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(WKYC Cleveland)   "You can't fire me, I quit" says Ohio death row inmate   (wkyc.com) divider line 84
    More: Interesting, Billy Slagle, Ohio, killer, death row, convicts  
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10713 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Aug 2013 at 4:47 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



84 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-08-04 03:44:10 PM
And nothing of value was lost. Gotta give it to the guy though, he went out on his own terms. 

He told you he was hardcore.
 
2013-08-04 04:48:37 PM
Don't leave me hanging, what happened?
 
2013-08-04 04:50:33 PM

Nothing To See Here: Don't leave me hanging, what happened?


He fixed the cable.
 
2013-08-04 04:50:56 PM
TFA is a farken autoplay Grrrgrgrgr!! Can't Fark have a standing policy to NOT greenlight troll articles?!
 
2013-08-04 04:50:58 PM
It's not often a guy gets to suspend his own sentence.
 
2013-08-04 04:51:56 PM
Next!
 
2013-08-04 04:52:07 PM

Nothing To See Here: Don't leave me hanging, what happened?


He tried to pull a David Carradine.
 
2013-08-04 04:53:08 PM

doosh: TFA is a farken autoplay Grrrgrgrgr!! Can't Fark have a standing policy to NOT greenlight troll articles?!


A standing policy not to publish not-news? What website you on?
 
TWX
2013-08-04 04:57:38 PM
I just hope they don't void his conviction like they do some convicts that die before appeals and/or term of sentence run out.
 
2013-08-04 04:58:31 PM

doosh: TFA is a farken autoplay Grrrgrgrgr!! Can't Fark have a standing policy to NOT greenlight troll articles?!


but it doesn't start with an ad so just stopping is enough upset.
 
2013-08-04 04:58:58 PM

hardinparamedic: Nothing To See Here: Don't leave me hanging, what happened?

He tried to pull a David Carradine.


He should have dropped his pants and lubed up front and back before he did it. Just to make them wonder.
 
2013-08-04 05:00:19 PM
He was within hours of beginning the standard 72-hour, pre-execution suicide watch, which is not a successful one-size-fits-all policy as it turns out.
 
2013-08-04 05:01:19 PM

darth_badger: hardinparamedic: Nothing To See Here: Don't leave me hanging, what happened?

He tried to pull a David Carradine.

He should have dropped his pants and lubed up front and back before he did it. Just to make them wonder.


You strike me as a man with a twisted sense of humor, sir.
 
2013-08-04 05:01:26 PM

hardinparamedic: Nothing To See Here: Don't leave me hanging, what happened?

He tried to pull a David Carradine.


Prisoners have limited options when it comes to a little variety or "entertainment." Have you heard what kinds of drugs prisoners abuse? They'll get themselves on anti-psychotics just for kicks. For those who don't know, anti-psychotics work by blocking the happy-chemicals in your brain, which cause psychosis if you have too many floating around. for a normal person, blocking those chemicals leads to a rough approximation of depression, and you get undesirable, and sometimes permanent, physical and mental side effects.  People who take anti-psychotics for a long time develop things like motor tremors and muscle tics, plus it screws with your cholesterol and blood sugar so you can get type II diabetes. Presumably, they get on these drugs so they can snooze and drool their way through the prison experience.
 
2013-08-04 05:01:39 PM
Would it have killed him to wait a week?
 
2013-08-04 05:02:30 PM
Well, no noose is good noose.
v010o.popscreen.com
Oh wait...
 
2013-08-04 05:04:01 PM

doosh: TFA is a farken autoplay Grrrgrgrgr!! Can't Fark have a standing policy to NOT greenlight troll articles?!




You would think after 4 years you could figure this out.

farm3.staticflickr.com
 
2013-08-04 05:04:50 PM
www.explosm.net

Approves.
 
2013-08-04 05:05:37 PM
He hung around.........for the Final Countdown.
 
2013-08-04 05:06:17 PM

StoPPeRmobile: doosh: TFA is a farken autoplay Grrrgrgrgr!! Can't Fark have a standing policy to NOT greenlight troll articles?!

You would think after 4 years you could figure this out.

