If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Time)   We all have an old friend that we were once a lot closer with. Lately none of us have really had any use for this old companion. And though they are (almost entirely) gone, they shouldn't be forgotten   (entertainment.time.com) divider line 101
    More: Sad, history of music  
•       •       •

7872 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Aug 2013 at 11:50 AM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



101 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-08-04 09:04:19 AM
I don't play cassettes, but I have a adapter that allows me to connect my iPod to my car stereo. Works so much better that the radio frequency adapter I had before. But I still have my 8 track player (not in the car).
 
2013-08-04 09:08:43 AM
I never used cassettes much. They sounded like crap I stuck with vinyl until CD's were available
 
2013-08-04 09:10:11 AM
I still play cassettes that I recorded in the 70's. It's great hearing the crackle of vinyl.
 
2013-08-04 09:13:22 AM
Cassettes made sure you always had a pencil in your car.
 
2013-08-04 09:24:38 AM
Remember mixtapes? God, we were pathetic.
 
2013-08-04 09:26:35 AM
I have a high end rack mount cassette deck and I'll still blow a two track mix to a cassette and then back into the DAW.  No plug in can do what that does.
 
2013-08-04 09:40:38 AM

NewportBarGuy: Remember mixtapes? God, we were pathetic.


I



I remember trying to record songs off the radio with a second radio.

/ and my mother managing to call me half way through every song...
/ then I buy old songs on iTunes and they sound wrong for missing all the background noises.
 
2013-08-04 09:42:27 AM
I enjoyed cassettes in their day, but I'm glad they're gone. When I decided to switch over to CDs/DVDs, it was one of the best decisions I ever made. No more dealing with this crap:

i43.tinypic.com
 
2013-08-04 09:50:34 AM
The boomboxes of the 1980s could easily record a CD to a cassette tape. But as far as I know, there has not been an invention that would allow a person to have the music or conversations of a cassette tape transfered to a CD or a computer.
 
2013-08-04 09:55:53 AM

Kevin72: The boomboxes of the 1980s could easily record a CD to a cassette tape. But as far as I know, there has not been an invention that would allow a person to have the music or conversations of a cassette tape transfered to a CD or a computer.


There are converters for VHS and Super 8 video to digital, so I'm sure there's something for audio.
 
2013-08-04 10:00:20 AM

way south: I remember trying to record songs off the radio with a second radio.


Yup. After a while you got pretty good at starting and stopping before/after the DJ or commercials.

That's what I mean by pathetic. We all did it, but look at what we have now with all this digital crap. We were glued to the radio with our finger on the button trying to create a mix of songs we actually liked and had to wait through all the crap. heh... Man, that takes me back.

I remember the tapes I made for girls I liked. Yeah, that never ever worked out. Never.

"Ummm... OK, creepy kid. I'll just put this in the trash."

/Awkward teen.
 
2013-08-04 10:07:03 AM

Kevin72: The boomboxes of the 1980s could easily record a CD to a cassette tape. But as far as I know, there has not been an invention that would allow a person to have the music or conversations of a cassette tape transfered to a CD or a computer.


Line out of your cassette deck to line in on your Mac/PC, then launch your music software like Audacity or WireTap (free) and hit record then play your cassette. But why would you want to? Tape hiss? Really? You can do it with vinyl as well using an app like FinalVinyl
 
2013-08-04 10:09:03 AM

Kevin72: The boomboxes of the 1980s could easily record a CD to a cassette tape. But as far as I know, there has not been an invention that would allow a person to have the music or conversations of a cassette tape transfered to a CD or a computer.


Actually, it's called an RCA to 1/8" mini jack into the line in on your sound card and any given two track editor, some of them free.  Like Audacity.
 
2013-08-04 10:11:11 AM

Kevin72: The boomboxes of the 1980s could easily record a CD to a cassette tape. But as far as I know, there has not been an invention that would allow a person to have the music or conversations of a cassette tape transfered to a CD or a computer.


$39.95 at Wal Mart brought to you by the same folks that make the USB turntable.
 
2013-08-04 10:14:37 AM
I've always had a good stereo system.  With quality tapes, you could make a cassette that you could not distinguish from the source material.  Storing them in your car in the Florida heat would sure ruin them, though.

And there's nothing like and old-fashioned mix tape to let a friend know you really care.  Go ahead, point and laugh.  But it was true.
 
