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(Wimp)   A quick lesson on how to impress the ladies with fake musical skills   (wimp.com) divider line 23
    More: Amusing, lessons  
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4318 clicks; posted to Video » on 04 Aug 2013 at 7:56 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-04 06:31:34 PM
Bobby McFerrin awesomely demonstrates why this works in this video.
 
2013-08-04 06:38:01 PM
Get more practice on the skin flute?
 
2013-08-04 06:46:33 PM

Charlie Freak: Bobby McFerrin awesomely demonstrates why this works in this video.


No, he just demonstrates it.  Doesn't explain why it works.  Not that it isn't cool.  The pentatonic scale may well be the world's most pervasive meme.
 
2013-08-04 07:02:00 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Charlie Freak: Bobby McFerrin awesomely demonstrates why this works in this video.

No, he just demonstrates it.  Doesn't explain why it works.  Not that it isn't cool.  The pentatonic scale may well be the world's most pervasive meme.


How the audience anticipates and reacts during Bobby's video is analogous as to why the piano dude video is somewhat tolerable, while not even remotely approaching good technique or composition. Okay, it doesn't get into why, but both effectively demonstrate the effectiveness of playing pentatonics.
 
2013-08-04 07:10:52 PM

Charlie Freak: Benevolent Misanthrope: Charlie Freak: Bobby McFerrin awesomely demonstrates why this works in this video.

No, he just demonstrates it.  Doesn't explain why it works.  Not that it isn't cool.  The pentatonic scale may well be the world's most pervasive meme.

How the audience anticipates and reacts during Bobby's video is analogous as to why the piano dude video is somewhat tolerable, while not even remotely approaching good technique or composition. Okay, it doesn't get into why, but both effectively demonstrate the effectiveness of playing pentatonics.


Sure, no argument here.  I've been researching off and on for the last little bit, though, to see if the neuroscientists in that panel ever wrote anything about why it's so pervasive.  Ever since I did my Bachelor's in Music, I've been fascinated by the universality of the pentatonic scale.  It has to do with the mathematical relatioships of the relative frequencies, of course, but I've never found anything that says exactly why.  Not surprising, really, since the brain is pretty-much a mystery, but it's something I let the busy part of my brain play with from time to time.
 
2013-08-04 07:12:25 PM
cdn.overclock.net
 
2013-08-04 07:51:20 PM
I deal with the pentatonic scale every day.
 
2013-08-04 10:57:33 PM
as an idiot who loves battery operated noise making toys and Casio keyboards, this video will up my game incredibly. thank you subby.
 
2013-08-04 11:02:13 PM
Benevolent Misanthrope:
Sure, no argument here.  I've been researching off and on for the last little bit, though, to see if the neuroscientists in that panel ever wrote anything about why it's so pervasive.  Ever since I did my Bachelor's in Music, I've been fascinated by the universality of the pentatonic scale.  It has to do with the mathematical relatioships of the relative frequencies, of course, but I've never found anything that says exactly why.  Not surprising, really, since the brain is pretty-much a mystery, but it's something I let the busy part of my brain play with from time to time.

i had an ethnomusicology class back in my university days and the prevailing thing they were saying was that it's socialized
for example, music in minor keys sounds sad because from birth we always hear it in conjunction with sad things.
these studies were compared against people who lived in places with predominately different scales (before western music was widely spread either) like in indonesia. to us the gamelan sounds alien but to them it might as well be britney spears.

the prevalance of pentatonic maybe just be that since it's the natural sequence of ratios that various cultures just used it at first and they got accustomed to it so it stuck rather than more unusual ratios and tunings. and a lot of music is handed down so for example it's prevalance in blues and country can be traced to bluegrass and to scottish/irish roots of that for example

i have seen another theory since then that it's related to speech and that we use certain intervals when speaking to subconsciously show emotion, and that the minor 3rd is what differentates sad vs happy speech, although i think it's possible this isn't mutually exclusive with the other theory

anyway it's a fascinating subject for sure
 
2013-08-04 11:42:00 PM

spesimen: Benevolent Misanthrope:
Sure, no argument here.  I've been researching off and on for the last little bit, though, to see if the neuroscientists in that panel ever wrote anything about why it's so pervasive.  Ever since I did my Bachelor's in Music, I've been fascinated by the universality of the pentatonic scale.  It has to do with the mathematical relatioships of the relative frequencies, of course, but I've never found anything that says exactly why.  Not surprising, really, since the brain is pretty-much a mystery, but it's something I let the busy part of my brain play with from time to time.

i had an ethnomusicology class back in my university days and the prevailing thing they were saying was that it's socialized
for example, music in minor keys sounds sad because from birth we always hear it in conjunction with sad things.
these studies were compared against people who lived in places with predominately different scales (before western music was widely spread either) like in indonesia. to us the gamelan sounds alien but to them it might as well be britney spears.

the prevalance of pentatonic maybe just be that since it's the natural sequence of ratios that various cultures just used it at first and they got accustomed to it so it stuck rather than more unusual ratios and tunings. and a lot of music is handed down so for example it's prevalance in blues and country can be traced to bluegrass and to scottish/irish roots of that for example

i have seen another theory since then that it's related to speech and that we use certain intervals when speaking to subconsciously show emotion, and that the minor 3rd is what differentates sad vs happy speech, although i think it's possible this isn't mutually exclusive with the other theory

anyway it's a fascinating subject for sure


That's the kind of thing that makes me think the pentatonic scale is hard-wired into our brains, as a set of mathematical ratios and inter-relationships.  Even small children know it.  I wonder if it has something to do with the frequencies at which neurons fire or atoms spin or something.
 
