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(WKYC Cleveland)   "You can't fire me, I quit" says Ohio death row inmate   (wkyc.com) divider line 9
    More: Interesting, Billy Slagle, Ohio, killer, death row, convicts  
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10724 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Aug 2013 at 4:47 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-08-04 05:55:14 PM  
2 votes:

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


40-year-old woman stabbed to death gets my sympathy.  POS that killed her, not so much.
2013-08-04 04:50:56 PM  
2 votes:
TFA is a farken autoplay Grrrgrgrgr!! Can't Fark have a standing policy to NOT greenlight troll articles?!
2013-08-04 11:48:08 PM  
1 votes:
i40.tinypic.com
2013-08-04 06:48:05 PM  
1 votes:

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


Joseph Edward Duncan, III.  Death row.  Convicted of multiple murders.

He broke into the home of Brenda Groene and Mark Mackenzie, clubbed them and Brenda's teenage son, Slade, to death with a hammer, then kidnapped her other children, Shasta, 8, and Dylan, 9, taking them into the Idaho and Montana wilderness. For the next 7 weeks or so, he filmed himself torturing Dylan by hanging him by his wrists to trees, stripping him naked, punching and kicking him all over, especially his genitals, burning him with cigarettes, all while shouting at him that, "God is nowhere listening, Dylan! I am the Devil!"

He finally shot Dylan dead, after raping him multiple times over the course of those 7 weeks, during which time he raped and beat Shasta, also.

I am completely OK with people like this facing capital punishment.
2013-08-04 06:21:02 PM  
1 votes:

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


Considering what you have to do get a death sentence in any state that isnt Texas, there is literally nothing that could be done to them that I would deem too cruel.  I'm just bummed that the family of the victim didnt get to see that POS snuffed out like a cigarette butt.
2013-08-04 06:00:42 PM  
1 votes:

StoPPeRmobile: swingerofbirches: When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

It's called driving.


It's actually very funny you say that. I have panic disorder, OCD, and Tourette's. I also take a lot of medicine for those. And for both reasons I haven't driven in a long time, as in about a decade. And I've recently been pushed by family and friends and my doctor to start again. And I always tell people how incredibly dangerous it is. I daydream about cars that are like hovercrafts with big, wide buttresses of pillowy air-filled fabric. And roads with "bumpers." So that the worst thing that happens in a crash is something that looks like billiard balls bouncing off each other.

Can you imagine if we had a war on traffic deaths the way we've had a war on terrorism? 9/11 killed 3,000 people. Car accidents kill 40,000 people a year. I think the war is worth waging.

Anyhow, I do get your point, kind of . . . but I'm not sure it's the same thing. Driving is a tolerable risk for most people. It's a decision. Car accidents are not usually deliberate.
2013-08-04 05:51:33 PM  
1 votes:

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


I see you and I differ greatly. I think about the surviving family of the victims having to wait for justice to be done. Hoping that the governor is busy that night, that no electrical storms or heat waves, etc compromise the execution. That no ass hat lawyer finds a technicality. I feel very sorry for the family, and having to wait for the news that it is *finally* over.

I never thought about it from the death row persons side. And, I never will. I don't care much about their position or how it affects them. I want them dead. Dead murders can't be released or escape from prison by accident or idiocy.

However, the good news is we agree on something. I would very much agree with speedier sentences. Let the appeals start *immediately* and after due diligence is done just trot them out to chair and get it over with.

Could also make a rope in their cell standard equipment after a guilty sentencing. Add a ring mounted to the ceiling, too, so they can go their own way, ASAP. I never did understand why anyone would want to stop a murderer from committing suicide.
2013-08-04 05:20:52 PM  
1 votes:
This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?
2013-08-04 03:44:10 PM  
1 votes:
And nothing of value was lost. Gotta give it to the guy though, he went out on his own terms. 

He told you he was hardcore.
 
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