2013-08-04 10:18:19 AM

Earguy: I've always had a good stereo system.  With quality tapes, you could make a cassette that you could not distinguish from the source material.  Storing them in your car in the Florida heat would sure ruin them, though.

And there's nothing like and old-fashioned mix tape to let a friend know you really care.  Go ahead, point and laugh.  But it was true.


Wasn't it memorex that made some fairly expensive blank cassettes that were heat resistance.

Oh and if you really wanted to blow your friend's mind when you made a mix tape you included movie lines in between the songs, since your VCR was hooked up to your stereo.
 
2013-08-04 10:28:02 AM

Tom_Slick: Kevin72: The boomboxes of the 1980s could easily record a CD to a cassette tape. But as far as I know, there has not been an invention that would allow a person to have the music or conversations of a cassette tape transfered to a CD or a computer.

$39.95 at Wal Mart brought to you by the same folks that make the USB turntable.


No Walmarts in SF. Maybe on my next rare adventure out of the city.
 
2013-08-04 10:33:11 AM

Majick Thise: Kevin72: The boomboxes of the 1980s could easily record a CD to a cassette tape. But as far as I know, there has not been an invention that would allow a person to have the music or conversations of a cassette tape transfered to a CD or a computer.

Line out of your cassette deck to line in on your Mac/PC, then launch your music software like Audacity or WireTap (free) and hit record then play your cassette. But why would you want to? Tape hiss? Really? You can do it with vinyl as well using an app like FinalVinyl


Not so much mainstream music where Tubemate can make any youtube into an MP3. I have some music tapes from Thailand, Taiwan, and Hong Kong that haven't heard in ages. Also some taped conversations memorabilia. Sounds like the Walmart machine is easiest.
 
2013-08-04 10:37:49 AM
For everybody getting ready to transfer their old cassettes to digital audio files, I cannot overstate the importance of keeping the levels going in to the computer and whatever recording software out of the "red", as it were.  0 dBFS is max, and the distortion that will result of you slam the levels going in will make your tracks about as listenable as glassware being thrown against a brick wall.
 
2013-08-04 10:39:06 AM

Earguy: And there's nothing like and old-fashioned mix tape to let a friend know you really care. Go ahead, point and laugh. But it was true.


I was an OCD mixtape guy. If I had a 90-minute cassette that I knew was closer to 45:40 a side, I'd set the whole thing up so that side 1 ended at 45:38 or so, ending the side with a song with a fairly hard ending so that the tape would auto-reverse with the recipient hardly knowing there had been a break in the action. If the deck didn't have autoreverse, there was no fastforwarding needed to get to the start of side 2. Getting the length to work out while still maintaining the flow of the music could be a biatch.

Apparently I did a good job, since I've got three ex-girlfriends who've told me the one thing of mine they made sure to keep after we broke up was the mixtapes I made.
 
2013-08-04 10:48:35 AM

Majick Thise: I never used cassettes much. They sounded like crap I stuck with vinyl until CD's were available


But...but...what did you listen to in the car?  How did you mix music together for awkward displays of affection?
 
2013-08-04 10:52:48 AM

Lor M. Ipsum: But...but...what did you listen to in the car?


You gotta admit, radio was a lot better off when new artists were introduced by the DeeJays who actually programmed their own shows and people voted on what they liked with their wallets, not with a mouse click.  It's how most of the music that is the cornerstone of pop and rock got to be a cultural cornerstone to begin with.
 
2013-08-04 10:59:54 AM

Lor M. Ipsum: Majick Thise: I never used cassettes much. They sounded like crap I stuck with vinyl until CD's were available

But...but...what did you listen to in the car?  How did you mix music together for awkward displays of affection?


I made the occasional mix tape but always from my vinyl. Never had a stereo in the car good enough to allow me to complain about the crappy cassettes quality. I am old enough to have made the occasional mix tape onto an 8track tape... slightly better sound quality slightly worse physical/mechanical quality
 
2013-08-04 11:02:47 AM

bunner: people voted on what they liked with their wallets, not with a mouse click.


Yeah, but I remember the summer of 94 or 95 when it was absolutely nothing but Mariah Carey on every goddamned station ALL the time.

It wasn't all sunshine and rainbows. Same same for Whitney Houston.

