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(Yahoo)   Perfessor say the kidzz no longger needs to learn the spelling and that grammarica stuff because of ur phones is smart enuff   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 138
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4230 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Aug 2013 at 6:27 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-04 09:44:43 PM
I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.
 
2013-08-04 09:48:11 PM

Medusa's Daughter: I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.


Wow. I feel for you. She probably did not even know the meaning of "case". To be fair though, English has largely shed that feature.
 
2013-08-04 09:52:50 PM
And this is why "Idiocracy" is closer than we thought. All we need is someone to make "Ow, My Balls" and "Ass".

/ Now go way baiting.
 
2013-08-04 09:55:33 PM

Freschel: And this is why "Idiocracy" is closer than we thought. All we need is someone to make "Ow, My Balls" and "Ass".

/ Now go way baiting.


It's spelled 'batin', you illiterate.
 
2013-08-04 09:55:50 PM

aagrajag: UsikFark: Jabberwookiee: UsikFark: "Standardized" English is not really a thing, the language changes as it goes along. Accepted spellings and even the accepted way to shape the letters of our alphabet have changed pretty dramatically. Why not expect things to change further?

Get the fark out of here with your descriptive linguistics. We're all about prescribing proper grammar and spelling up in this biatch.

"Up in this" will be next century's Olde Poetic Seaying.

And with regard to the particular challenges up in this biatch, the industry must address the reality that shiat be all like highly protean, no wham sane, ladies and gentlemen.


Trash an ready, me bredduh.
 
2013-08-04 09:59:27 PM

UsikFark: "Standardized" English is not really a thing, the language changes as it goes along. Accepted spellings and even the accepted way to shape the letters of our alphabet have changed pretty dramatically. Why not expect things to change further?


All languages evolve. Standardization just slows that process down, making it possible to achieve a greater degree of uniformity/intelligibility over time and space. It's the reason the average educated English speaker wouldn't have much trouble with Shakespeare, but would probably need specialized training to go much further back than that.
 
2013-08-04 10:01:43 PM

Medusa's Daughter: I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.


You's wearing out yon space bar with all those spaces... You'll notice Fark parses your sentences with a non-breaking space to accommodate your outdated typing. What is with the parenthetical monstrosity I've bolded in the quoted section?
 
2013-08-04 10:10:12 PM

Bumblefark: UsikFark: "Standardized" English is not really a thing, the language changes as it goes along. Accepted spellings and even the accepted way to shape the letters of our alphabet have changed pretty dramatically. Why not expect things to change further?

All languages evolve. Standardization just slows that process down, making it possible to achieve a greater degree of uniformity/intelligibility over time and space. It's the reason the average educated English speaker wouldn't have much trouble with Shakespeare, but would probably need specialized training to go much further back than that.


It seems the main grammar gripes are akin to preserving our language from change when in reality it has only been in this state for a couple centuries or less. It's a bit like how we think nature is static, and then preserve the wrong things based on this assumption. We've "preserved" some of our national parks like English gardens, not something natural and organic.

There is a society in France that is bent on "protecting" the French language from outside vulgarization, they are as bad as any stereotypical HOA. "Stop having fun you guys and do it right" is not my idea of well thought out policies.
 
2013-08-04 10:15:10 PM

UsikFark: Medusa's Daughter: I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.

You's wearing out yon space bar with all those spaces... You'll notice Fark parses your sentences with a non-breaking space to accommodate your outdated typing. What is with the parenthetical monstrosity I've bolded in the quoted section?


If I made a perfect post, what would you gripe about to the world?
 
2013-08-04 10:20:53 PM
Listens, grammer am for persons what can't think for MYSELF!  Understanded me?
 
2013-08-04 10:27:23 PM

Medusa's Daughter: UsikFark: Medusa's Daughter: I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.

You's wearing out yon space bar with all those spaces... You'll notice Fark parses your sentences with a non-breaking space to accommodate your outdated typing. What is with the parenthetical monstrosity I've bolded in the quoted section?