[farm3.staticflickr.com image 238x320]


more like:

www.esreality.com
 
2013-08-04 05:06:28 PM

hardinparamedic: Nothing To See Here: Don't leave me hanging, what happened?

He tried to pull a David Carradine.


That joke is just INXS good sir.
 
2013-08-04 05:09:29 PM
Red Neck way out.
 
2013-08-04 05:13:56 PM

hardinparamedic: Nothing To See Here: Don't leave me hanging, what happened?

He tried to pull a David Carradine.


Caradine pulled himself - .... oh wait - so did this guy hehehehe
 
2013-08-04 05:14:30 PM

hardinparamedic: Nothing To See Here: Don't leave me hanging, what happened?

He tried to pull a David Carradine.


The stroke 'n choke?
 
2013-08-04 05:20:52 PM
This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?
 
2013-08-04 05:22:35 PM
www.morethings.com
/helped Boris out
 
2013-08-04 05:32:59 PM
OTOH, Ohio stock of lethal chemicals will be able to be used for some other deserving death row inmate.
 
2013-08-04 05:47:19 PM

swingerofbirches: When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.




It's called driving.
 
2013-08-04 05:51:33 PM

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


I see you and I differ greatly. I think about the surviving family of the victims having to wait for justice to be done. Hoping that the governor is busy that night, that no electrical storms or heat waves, etc compromise the execution. That no ass hat lawyer finds a technicality. I feel very sorry for the family, and having to wait for the news that it is *finally* over.

I never thought about it from the death row persons side. And, I never will. I don't care much about their position or how it affects them. I want them dead. Dead murders can't be released or escape from prison by accident or idiocy.

However, the good news is we agree on something. I would very much agree with speedier sentences. Let the appeals start *immediately* and after due diligence is done just trot them out to chair and get it over with.

Could also make a rope in their cell standard equipment after a guilty sentencing. Add a ring mounted to the ceiling, too, so they can go their own way, ASAP. I never did understand why anyone would want to stop a murderer from committing suicide.
 
2013-08-04 05:54:26 PM
He killed a Pope so Dan Brown will probably write a book about it.
 
2013-08-04 05:55:04 PM
FTFA: "a comprehensive after action review and investigation is underway on how Slagle was able to get material to commit the suicide."

Hopefully to promote and encourage this.
Like a free 12-foot length of rope, and a book on knot-tying with details of how to make a hangman's noose?
 
2013-08-04 05:55:14 PM

hardinparamedic: And nothing of value was lost. Gotta give it to the guy though, he went out on his own terms.


I doubt his terms included being thrown into prison just so he could enjoy the privilege of hanging himself.  Then again I could be wrong, maybe all the cool people are doing it.
 
2013-08-04 05:55:14 PM

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


40-year-old woman stabbed to death gets my sympathy.  POS that killed her, not so much.
 
2013-08-04 05:58:57 PM

BummerDuck: I never did understand why anyone would want to stop a murderer from committing suicide.


Suicide is against the law.

Actually, I think the reasoning is the entire formal procedure of an execution is required for proper justice.  A suicide subverts justice.

Personally, I say give the condemned inmate a rope and selection of poison pills so they can go early if they so choose.
 
2013-08-04 06:00:42 PM

StoPPeRmobile: swingerofbirches: When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

It's called driving.


It's actually very funny you say that. I have panic disorder, OCD, and Tourette's. I also take a lot of medicine for those. And for both reasons I haven't driven in a long time, as in about a decade. And I've recently been pushed by family and friends and my doctor to start again. And I always tell people how incredibly dangerous it is. I daydream about cars that are like hovercrafts with big, wide buttresses of pillowy air-filled fabric. And roads with "bumpers." So that the worst thing that happens in a crash is something that looks like billiard balls bouncing off each other.

Can you imagine if we had a war on traffic deaths the way we've had a war on terrorism? 9/11 killed 3,000 people. Car accidents kill 40,000 people a year. I think the war is worth waging.

Anyhow, I do get your point, kind of . . . but I'm not sure it's the same thing. Driving is a tolerable risk for most people. It's a decision. Car accidents are not usually deliberate.
 