I mean, I like their songs, but we got bombarded. Then again, Rhode Island only has 3 stations. So, YMMV.
 
2013-08-04 11:07:44 AM

NewportBarGuy: bunner: people voted on what they liked with their wallets, not with a mouse click.

Yeah, but I remember the summer of 94 or 95 when it was absolutely nothing but Mariah Carey on every goddamned station ALL the time.

It wasn't all sunshine and rainbows. Same same for Whitney Houston.

I mean, I like their songs, but we got bombarded. Then again, Rhode Island only has 3 stations. So, YMMV.


And I get that, but that's pretty much the heyday of corporate whore, one pipe 495609485 faucets radio.  I remember when you could hear, The Beatles, Neil Diamond, Black Sabbath, The Carpenters, Deep Purple and Daddy Dewdrop (Who?  Precisely) - in a row.  It just had to be a record people wanted to hear.  It just had to be a hit.  I remember when the music was new. The music isn't new anymore.  And it will only stay culturally relevant if we support new artists saying new things or old things in a new way with something more than a [+1] button.
 
2013-08-04 11:12:06 AM

Gulper Eel: Earguy: And there's nothing like and old-fashioned mix tape to let a friend know you really care. Go ahead, point and laugh. But it was true.

I was an OCD mixtape guy. If I had a 90-minute cassette that I knew was closer to 45:40 a side, I'd set the whole thing up so that side 1 ended at 45:38 or so, ending the side with a song with a fairly hard ending so that the tape would auto-reverse with the recipient hardly knowing there had been a break in the action. If the deck didn't have autoreverse, there was no fastforwarding needed to get to the start of side 2. Getting the length to work out while still maintaining the flow of the music could be a biatch.

Apparently I did a good job, since I've got three ex-girlfriends who've told me the one thing of mine they made sure to keep after we broke up was the mixtapes I made.


Ah, the Brotherhood of the Mixtape.  How we reaped the benefits.
 
2013-08-04 11:12:41 AM

bunner: I remember when the music was new. The music isn't new anymore. And it will only stay culturally relevant if we support new artists saying new things or old things in a new way with something more than a [+1] button.


Amen to that. There are a few good new bands/acts out there, you just have to look harder for them. At least for me, I just wind up falling into them through radio or friends recommendations. It's not all crap, but there's a lot of crap.
 
2013-08-04 11:13:54 AM

bunner: radio was a lot better off when new artists were introduced by the DeeJays who actually programmed their own shows and people voted on what they liked with their wallets, not with a mouse click


Hate to break the "old days were better" bubble, but that myth is just that: a myth. Radio DJ's have always had to pick from a playlist that was decided upon by music directors, record reps, consultants and so forth. Even in the "glory days" of the 70's, only the most popular DJ's had any type of creative control over their shows, and even that was limited to a great extent.

Sure, there have been a number of college stations and "experimental" FM stations that allowed much greater freedom to the DJ's, but none of those were ever market leaders or had strong ratings. Radio is a business to deliver a product, but that product is not for the listener: it's for the advertiser. The DJ's are as much a part of that product as the music, and always have been.
 
2013-08-04 11:15:49 AM

Man On A Mission: bunner: radio was a lot better off when new artists were introduced by the DeeJays who actually programmed their own shows and people voted on what they liked with their wallets, not with a mouse click

Hate to break the "old days were better" bubble, but that myth is just that: a myth. Radio DJ's have always had to pick from a playlist that was decided upon by music directors, record reps, consultants and so forth. Even in the "glory days" of the 70's, only the most popular DJ's had any type of creative control over their shows, and even that was limited to a great extent.

Sure, there have been a number of college stations and "experimental" FM stations that allowed much greater freedom to the DJ's, but none of those were ever market leaders or had strong ratings. Radio is a business to deliver a product, but that product is not for the listener: it's for the advertiser. The DJ's are as much a part of that product as the music, and always have been.


Anyone else here old enough to remember the payola scandals?
 
2013-08-04 11:20:37 AM

Man On A Mission: Even in the "glory days" of the 70's


I like to remind people who talk about the Glory Days of 1970s music to look at the Billboard charts from the 1970s.  The 70s music that is popular today, is not what was popular then.  Remember, Quaaludes were readily available and the designer drug of choice.
 
2013-08-04 11:22:04 AM

Man On A Mission: Hate to break the "old days were better" bubble,


Oh, not at all.  Please proceed.

