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(Yahoo)   Perfessor say the kidzz no longger needs to learn the spelling and that grammarica stuff because of ur phones is smart enuff   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 19
    More: Dumbass, educational technology, multiplication tables, Newcastle University  
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4230 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Aug 2013 at 6:27 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-04 06:36:22 PM
4 votes:
I've noticed it is a lot faster to sort through a stack of applications/resumes in the last ten years or so.
2013-08-04 08:10:19 PM
2 votes:
For those who consider English spelling too random and difficult, consider Japanese. There are multiple, correct ways of writing pretty much everything.

Sushi:

すし (plain syllabic)
スシ (different plain syllabic, more forceful)
寿司 (most common)
壽司 (same as above, but using traditional characters; more hoity-toity)
鮨 (Single character, emphasizing and chosen for its relation to 酢, vinegar)
鮨 (Single character, emphasizing the ageing process)

"To take"

取る (something)
撮る (a picture)
採る (a fruit from a tree)
捕る (a living thing under confinement)
執る (firmly, not letting go)
摂る (nutrition)
獲る (forcefully)
盗る (illegally, the property of another)

All the above are pronounced the same way: toru, because it's the same basic verb.

Compound verbs

Example: 陥れる (Otoshii・reru; to plunge, to drive in)
or: 落とし入れる (Same word, but spelled with its component parts: Otosu; to let go, to drop, and ireru; to insert)

Inflection deletion

Most people have heard of yaki-tori. It comes from "roasted fowl". The root word, yaku, is written 焼く. In its connective form: 焼き (yaki). So, most properly, one should write yaki tori as 焼き鳥, but the き inflection is usually understood and therefore deleted: 焼鳥.

There's even more crazy shiat, but that's a good primer.

Fun language, eh?
2013-08-04 07:30:10 PM
2 votes:
Typos on a message board are one thing.  They're nothing more than a result of being careless, and there is no reason to expect people to put some great quantity of care into their online goofing off.  We can usually make sense of what was written, though, because our minds correct the errors (sometimes without us even noticing).  We can do this because we know the correct way to write.

Grammar is even more important than spelling.  It's nice to be able to communicate complicated ideas.  Making a particularly bad grammatical error at a critical time can make a sentence unclear or, worse, make it seem as if it means something it was not intended to mean.  I run into this problem all the time when I have to attempt to read stuff written by Chinese colleagues (though they tend to be better with written English than most of the American and Canadian undergrads I have encountered).  More than once, a misconception brought on by a grammatical error has led to me spending over a day wrestling with an idea that turned out to be completely wrong.


While it's supposedly a myth that kids are getting dumber and dumber, it certainly seems to me that their  writing is getting worse and worse.  A few semesters as a teaching assistant for a college class with essays, compared with my memories of high school, taught me that.  It seems plausible, too.  When I was young, I wrote everything by hand.  The only time I used a computer in high school was in programming class.  I wrote my college applications with a typewriter.  I didn't use technology as a crutch; I had to fix my writing on my own.  Today, kids don't write anything.  Saying that they'll be just fine without learning to write is like saying I can look like Arnold Schwarzenegger without ever going to the gym.

The article mentions calculators, too.  Kids need to be banned from using those.  Every time I run across a college kid who can't do the kind of arithmetic I mastered in fourth grade, I die a little inside.
2013-08-04 06:36:33 PM
2 votes:
A world where every novel reads like a Damn You Autocorrect entry is not one in which I am wont to live.
2013-08-04 09:59:27 PM
1 votes:

UsikFark: "Standardized" English is not really a thing, the language changes as it goes along. Accepted spellings and even the accepted way to shape the letters of our alphabet have changed pretty dramatically. Why not expect things to change further?


All languages evolve. Standardization just slows that process down, making it possible to achieve a greater degree of uniformity/intelligibility over time and space. It's the reason the average educated English speaker wouldn't have much trouble with Shakespeare, but would probably need specialized training to go much further back than that.
2013-08-04 09:44:43 PM
1 votes:
I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.
2013-08-04 09:23:57 PM
1 votes:

UsikFark: "Standardized" English is not really a thing, the language changes as it goes along. Accepted spellings and even the accepted way to shape the letters of our alphabet have changed pretty dramatically. Why not expect things to change further?


Get the fark out of here with your descriptive linguistics. We're all about prescribing proper grammar and spelling up in this biatch.
2013-08-04 08:51:37 PM
1 votes:

optional: Every time I hear a professor spout off like this, and realize that he probably gets tenure and will continue to get paid to be a moron, I die a little inside.