2013-08-04 06:01:26 PM

GoldDude: FTFA: "a comprehensive after action review and investigation is underway on how Slagle was able to get material to commit the suicide."

Hopefully to promote and encourage this.
Like a free 12-foot length of rope, and a book on knot-tying with details of how to make a hangman's noose?


Is this the Sign of the Twines? He wanted to go out in Europe, not your rope.
 
2013-08-04 06:01:44 PM

BummerDuck: I never did understand why anyone would want to stop a murderer from committing suicide.


Maybe in the event that the suicide was botched and now you have to deal with a mentally or physically disabled person, bit of a different game? I'm also sure there are lawyers willing to argue both side of the moral, legal, and practical aspects of prisoners being allowed to harm themselves regardless of sentence or outcome.
 
2013-08-04 06:04:18 PM
Once again Kids, Hemp kills . . .
www.tokeofthetown.com
 
2013-08-04 06:11:02 PM
Subby is dyslexic?
He misspelled frie.

/knows the proper spelling
//why fried though? Why not fryed?
///strange language this English
////misses the Galagher rant
\\ran out of proper slashies
 
2013-08-04 06:12:33 PM

OgreMagi: Personally, I say give the condemned inmate a rope and selection of poison pills so they can go early if they so choose.


If it were me, I'd give the condemn the option of death by slot machine.  You put the noose around them, make them strand over the trap door, then they pull the lever.  If they win they get some reduction in their sentence. Else whoops the long drop.
 
2013-08-04 06:20:11 PM

gibbon1: OgreMagi: Personally, I say give the condemned inmate a rope and selection of poison pills so they can go early if they so choose.

If it were me, I'd give the condemn the option of death by slot machine.  You put the noose around them, make them strand over the trap door, then they pull the lever.  If they win they get some reduction in their sentence. Else whoops the long drop.


I like it.  You can even open the process up to betting on the outcome.
 
2013-08-04 06:21:02 PM

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


Considering what you have to do get a death sentence in any state that isnt Texas, there is literally nothing that could be done to them that I would deem too cruel.  I'm just bummed that the family of the victim didnt get to see that POS snuffed out like a cigarette butt.
 
2013-08-04 06:23:37 PM
Wonder if he had a knot in his throat when he changed his mind . . .
 
2013-08-04 06:25:20 PM

OgreMagi: You can even open the process up to betting on the outcome.


and pay per view
 
2013-08-04 06:32:29 PM

OgreMagi: gibbon1: OgreMagi: Personally, I say give the condemned inmate a rope and selection of poison pills so they can go early if they so choose.

If it were me, I'd give the condemn the option of death by slot machine.  You put the noose around them, make them strand over the trap door, then they pull the lever.  If they win they get some reduction in their sentence. Else whoops the long drop.

I like it.  You can even open the process up to betting on the outcome.


Heck, make a whole entertainment spectacle out of the process.

www.chud.com
 
2013-08-04 06:35:28 PM
Hey Billy, the governor just called. Says he's going to grant the par... Never mind.
 
2013-08-04 06:40:33 PM
You must admit, that is great way to start a hunger strike.
 
2013-08-04 06:42:39 PM
I have now gained a modicum of respect for the man.

"Well, it's not going to go my way. Prison sucks, and it's the only thing I'll ever see before I die. Might as well end it now."

He was proactive, and took a step to change his situation. shiat, that's more than I can say about myself.
 
2013-08-04 06:48:05 PM

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


Joseph Edward Duncan, III.  Death row.  Convicted of multiple murders.

He broke into the home of Brenda Groene and Mark Mackenzie, clubbed them and Brenda's teenage son, Slade, to death with a hammer, then kidnapped her other children, Shasta, 8, and Dylan, 9, taking them into the Idaho and Montana wilderness. For the next 7 weeks or so, he filmed himself torturing Dylan by hanging him by his wrists to trees, stripping him naked, punching and kicking him all over, especially his genitals, burning him with cigarettes, all while shouting at him that, "God is nowhere listening, Dylan! I am the Devil!"

He finally shot Dylan dead, after raping him multiple times over the course of those 7 weeks, during which time he raped and beat Shasta, also.