Man On A Mission: Radio DJ's have always had to pick from a playlist that was decided upon by music directors, record reps, consultants and so forth. Even in the "glory days" of the 70's, only the most popular DJ's had any type of creative control over their shows, and even that was limited to a great extent


Ever hear of WMMS?  The lat '60s and '70s and early '80s were all about who could break the new hot acts on their station and the program directors went out of their way to hire people who could see them strolling down Main.  See, I've been in this music racket for a while.  Yeah, there's always been playlists, but they weren't wet sh* out of the ass of some dime store focus group whole cloth.  People would call the station and ask for stuff and the PDs and DeeJays listened

.

Man On A Mission: Radio is a business to deliver a product, but that product is not for the listener: it's for the advertiser. The DJ's are as much a part of that product as the music, and always have been.


Radio is a business to promote the products that made people listen as much as to promote the products from the merchants who kept the lights on.  No Arbs, no ads.  If radio always worked precisely as you stated, most of the artists that have gained iconhood  would have ended up working at FedEx or a chippy in Hull.  So, uh, yeah.  No.  You're wrong.  Or you don't have enough of a frame of reference, time wise, to go back before Cheap Channel became everybody's main pimp.
 
2013-08-04 11:23:22 AM

simplicimus: Anyone else here old enough to remember the payola scandals?


Sh*t, I remember when it was SOP after they learned to get around the gummint boys going over the books.  Mostly, it never worked because even if they played the piss out of it, if it didn't hit, it didn't hit.
 
2013-08-04 11:24:45 AM

Tom_Slick: Man On A Mission: Even in the "glory days" of the 70's

I like to remind people who talk about the Glory Days of 1970s music to look at the Billboard charts from the 1970s.  The 70s music that is popular today, is not what was popular then.  Remember, Quaaludes were readily available and the designer drug of choice.


I have, by way of a gift from a major label VP, the entire Billboard Hot 100 from 63 to 03 on an outboard HDD.  Interesting diorama.
 
2013-08-04 11:32:13 AM

bunner: You're wrong.  Or you don't have enough of a frame of reference, time wise, to go back before Cheap Channel became everybody's main pimp.


Well, considering I've worked in the business since 1982 (in programming and on-air), I have a feeling I know a lot more about how radio works -- and more importantly, how it's been mythologized over the years -- than most.

You can disagree all you want, but the "days when DJ's all picked their own music" simply never happened.   As I said, there were always a few exceptions, but they were not the big billers or ratings winners.

And you can kid yourself all you want but radio is now, and has been a for a very long time, a product for advertisers. You build a station to appeal to a specific demo and then sell that product to the advertisers that want to reach that demo.  If the product is working, you switch formats to something that does.
 
2013-08-04 11:37:41 AM

Man On A Mission: And you can kid yourself all you want but radio is now, and has been a for a very long time, a product for advertisers. You build a station to appeal to a specific demo and then sell that product to the advertisers that want to reach that demo.  If the product is working, you switch formats to something that does.


Yeah, I get the whorehouse as "SOP thing, but if you're trying to tell me that PDs and DeeJays never sat down and started structuring adds to allow for pushing buzz bands, all I can say is you should have gotten into radio a little earlier.  Because it's what made radio great, not Arb pumpers selling ads to muffler shops.
 
2013-08-04 11:40:54 AM
And yeah, I used to sell ads to muffler shops and amusement parks in a really nice suit AND work at the joints that produced the spots AND do a little radio.  I miss radio mattering.  Sue me.
 
2013-08-04 11:44:20 AM
Anyone know if Tom Petty's "Last DJ" ever got played on the radio? Lyrics here  http://www.lyricsdepot.com/tom-petty-the-heartbreakers/the-last-dj.ht m l .
 
2013-08-04 11:50:24 AM

simplicimus: Anyone know if Tom Petty's "Last DJ" ever got played on the radio? Lyrics here  http://www.lyricsdepot.com/tom-petty-the-heartbreakers/the-last-dj.ht m l .


IIRC: It was initially banned by Clear Channel for being "Anti-Radio", but it did get play on non-Clear Channel stations, some of which would proudly  announce that it was banned by Clear Channel.  Of course because of the bad press Clear Channel unbanned it.

/I think I am remembering that correctly it has been 10 years and I've killed a lot of brain cells.
 
