkING HATE gophers).  The largest holes in the floors were likely intended as burials, as during the Neolithic in Anatolia (and much of the Near East) loved family members were buried underneath house floors.  It was a good excuse to re-plaster, and also a nice way of keeping gramma nearby.
 
2013-08-05 08:06:14 PM  

Nana's Vibrator: You lost me at the suggestion in your profile that I read 50 books.  Woman, if I had a choice between reading 50 books including the required fiction I already read in AP & other English classes back in the day or burying myself alive, you'll be digging ME up.  Just don't wait 10,500 years.  I can only hold my breath for, like, 48 seconds.


Reading should never be required.  Fiction is an intangible dream these days.  Enjoy it while you can.

If reading is a chore, then it's a good thing we aren't friends  ;)
 
2013-08-05 10:26:43 PM  

Agarista: Thanks for looking!

This is the first year I haven't been in the field.  (Coincidentally?) This is the first year we've had a website. It's great to be able to keep up with the finds as they are discovered (if not processed or analyzed).  I hope eveyone loves their job as much as I love mine!

/subette



*click profile*


SWOON!

 
2013-08-05 11:04:58 PM  
Nice site, would be more convincing with "NEWSMAX" links in the sidebar.
 
2013-08-05 11:38:15 PM  
Website is 'way cool. Congrats!
Hope you can get back on the field and enjoy the dig.

/did a little work in the Sinai twenty years ago. Would love to go back *sigh*
 
2013-08-06 04:55:46 AM  

Agarista: 2) many of the holes in the floors used to be home to posts (holding up roof or random ritual post-type thang) or stake-holes (hold up wattle-and-daub temporary wall or roof-y-type thangs, or even hold up stone pots over hearth). Unfortunately, most of the smalish holes you see are the results of gopherage (archaeologists farkING HATE gophers).The largest holes in the floors were likely intended as burials, as during the Neolithic in Anatolia (and much of the Near East) loved family members were buried underneath house floors.  It was a good excuse to re-plaster, and also a nice way of keeping gramma nearby.


1) DOH! Post holes are so obvious as soon as you say it.
2) I read about the burying the dead under the house and .... shudder ....
3) Bwahahahahahahaahahahahahah I will always think of Caddyshack whenever I read about archaeologists now!!!

you win!
 
2013-08-06 10:00:52 AM  

namatad: Agarista: 2) many of the holes in the floors used to be home to posts (holding up roof or random ritual post-type thang) or stake-holes (hold up wattle-and-daub temporary wall or roof-y-type thangs, or even hold up stone pots over hearth). Unfortunately, most of the smalish holes you see are the results of gopherage (archaeologists farkING HATE gophers).The largest holes in the floors were likely intended as burials, as during the Neolithic in Anatolia (and much of the Near East) loved family members were buried underneath house floors.  It was a good excuse to re-plaster, and also a nice way of keeping gramma nearby.

1) DOH! Post holes are so obvious as soon as you say it.
2) I read about the burying the dead under the house and .... shudder ....
3) Bwahahahahahahaahahahahahah I will always think of Caddyshack whenever I read about archaeologists now!!!

you win!


THANKS !!!
 
2013-08-06 12:11:10 PM  
This thread needs more Bevets.
 
2013-08-06 04:15:12 PM  

Agarista: Join us!  Or send an e-mail to the nearest university that has an archaeology program and ask if you can join them for a few days on a dig.They'll show you everything you need to know, and will probably have extra tools lying about.  Everyone loves free labor :D


I live in Izmir, my mom in Canakkale. Turkey is such an amazing place for archeological discovery! And so much of it only partially unearthed because of lack of funding.  Antandros, Alexandria Troas...two amazing places with history to tell.
 
2013-08-06 05:10:12 PM  

canavar: Agarista: Join us!  Or send an e-mail to the nearest university that has an archaeology program and ask if you can join them for a few days on a dig.They'll show you everything you need to know, and will probably have extra tools lying about.  Everyone loves free labor :D

I live in Izmir, my mom in Canakkale. Turkey is such an amazing place for archeological discovery! And so much of it only partially unearthed because of lack of funding.  Antandros, Alexandria Troas...two amazing places with history to tell.


Gerçekten mi?  Bnm ilk kazı Urla'da oldu.  Birazdan geri taşiniyom İstanbul'a
 
2013-08-06 09:04:03 PM  
By Zahi's Big Nose! What a find!
 
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