I am completely OK with people like this facing capital punishment.
 
2013-08-04 06:48:50 PM

Nem Wan: He was within hours of beginning the standard 72-hour, pre-execution suicide watch, which is not a successful one-size-fits-all policy as it turns out.


I've never understood that, to be honest.  Why put a suicide watch on them, if you're just going to kill them anyway?  Is the state afraid the prisoner will deprive them of the pleasure?
 
2013-08-04 06:51:38 PM
Ohio upset.  Staff in prisons are required to waste state money saving the life of a death row inmate trying to take it, in order use state money to kill him or her.
 
2013-08-04 06:57:21 PM

HeartBurnKid: Nem Wan: He was within hours of beginning the standard 72-hour, pre-execution suicide watch, which is not a successful one-size-fits-all policy as it turns out.

I've never understood that, to be honest.  Why put a suicide watch on them, if you're just going to kill them anyway?  Is the state afraid the prisoner will deprive them of the pleasure?


Allowing a prisoner to commit suicide or otherwise damage their person, while in the care of the state, is considered cruel and unusual punishment.
 
2013-08-04 07:11:17 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-04 07:11:52 PM
Way to pull a Goering
 
2013-08-04 07:13:50 PM
Everyone on death row should be given accesses to a painless suicide pill they can take at anytime. If they want to wait out their appeals sure but if they want to end it early let them.
 
2013-08-04 07:14:07 PM

AngryDragon: swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?

Joseph Edward Duncan, III.  Death row.  Convicted of multiple murders.

He broke into the home of Brenda Groene and Mark Mackenzie, clubbed them and Brenda's teenage son, Slade, to death with a hammer, then kidnapped her other children, Shasta, 8, and Dylan, 9, taking them into the Idaho and Montana wilderness. For the next 7 weeks or so, he filmed himself torturing Dylan by hanging him by his wrists to trees, stripping him naked, punching and kicking him all over, especially his genitals, burning him with cigarettes, all while shouting at him that, "God is nowhere listening, Dylan! I am the Devil!"

He finally shot Dylan dead, after raping him multiple times over the course of those 7 weeks, during which time he raped and beat Shasta, also.

I am completely OK with people like this facing capital punishment.


If only every case was that easy.
 
2013-08-04 07:40:33 PM

LavenderWolf: HeartBurnKid: Nem Wan: He was within hours of beginning the standard 72-hour, pre-execution suicide watch, which is not a successful one-size-fits-all policy as it turns out.

I've never understood that, to be honest.  Why put a suicide watch on them, if you're just going to kill them anyway?  Is the state afraid the prisoner will deprive them of the pleasure?

Allowing a prisoner to commit suicide or otherwise damage their person, while in the care of the state, is considered cruel and unusual punishment.


In Texas, Texas Department of Criminal Justice (the prison system) will write the offender up with a case and the offender is subject to disciplinary actions for damaging their person (destruction of government property) http://www.tdcj.state.tx.us/documents/cid/Disciplinary_Rules_and_Proc e dures_for_Offenders_English.pdf
see page 27.  Young woman I know had a nightmare, sat up in her bunk quickly and cut her head on the steel frame above her. She was written up for it. Rolling up your sleeves in the exercise yard to get some sun is another way to catch a case for destruction of government property. Side note- an offender commited suicide some years ago. While waiting for officials to pronounce him dead, he was written  up on a destruction of government property charge (and it stuck on his record).
 
2013-08-04 07:48:29 PM

fat boy: OTOH, Ohio stock of lethal chemicals will be able to be used for some other deserving death row inmate.


Fun fact: Texas' stock is due to expire soon (as in next month), and it's just not profitable enough or good PR for major companies to make more. It'll be interesting to see where this goes.
 
2013-08-04 07:51:25 PM

Fireproof: fat boy: OTOH, Ohio stock of lethal chemicals will be able to be used for some other deserving death row inmate.

Fun fact: Texas' stock is due to expire soon (as in next month), and it's just not profitable enough or good PR for major companies to make more. It'll be interesting to see where this goes.


There isn't firing squad in Texas? If not can't they just pass a law allowing hanging or firing squad?
 