2013-08-04 11:50:56 AM
This
static.tvtropes.org

Was ALWAYS more relevant to keeping rock and roll a growing cultural statement than his.

www.eagle-vision.tv

But there was a brief and shining moment when everybody got paid, artists had a bolthole and radio actually focused on being relevant.
 
2013-08-04 11:59:26 AM
1) Go to record store

2) buy cd/vinyl

3) remove cd/vinyl from packaging and insert into your stereo

4) record original media playback

5) replace original media to package and store until cassette goes bad.

I miss the days when preserving music that I purchased wasn't a criminal act.
 
2013-08-04 11:59:30 AM
I'll stick with my wax cylinder collection, thank you very much!
www.tinfoil.com
 
2013-08-04 12:00:31 PM
This is always relevant when talking about the good ole days of radio or music.
 
2013-08-04 12:01:06 PM

bunner: I have a high end rack mount cassette deck and I'll still blow a two track mix to a cassette and then back into the DAW.  No plug in can do what that does.


What effect does it have?

/been playing around with reaper in my home studio
 
2013-08-04 12:01:09 PM

NewportBarGuy: way south: I remember trying to record songs off the radio with a second radio.

Yup. After a while you got pretty good at starting and stopping before/after the DJ or commercials.

That's what I mean by pathetic. We all did it, but look at what we have now with all this digital crap. We were glued to the radio with our finger on the button trying to create a mix of songs we actually liked and had to wait through all the crap. heh... Man, that takes me back.

I remember the tapes I made for girls I liked. Yeah, that never ever worked out. Never.

"Ummm... OK, creepy kid. I'll just put this in the trash."

/Awkward teen.


Always start with "Space age love song"
 
2013-08-04 12:03:06 PM
Snapper Carr:

I miss the days when preserving music that I purchased wasn't a criminal act.

Look at some of your album covers, find this:

files.abovetopsecret.com
 
2013-08-04 12:07:45 PM

Head_Shot: bunner: I have a high end rack mount cassette deck and I'll still blow a two track mix to a cassette and then back into the DAW.  No plug in can do what that does.

What effect does it have?

/been playing around with reaper in my home studio


It's sort of like the blur tool in PhotoShop.  Hit it at about -2dBV to +4 dbV and blow it through a mild multiband compression setting.  I recommend PSP Vintage Warmer.  Port it back to the DAW from the cassette.  Tell me what you think.  You're gonna need a good deck and good tape, though.  An old Panasonic and some gas station compact cassettes from the '90s ain't gonna help.
 
2013-08-04 12:07:46 PM

NewportBarGuy: I remember the tapes I made for girls I liked. Yeah, that never ever worked out. Never.

"Ummm... OK, creepy kid. I'll just put this in the trash."

/Awkward teen.


Sure worked for me.   I still make mix CDs for friends, though I'm no longer trying to get closer to girls with them.  Still, friends like them and thank me years later.
 
2013-08-04 12:17:57 PM
For usability purposes, CDs were a huge step back from cassettes. They handled like tiny records, skipped constantly, and had to be put back into their gem cases or end up destroyed. The most useful portion of the disc for handling and labeling had a huge spindle hole punched through it, ensuring the industry would never figure out how to label the things consistently. Often, the user would have to squint at tiny print to figure out what CD they were holding. And, of course, they weren't re-recordable, like cassettes were. The only benefit they offered the user over records when they first came out was smaller size. They offered random playback over cassettes, but you could argue that killed the album format, and was already available with 8 tracks anyway (kind of).

The most useful physical format of all time was/is minidisc.

/That Guy
 
2013-08-04 12:19:31 PM
I remember the first year of BASIC computer programming in high school. 1980. We had a lab of RadioShack TRS-80's with extrenal C-60 recorders. It was a huge step up from a couple years prior when everything was recorded to hollerith punch cards. I remember you had to purchase or bring in your own C-60 cassette to save your work.

ctb.kantl.be
 
2013-08-04 12:21:18 PM

Earguy: Snapper Carr:

I miss the days when preserving music that I purchased wasn't a criminal act.

Look at some of your album covers, find this:

[files.abovetopsecret.com image 350x289]



That was a BPI campaign. The RIAA grumbled a bit but really didn't raise a stink if memory serves until DAT's became commercially available
 
Displayed 50 of 101 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report