If I made a perfect post, what would you gripe about to the world?


I'd gripe about other things, other people, and myself. I hate all three equally, but not always at the same time.
 
2013-08-04 10:36:22 PM

UsikFark: Medusa's Daughter: UsikFark: Medusa's Daughter: I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.

You's wearing out yon space bar with all those spaces... You'll notice Fark parses your sentences with a non-breaking space to accommodate your outdated typing. What is with the parenthetical monstrosity I've bolded in the quoted section?

If I made a perfect post, what would you gripe about to the world?

I'd gripe about other things, other people, and myself. I hate all three equally, but not always at the same time.


You remind me of my husband. You make me laugh.  I think I like you.
 
2013-08-04 10:43:48 PM

UsikFark: Bumblefark: UsikFark: "Standardized" English is not really a thing, the language changes as it goes along. Accepted spellings and even the accepted way to shape the letters of our alphabet have changed pretty dramatically. Why not expect things to change further?

All languages evolve. Standardization just slows that process down, making it possible to achieve a greater degree of uniformity/intelligibility over time and space. It's the reason the average educated English speaker wouldn't have much trouble with Shakespeare, but would probably need specialized training to go much further back than that.

It seems the main grammar gripes are akin to preserving our language from change when in reality it has only been in this state for a couple centuries or less. It's a bit like how we think nature is static, and then preserve the wrong things based on this assumption. We've "preserved" some of our national parks like English gardens, not something natural and organic.

There is a society in France that is bent on "protecting" the French language from outside vulgarization, they are as bad as any stereotypical HOA. "Stop having fun you guys and do it right" is not my idea of well thought out policies.


True enough. As with any set of rules, there's always going to be some who forget that the rules are a means to an end, rather than an end unto themselves. And that's where grammar Nazis come from.

English has their share of language prigs and purists, but relatively fewer than the Europeans, probably since we never established an official language academy. English grammar has always been somewhat more democratic, since our "rules" come mostly by way of dictionaries and other primers that tend to be more descriptive in focus.

But, however a language gets there, standardization is a pretty important part of how modern society works. How an otherwise educated person like Mitra manages overlook such a simple point is something I'll never understand.
 
2013-08-04 10:49:25 PM
Since when do phones check grammar? Is this some iPhone thing I, a lowly Android user, I haven't heard of (over and over again by Apple fanbois...)? Or the next greatest and latest thing from Motorola?
 
2013-08-04 10:49:35 PM

Smeggy Smurf: Yes because misspellings in architectural plans won't mean a half million dollar change order.



If there's an amusing anecdote here that you're willing to share, I'd love to hear it...
 
2013-08-04 10:50:30 PM

Your Average Witty Fark User: Because spell check knows when you meant to use your/you're.

WTF.


If your spellcheck can't figure it out, you're using really crappy spellcheck.
 
2013-08-04 10:56:27 PM

hitlersbrain: Actually, spelling is so farked up that "learning" it is probably bad for a kids brain anyway. There's more important stuff to learn, like critical thinking, math and science.


Not to mention proper use of the apostrophe.
 
2013-08-04 10:58:53 PM
Edjumication is much much important dan football

/obscuriest of the obscure
 
2013-08-04 11:11:03 PM

Bedstead Polisher: Semi-related: I heard one of the upper managers at work say the other day, "are we in agreeance?"


You should have said, "No, we're in a building...duh!"
 
2013-08-04 11:11:07 PM
rlv.zcache.com
 
2013-08-04 11:18:38 PM

werty789: The English language needs an overhaul. Modern English is a cobbled together language made up of bits and pieces of many languages. Spelling English is difficult because there are no set rules. English spelling rules all go something like this: Rule, and now the exceptions.


Oh, English spelling is much worse than you're describing.  For example, the following words all rhyme (at least in standard american english) but are spelled differently:

Fear
Beer
Pier
Premiere
Deer
Mere
We're

Seven different ways of spelling the same vowel sound.  You practically have to memorize the spelling of every word in the language.
 