2013-08-04 07:52:55 PM
The execution of the sentence needs to be unpredictable. What fear is there in knowing that you will be fed and clothed and housed until a certain day, and then you will see death in what is promised to be an humane manner? Any number of cancer patients would be relieved to know they had a finite yet predictable number of well maintained and healthy years left.

It would make for especially amusing nap-times to tell them that they are sometimes roused roughly for a final walk just as they get off to a fitful sleep. But not always.
 
2013-08-04 07:54:10 PM

Nem Wan: He was within hours of beginning the standard 72-hour, pre-execution suicide watch, which is not a successful one-size-fits-all policy as it turns out.


Way to beat the clock, there, buddy.  But really, WHY is there such a thing?
 
2013-08-04 07:54:44 PM

Fireproof: fat boy: OTOH, Ohio stock of lethal chemicals will be able to be used for some other deserving death row inmate.

Fun fact: Texas' stock is due to expire soon (as in next month), and it's just not profitable enough or good PR for major companies to make more. It'll be interesting to see where this goes.


www.anna-klinkhammer.de
Delaware - They got shiat done.  Last hangin' was 1996 or so.
 
2013-08-04 07:58:57 PM

letrole: The execution of the sentence needs to be unpredictable. What fear is there in knowing that you will be fed and clothed and housed until a certain day, and then you will see death in what is promised to be an humane manner? Any number of cancer patients murder victims would be have been relieved to know they had a finite yet predictable number of well maintained and healthy years left.


FTFY.  Also, has nobody ever considered what this man just demonstrated:  that knowing the exact date and time of your death is a considerable stressor and anxiety inducer?

Anybody who has ever been 'short' on getting out of a BAD situation knows how the countdown to freedom feels.  But how does THIS countdown feel?
 
2013-08-04 08:07:00 PM

midnite_farker: LavenderWolf: HeartBurnKid: Nem Wan: He was within hours of beginning the standard 72-hour, pre-execution suicide watch, which is not a successful one-size-fits-all policy as it turns out.

I've never understood that, to be honest.  Why put a suicide watch on them, if you're just going to kill them anyway?  Is the state afraid the prisoner will deprive them of the pleasure?

Allowing a prisoner to commit suicide or otherwise damage their person, while in the care of the state, is considered cruel and unusual punishment.

In Texas, Texas Department of Criminal Justice (the prison system) will write the offender up with a case and the offender is subject to disciplinary actions for damaging their person (destruction of government property) http://www.tdcj.state.tx.us/documents/cid/Disciplinary_Rules_and_Proc e dures_for_Offenders_English.pdf
see page 27.  Young woman I know had a nightmare, sat up in her bunk quickly and cut her head on the steel frame above her. She was written up for it. Rolling up your sleeves in the exercise yard to get some sun is another way to catch a case for destruction of government property. Side note- an offender commited suicide some years ago. While waiting for officials to pronounce him dead, he was written  up on a destruction of government property charge (and it stuck on his record).


Persons are never "property" even in prison. The document you linked lists self-inflicted injury not due to diagnosed mental illness as a separate Level 3 offense while destruction of state property is a Level 2 offense. Since the department of corrections has broad discretion to make rules for prisoners I don't know why they'd be abusing the rules in a blatantly stupid way.
 
2013-08-04 08:19:48 PM
AngryDragon:
I am completely OK with people like this facing capital punishment.

That's the kind of person that you wish you could play Capital Punishment Fakeout Roulette with.

Lead him to Old Sparky.  On Roll On Two, discover that whoever wired it up got the volts right, but not the amps.
Stand before the wall for firing squad.  Dammit, sarge, you weren't supposed to give them ALL blanks! (wink, nudge)
Climb the gallows, rope round neck.  Nice and tight.  Forget to remove the safety bolt from the trapdoor hinge.

Well, shiat, man, we'll get it right one of these times...
 
2013-08-04 08:37:47 PM

xxcorydxx: [www.explosm.net image 702x599]

Approves.


I'll say it again: there is an xkcd, PBF, and/or cyanide & happiness for ANY Fark thread.
 
2013-08-04 08:38:52 PM

TWX: I just hope they don't void his conviction like they do some convicts that die before appeals and/or term of sentence run out.