Colleges are scams.


But if the colleges are scams, and businesses require colleges degrees for professionals, then...

i.imgur.com
2013-08-04 08:16:07 PM
1 votes:

Snarfangel: hitlersbrain: Actually, spelling is so farked up that "learning" it is probably bad for a kids brain anyway. There's more important stuff to learn, like critical thinking, math and science.

The funny thing is, many of the people apparently baffled by the English system of measurements are just fine with the English system of spelling and grammar, which may I point out is a damn sight more confusing.

/Nothing against the metric system, which was state-of-the-art for the 18th century, but can we fix the most confusing spelling and grammar rules, too? Though, through, cough, rough, plough, ought, borough -- come on, you are going to give little kids an aneurysm.


The metric system is more mathematically precise than the Standard English system. It makes calculations much simpler when dealing with stress forces, chemicals, weights, diameters etc. Any engineer worth a damn is going to do all the work in Metric.

Of course, that means the Germans and the Japanese tend to shoehorn their engine compartments like the inside of a Piano Makers toolbox.

www.phoenixmasonry.org
2013-08-04 07:48:46 PM
1 votes:

werty789: The English language needs an overhaul. Modern English is a cobbled together language made up of bits and pieces of many languages. Spelling English is difficult because there are no set rules. English spelling rules all go something like this: Rule, and now the exceptions. I was able to spell in my High School German class better than my English class because all the German spelling followed the rules.


English is far from unique in this regard.
2013-08-04 07:15:25 PM
1 votes:

werty789: The English language needs an overhaul. Modern English is a cobbled together language made up of bits and pieces of many languages. Spelling English is difficult because there are no set rules. English spelling rules all go something like this: Rule, and now the exceptions. I was able to spell in my High School German class better than my English class because all the German spelling followed the rules.


Good idea. You get right on that; I'll be over here laughing. I had the same idea when I was taking German in High School. I have a theory about German teachers that involves them all telling their students about how superior German spelling is to English spelling. What they fail to mention is the problem with compound nouns.
2013-08-04 07:15:17 PM
1 votes:
seriously, if they're going to start actively promoting feudalism, just say it.
2013-08-04 07:03:07 PM
1 votes:
This being a Yahoo reprint of a Daily Caller retread of a Daily Mail article, I'm going to guess that they took what the professor is actually advocating for (and which socioeconomic stratum he's trying to help), ran it through their bowels a few times, picked out the good bits and threw them away, then smeared the rest on a sheet of butcher paper and handed it in to their editor, who repeated the process before stuffing the wet, smelly wad into the "Computer Hole" their IT folks set up to accept their articles.

I could be wrong, though.
2013-08-04 07:01:09 PM
1 votes:
The English language needs an overhaul. Modern English is a cobbled together language made up of bits and pieces of many languages. Spelling English is difficult because there are no set rules. English spelling rules all go something like this: Rule, and now the exceptions. I was able to spell in my High School German class better than my English class because all the German spelling followed the rules.
2013-08-04 06:54:06 PM
1 votes:
Even newspaper editors and writers can't parse an article (or title) correctly. We have become an Idiocracy.
2013-08-04 06:51:46 PM
1 votes:

Smeggy Smurf: Yes because misspellings in architectural plans won't mean a half million dollar change order.


In the early 90's, when I first saw Windows icons, I thought it was the beginning of the end of literacy. I called them hieroglyphs - which seemed appropriate at the time considering I lived in the Middle East. There were no LOL, IMHO, or all the other internet shorthand at that time.

The premise is that we don't need to understand spelling, grammar, mathematics etc. because we have smart phones. Who programs the smart phones? Where do we find the capacity do understand law, engineering, medicine if it isn't important to know the basics?

/Grammar Nazi
//Enjoyable hobby
2013-08-04 06:46:21 PM
1 votes:
Correcting spelling is the one thing Teddy Roosevelt never accomplished.  Everyone made fun of him for it, even.

\imagine the balls needed to make fun of TR...solid farking titanium
2013-08-04 06:38:42 PM
1 votes:
Actually, spelling is so farked up that "learning" it is probably bad for a kids brain anyway. There's more important stuff to learn, like critical thinking, math and science.
2013-08-04 06:30:14 PM
1 votes:
Did he get it from Yahoo Answers? That place is hilarious.
 
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