2013-08-04 11:56:42 PM
I do the same thing when improvising, except I use the white keys. But I also have moderate piano skills, so...
 
2013-08-05 12:03:24 AM
Guitar is easier. Simple barre chords and buttload of distortion.
 
2013-08-05 12:43:01 AM
And wind chimes are pentatonic.

/Annoying as fark all wind chimes.
 
2013-08-05 05:24:12 AM

Solty Dog: Guitar is easier. Simple barre chords and buttload of distortion.




Don't use a pick.
 
2013-08-05 07:01:18 AM
i1.ytimg.com

will I still impress the ladies if it's on a giant keyboard?
createdigitalmusic.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Yu62StlsMY
 
2013-08-05 09:10:34 AM
I did a rendition of "Beautiful Boy" at a concert a couple of weeks ago.  It was in G, but then I just played it in F# and had a lot more fun with it.

Pentatonic glissandos for the win!
 
2013-08-05 09:45:36 AM

StoPPeRmobile: Solty Dog: Guitar is easier. Simple barre chords and buttload of distortion.

Don't use a pick.


Well there goes my whole technique...

/it's so much easier to mask poor fretting and bad chord shifts when it's all muted with finger picking...
 
2013-08-05 11:06:17 AM
I play your mom's pentatonic scale.  She always says I hit the right notes.
 
2013-08-05 12:24:08 PM

spesimen: Benevolent Misanthrope:
Sure, no argument here.  I've been researching off and on for the last little bit, though, to see if the neuroscientists in that panel ever wrote anything about why it's so pervasive.  Ever since I did my Bachelor's in Music, I've been fascinated by the universality of the pentatonic scale.  It has to do with the mathematical relatioships of the relative frequencies, of course, but I've never found anything that says exactly why.  Not surprising, really, since the brain is pretty-much a mystery, but it's something I let the busy part of my brain play with from time to time.

i had an ethnomusicology class back in my university days and the prevailing thing they were saying was that it's socialized
for example, music in minor keys sounds sad because from birth we always hear it in conjunction with sad things.
these studies were compared against people who lived in places with predominately different scales (before western music was widely spread either) like in indonesia. to us the gamelan sounds alien but to them it might as well be britney spears.

the prevalance of pentatonic maybe just be that since it's the natural sequence of ratios that various cultures just used it at first and they got accustomed to it so it stuck rather than more unusual ratios and tunings. and a lot of music is handed down so for example it's prevalance in blues and country can be traced to bluegrass and to scottish/irish roots of that for example

i have seen another theory since then that it's related to speech and that we use certain intervals when speaking to subconsciously show emotion, and that the minor 3rd is what differentates sad vs happy speech, although i think it's possible this isn't mutually exclusive with the other theory

anyway it's a fascinating subject for sure


If you think of the different notes as numbers on a clock, the pentatonic scale is what you get when you try to evenly distribute five notes.  The diatonic scale and its various modes are the result of trying to evenly place seven numbers over twelve.  The harmonic minor scale is the next most even distribution of seven notes.
 
2013-08-05 12:47:32 PM

highrye: spesimen: Benevolent Misanthrope:
Sure, no argument here.  I've been researching off and on for the last little bit, though, to see if the neuroscientists in that panel ever wrote anything about why it's so pervasive.  Ever since I did my Bachelor's in Music, I've been fascinated by the universality of the pentatonic scale.  It has to do with the mathematical relatioships of the relative frequencies, of course, but I've never found anything that says exactly why.  Not surprising, really, since the brain is pretty-much a mystery, but it's something I let the busy part of my brain play with from time to time.

i had an ethnomusicology class back in my university days and the prevailing thing they were saying was that it's socialized
for example, music in minor keys sounds sad because from birth we always hear it in conjunction with sad things.
these studies were compared against people who lived in places with predominately different scales (before western music was widely spread either) like in indonesia. to us the gamelan sounds alien but to them it might as well be britney spears.

the prevalance of pentatonic maybe just be that since it's the natural sequence of ratios that various cultures just used it at first and they got accustomed to it so it stuck rather than more unusual ratios and tunings. and a lot of music is handed down so for example it's prevalance in blues and country can be traced to bluegrass and to scottish/irish roots of that for example

i have seen another theory since then that it's related to speech and that we use certain intervals when speaking to subconsciously show emotion, and that the minor 3rd is what differentates sad vs happy speech, although i think it's possible this isn't mutually exclusive with the other theory

anyway it's a fascinating subject for sure

If you think of the different notes as numbers on a clock, the pentatonic scale is what you get when you try to evenly distribute five notes.  The diatonic scale and its various ...




I always thought it was this.
singbliss.files.wordpress.com

Math!
 
2013-08-05 01:23:42 PM

Charlie Freak: Bobby McFerrin awesomely demonstrates why this works in this video.


That was cool.
 
2013-08-05 05:58:09 PM
"bit of an oriental feel, this one."
 
2013-08-05 08:49:04 PM

boobietastles: I play your mom's pentatonic scale.  She always says I hit the right notes.


I heard you love to play in A minor. :P
 
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