So a conviction is like a warranty now?
 
2013-08-04 08:51:09 PM
If I was being executed by injection, I'd clean up my cell real neat. Then, when they came to get me, I'd say, "Injection? I thought you said inspection'." They'd probably feel real bad, and maybe I could get out of it. - Jack Handey
 
2013-08-04 08:57:55 PM

Marcintosh: Fireproof: fat boy: OTOH, Ohio stock of lethal chemicals will be able to be used for some other deserving death row inmate.

Fun fact: Texas' stock is due to expire soon (as in next month), and it's just not profitable enough or good PR for major companies to make more. It'll be interesting to see where this goes.

[www.anna-klinkhammer.de image 496x500]
Delaware - They got shiat done.  Last hangin' was 1996 or so.


The gallows and procedure for hanging in Delaware were designed by Fred Leuchter.  He is an interesting if odd person.
 
2013-08-04 10:31:14 PM

AngryDragon: swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?

Joseph Edward Duncan, III.  Death row.  Convicted of multiple murders.

He broke into the home of Brenda Groene and Mark Mackenzie, clubbed them and Brenda's teenage son, Slade, to death with a hammer, then kidnapped her other children, Shasta, 8, and Dylan, 9, taking them into the Idaho and Montana wilderness. For the next 7 weeks or so, he filmed himself torturing Dylan by hanging him by his wrists to trees, stripping him naked, punching and kicking him all over, especially his genitals, burning him with cigarettes, all while shouting at him that, "God is nowhere listening, Dylan! I am the Devil!"

He finally shot Dylan dead, after raping him multiple times over the course of those 7 weeks, during which time he raped and beat Shasta, also.

I am completely OK with people like this facing capital punishment.


What about the guy who's not guilty? Or who might be guilty, but who didn't have adequate legal representation because he's poor, and/or a minority?

Sure, if it's Ted Bundy or (probably) the guy in your tale, I'm OK with it. But almost no one who's executed is as obviously, blatantly guilty as we would like to think. If just one is innocent, is it worth killing any of them? Is it right?

Do we really want the state (i.e., governmental body) to have that power?
 
2013-08-04 10:32:56 PM

HeartBurnKid: Nem Wan: He was within hours of beginning the standard 72-hour, pre-execution suicide watch, which is not a successful one-size-fits-all policy as it turns out.

I've never understood that, to be honest.  Why put a suicide watch on them, if you're just going to kill them anyway?  Is the state afraid the prisoner will deprive them of the pleasure?


Part of it is to protect the prisoner from being murdered by other inmates or even prison personnel, who can then claim it was suicide. It's for their protection, ironically.
 
2013-08-04 11:03:38 PM

swingerofbirches: So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


I think the folks who find themselves there should have been making better choices in their lives.
 
2013-08-04 11:08:54 PM

Ishidan: Lead him to Old Sparky.  On Roll On Two, discover that whoever wired it up got the volts right, but not the amps.


Ohm man!
 
2013-08-04 11:27:06 PM
CSB time.  When I worked for the Oklahoma Corrections department, we had a death row inmate (Robert Brecheen) who never even pulled the trigger but because of the law since he was in the car when his partner was in the house murdering a family, he got the death penalty.  Over the years he spent on death row, he became the model inmate, becoming an orderly and AFAIK not having any serious misconducts.  Flash forward to the night of the execution.  On the required 15 minute check he was found unresponsive.  Seems he had overdosed on his meds and a few others he wasn't prescribed.  (a nurse resigned over allegations she had provided the extra meds)  Anyway, they pulled him from the cell and took him to the infirmary, all the while administering CPR even in the ambulance to the hospital.  They got him going again and pumped his stomach out, brought him back to the prison and two hours after the scheduled time, they stuck the needle in.

Even more so, at that point, Oklahoma had been executing inmates left and right and the media was basically like "oh another execution we will cover it tomorrow" and there was only one tv crew there and they didn't even have a satellite link to the station so it was basically filmed and shown the next night.
 