2013-08-04 11:29:57 PM
Tobin_Lam
Your Average Witty Fark User:
Because spell check knows when you meant to use your/you're.
WTF.

If your spellcheck can't figure it out, you're using really crappy spellcheck.


Here, here!
Queue the people who think that's bad per say for all intensive purposes.
 
2013-08-04 11:41:26 PM

phaseolus: Smeggy Smurf: Yes because misspellings in architectural plans won't mean a half million dollar change order.


If there's an amusing anecdote here that you're willing to share, I'd love to hear it...


Not quite that kind of money but I once misspelled a sign that said Cat Meat instead of Cat Food.  It went out on three separate store on the merchandise signage plan before it was caught.  Frunished is another favorite goof.
 
2013-08-04 11:43:23 PM

StatelyGreekAutomaton: Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: A world where every novel reads like a Damn You Autocorrect entry is not one in which I am wont to live.

I am want to live. :D


I don't know whether to love you or hate you for that, and therefore I love you.
 
2013-08-04 11:46:45 PM

swingerofbirches: I had one teacher in all of K-12 who taught grammar, and she was amazing at it.


The one teacher that dared to teach us sentence diagramming also had a red flip REDO stamp on his desk and would grade our papers while we were writing new ones in class.. If he found what he called a "common gross error" (there was a long list of these, any misspelling, using the wrong to/too/two, etc) he would announce your name and the nature of your error and the stamp would come down with a KA-CHUNK that would reverberate around the room. You'd then have to write the whole paper over again, and this was before word processors became common (though I had one, luckily for me).

I loved him.
 
2013-08-04 11:59:45 PM

fusillade762: swingerofbirches: I had one teacher in all of K-12 who taught grammar, and she was amazing at it.

The one teacher that dared to teach us sentence diagramming also had a red flip REDO stamp on his desk and would grade our papers while we were writing new ones in class.. If he found what he called a "common gross error" (there was a long list of these, any misspelling, using the wrong to/too/two, etc) he would announce your name and the nature of your error and the stamp would come down with a KA-CHUNK that would reverberate around the room. You'd then have to write the whole paper over again, and this was before word processors became common (though I had one, luckily for me).

I loved him.


I would have loved that, too. Shows my personality. I was terrified of any type of aggression like that from, say, a gym coach. But academically I loved being challenged and also challenging the teacher, especially with language. I'm thinking of majoring in linguistics now.
 
2013-08-05 01:05:41 AM
Poor communication, it's just one more way to discover and define who is Anointed  Upper Crust and who's working their way up the ladder.
College is only half education at best.
The largest part of college is networking your dad's business into more profit centered arenas.
No. Not joking.
Nobody wants to hear it or talk about it so I'm out here in the wilderness mostly.
s'okay.
 
2013-08-05 01:25:48 AM

aagrajag: Freschel: And this is why "Idiocracy" is closer than we thought. All we need is someone to make "Ow, My Balls" and "Ass".

/ Now go way baiting.

It's spelled 'batin', you illiterate.


It's spelled "scrote" you illiterate scrote!

i651.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-05 02:29:43 AM

Slartibeerfest: Hez rite! I dote neeed skool. I hav mi fone!


images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-08-05 02:53:56 AM

The Voice of Doom: Tobin_Lam
Your Average Witty Fark User: Because spell check knows when you meant to use your/you're.
WTF.

If your spellcheck can't figure it out, you're using really crappy spellcheck.

Here, here!
Queue the people who think that's bad per say for all intensive purposes.


Not me, I could care less about you're queue. If you folk's want to tow that line, fine, but I think I talk perfectly good whether or not anybody that says different.

/not a single suggested correction on Microsoft Word, BTW.
 
2013-08-05 03:41:11 AM

The Voice of Doom: Tobin_Lam
Your Average Witty Fark User: Because spell check knows when you meant to use your/you're.
WTF.