2013-08-04 11:48:08 PM
i40.tinypic.com
 
2013-08-05 01:38:50 AM
The whole point is revenge, not justice. Someone killing themselves before the bureaucracy gets to, robs people of their revenge.

If the person is locked up and unable to commit any more crimes, justice is done. Hating them or wanting them dead for any reason is voluntarily perpetuating the crime. You're actively choosing to suffer for longer. It doesn't matter how bad the crime is, just throw them in jail and forget about them. That's how you treat a criminal especially a sadistic one. Forgotten and sentenced to obscurity is the worst fate most of them can imagine, because then it's just them and the little hell they built for themselves.
 
2013-08-05 01:45:25 AM
doosh:

TFA is a farken autoplay Grrrgrgrgr!!

It is? I'm using Adblock, Flashblock and NoScript so it doesn't do that to me.


Can't Fark have a standing policy to NOT greenlight troll articles?!

Can't Fark users figure out how to use simple browser add-ons?
 
2013-08-05 01:55:37 AM

swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtFjKZgjIJ4
 
2013-08-05 02:01:01 AM

letrole: The execution of the sentence needs to be unpredictable. What fear is there in knowing that you will be fed and clothed and housed until a certain day, and then you will see death in what is promised to be an humane manner? Any number of cancer patients would be relieved to know they had a finite yet predictable number of well maintained and healthy years left.


That's how they do it in Japan. Far as I can tell, when is completely up to the warden. So death row prisoners spend years in solitary until one day the guards come for him.

Ikahoshi: The whole point is revenge, not justice. Someone killing themselves before the bureaucracy gets to, robs people of their revenge.


Friend with a history degree made a comment that originally the death penalty was not so much about justice, but as a way of showing the power of the state.  Which is why an execution tended to be a gruesome affair.  Now people aren't okay with the gruesome bits. I'm like, well if you're not willing to make it messy and nasty, why bother all.
 
2013-08-05 02:24:19 AM

Southern100: swingerofbirches: This to me is more proof that the death penalty is cruel and unusual.

Revenge in the moment is one thing. But the premeditated killing of a person so that the person knows the exact moment he will be killed and has to wait for it is another.

When I see those people who have gotten reprieves in the last hour and then finally are executed . . . think about the fact that multiple times they have faced the specter of their own death.

So my point is, even if you don't think the execution itself is immoral, what do you think about the premeditation of it? The waiting and the knowing?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtFjKZgjIJ4


For those who didn't watch, your clip featured Jim Carrey yelling, "Stop breaking the law asshole."

Here's the situation I am in: I am arguing in abolition of the government executing its own citizens. To me, that (execution)is breaking a law that should exist.

Of course everyone is against people murdering other people. If you saw a situation in which a person was going to murder another person and you could stop it, I assume you would try to if it weren't too much danger to you to do so.

What sane person wouldn't stop a murder?

It's not that people against the death penalty are for criminals murdering people. But that crime has already been committed. It cannot be stopped. But you canstop another murder (execution) from taking place.

I regard the two as the same. You try to stop all forms of people killing other people. But executions happen to be one where we are watching car crashes that haven't even happened yet in slow motion. By that I mean, we as a society are choosing our government to execute people who have committed crimes and who will commit them. That makes us the most premeditated type of murderers that can possibly exist. You can't deliberate more on an execution than we do through our political and judicial system. And yet we still do it. So how sane are we?

Knowing that we will execute criminals in the future and doing nothing about is not only not stopping that murder (the execution), it isn't stopping criminals from murdering either. It is simply adding to the body count. Look at countries without the death penalty. Many have far lower homicide rates than the US.

If you cared about innocent victims of crime, you would argue for something effective to prevent crime. Executions don't prevent crime. They are crime. It's not illegal. But it's a crime.

So to paraphrase Jim Carrey, "Stop supporting crime against people."
 
2013-08-05 02:44:57 AM

OgreMagi: BummerDuck: I never did understand why anyone would want to stop a murderer from committing suicide.

Suicide is against the law.

Actually, I think the reasoning is the entire formal procedure of an execution is required for proper justice.  A suicide subverts justice.

Personally, I say give the condemned inmate a rope and selection of poison pills so they can go early if they so choose.


IANAL, but my understanding is that there's something of a catch-22 involved.  See, in order to be executed, you have to be sane (because apparently it's cruel to execute an insane person, but it's dandy to execute a sane person).  But attempting suicide means you're insane, or at least not in your right mind.  So if you attempt to kill yourself, you can't be executed.

On second thing, this is probably totally wrong.  Maybe somebody else can explain it.
 
2013-08-05 02:45:59 AM

OgreMagi: gibbon1: OgreMagi: Personally, I say give the condemned inmate a rope and selection of poison pills so they can go early if they so choose.

If it were me, I'd give the condemn the option of death by slot machine.  You put the noose around them, make them strand over the trap door, then they pull the lever.  If they win they get some reduction in their sentence. Else whoops the long drop.

I like it.  You can even open the process up to betting on the outcome.


cf.drafthouse.com
Why stop there?
 
2013-08-05 04:04:51 AM

ciberido: apparently it's cruel to execute an insane person


Also IANAL.  From my limited GED in law, I think the law gives you an out if you were insane at the time you committed the crime.  If you knew what you were doing was wrong, you were not insane.  Also, during the trial you must understand the charges against you.  After that, I'm not so sure the law really cares.  You go nuts while locked up in solitaire, tough shiat.  You're still getting executed.  I actually don't have a problem with that (with the exception of Texas who shouldn't be allowed to execute anyone until they clean up their act).
 
2013-08-05 04:59:41 AM

swingerofbirches: For those who didn't watch, your clip featured Jim Carrey yelling, "Stop breaking the law asshole."

Here's the situation I am in: I am arguing in abolition of the government executing its own citizens. To me, that (execution)is breaking a law that should exist.

Of course everyone is against people murdering other people. If you saw a situation in which a person was going to murder another person and you could stop it, I assume you would try to if it weren't too much danger to you to do so.

What sane person wouldn't stop a murder?

It's not that people against the death penalty are for criminals murdering people. But that crime has already been committed. It cannot be stopped. But you canstop another murder (execution) from taking place.

I regard the two as the same. You try to stop all forms of people killing other people. But executions happen to be one where we are watching car crashes that haven't even happened yet in slow motion. By that I mean, we as a society are choosing our government to execute people who have committed crimes and who will commit them. That makes us the most premeditated type of murderers that can possibly exist. You can't deliberate more on an execution than we do through our political and judicial system. And yet we still do it. So how sane are we?

Knowing that we will execute criminals in the future and doing nothing about is not only not stopping that murder (the execution), it isn't stopping criminals from murdering either. It is simply adding to the body count. Look at countries without the death penalty. Many have far lower homicide rates than the US.

If you cared about innocent victims of crime, you would argue for something effective to prevent crime. Executions don't prevent crime. They are crime. It's not illegal. But it's a crime.

So to paraphrase Jim Carrey, "Stop supporting crime against people."


Except it's not crime against people.  Murder is the unlawful ending of a life, which is why self defense cases are not considered murders, as the ending of the attacker's life was lawful.

Let's face it, locking someone up is fine and well and good.  You are right, it's probably the most cruel and mind-breaking punishment you could inflict on many of the violent offenders in our prisons.  But the entire time they are there, the state is paying for them.  We have to have a place to put them, food on the table, medicine when they get sick, etc.  And on top of that, there's the chance, however small, of them escaping.

This leads to an odd situation... the very victims the person preyed on are now paying for his life to continue.  Taxpayer money comes from everyone, meaning the mother, brothers, sisters, dad, and other loved ones that murderer deprived are now paying for him to continue living, healthy and well cared for.  Where is the justice in that?  There isn't any, pure and simple.

Executions solve all 3 problems.  We don't have to keep as large of a prison, since we're cycling people out of it instead of keeping them for life, we don't have to pay for them after we execute them, and the people the person hurt get to know his life is ended and he will never hurt another person like he did them.  On top of that, we've removed a violent, very dangerous person from society in a permanent way instead of risking them escaping and causing more harm.

So your argument really doesn't have any leg to stand on.  Not only is it not a crime, as by definition any court-ordered punishment is legal, but it also is the more practical and sensible option.
 
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