If your spellcheck can't figure it out, you're using really crappy spellcheck.

Here, here!
Queue the people who think that's bad per say for all intensive purposes.


Intensive porpoises! U dun trolled me gud. Bastard! :-). I wunt yer noozleter
 
2013-08-05 04:35:31 AM

aagrajag: Medusa's Daughter: I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.

Wow. I feel for you. She probably did not even know the meaning of "case". To be fair though, English has largely shed that feature.


Probably she did, really, but wasn't familiar with the term "case."  That is, if you had asked "subject or object pronoun?" she probably would have understood what you meant.  i suspect you judged her too harshly.
 
2013-08-05 04:59:36 AM

ciberido: aagrajag: Medusa's Daughter: I taught high school English for 5 years.  In each grade 3/4 of the class was literature and writing skills.  1/4 of the class was parts of speech, punctuation, grammar and diagramming.  By graduation, my kids knew grammar, how to write, how to analyze, and some even learned the dark secrets of diagramming.  I actually use diagramming.  I edit my husband's novels and he often uses complex sentences with some really crappy punctuation.  (And he was an English major, too).  I often need to diagram the sentence in my head to figure out how many commas to toss out and what goes in where.

My 12th grade English teacher asked the class to give an example of a pronoun.  Everyone sat there with a blank look.  I asked, "What case?"  She could not grasp that pronouns had case.  I learned that back in 7th grade.

Wow. I feel for you. She probably did not even know the meaning of "case". To be fair though, English has largely shed that feature.

Probably she did, really, but wasn't familiar with the term "case."  That is, if you had asked "subject or object pronoun?" she probably would have understood what you meant.  i suspect you judged her too harshly.


Harshly? Perhaps. I am a linguist and translator. I am a professional grammar Nazi. ;)
 
2013-08-05 09:27:00 AM
Eye sink u will alwyz be table 2 twll what I mene. Swype rox1
 
2013-08-05 12:34:54 PM

2chris2: werty789: The English language needs an overhaul. Modern English is a cobbled together language made up of bits and pieces of many languages. Spelling English is difficult because there are no set rules. English spelling rules all go something like this: Rule, and now the exceptions.

Oh, English spelling is much worse than you're describing.  For example, the following words all rhyme (at least in standard american english) but are spelled differently:

Fear
Beer
Pier
Premiere
Deer
Mere
We're

Seven different ways of spelling the same vowel sound.  You practically have to memorize the spelling of every word in the language.


Beer and Deer are the same.  Did you mean "dear"?
 
2013-08-05 01:43:49 PM
It's times like this that I actually wonder, if just for a tiny moment, if an alien civilization is trying to slowly breed us into a mindless herd species without our noticing.

/they have cookbooks I hear
 
2013-08-05 01:55:52 PM

2chris2: werty789: The English language needs an overhaul. Modern English is a cobbled together language made up of bits and pieces of many languages. Spelling English is difficult because there are no set rules. English spelling rules all go something like this: Rule, and now the exceptions.

Oh, English spelling is much worse than you're describing.  For example, the following words all rhyme (at least in standard american english) but are spelled differently:

Fear
Beer
Pier
Premiere
Deer
Mere
We're

Seven different ways of spelling the same vowel sound.  You practically have to memorize the spelling of every word in the language.


Good old Dr Suess points out the -ough problem, as does Charles Battell Loomis:

tough (uff)
cough (off)
plough (ow)
dough (oh)
through (oo)
hiccough (up)
hough (ock)
thought (aw)
thorough (uh [Brit.])
lough (okh)
 
2013-08-05 03:06:16 PM
Ok, how are we this far into the thread, and no one noticed(or mentioned) the article is Yahoo linking to the Daily Caller.

The Daily Caller.

The Daily Caller.

The Daily Caller.

Three guesses why the Daily Derp has an article saying you don't need spelling and grammar, and your first two don't count.
 
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