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(Examiner)   One of the biggest deterrents to never committing a crime and never getting locked up is trashed in Illinois. Gov. Quinn signs a new law which gives businesses tax credits of up to $1500 a year if - get this - they hire an ex-felon   (examiner.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Illinois, Pat Quinn  
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775 clicks; posted to Politics » on 04 Aug 2013 at 11:10 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-04 08:38:18 AM  
The Feds already give a $2,400 tax credit plus a free $5,000 bond to anyone who hires a person with a felony conviction. There must really be a surplus of ex-felons in Illinois..
 
2013-08-04 08:47:02 AM  

simplicimus: The Feds already give a $2,400 tax credit plus a free $5,000 bond to anyone who hires a person with a felony conviction. There must really be a surplus of ex-felons in Illinois..


Illinois lawmakers generally seem to need this kind of assistance as they leave government.
 
2013-08-04 08:47:19 AM  
He must be preparing for the release of his predecessors, Gov. Blagojevich and Gov. Ryan.
 
NFA
2013-08-04 08:49:52 AM  
So who created of this Republicans only jobs program?
 
2013-08-04 09:03:25 AM  
 "40 percent of the adult population in Illinois is an ex-felon which equates to some-four million persons."

Raise your hands if not an ex-felon.
 
2013-08-04 09:16:07 AM  
Regarding the headline, it's is very difficult for a person with a felony conviction to get employment and lodging. And, from what I've seen, impossible if the felony is a sex crime.
 
2013-08-04 09:26:12 AM  
Newsflash:  This is not news, at least not here in PA.
 
2013-08-04 09:33:23 AM  

BunkyBrewman: Newsflash:  This is not news, at least not here in PA.


Well, here in Texas, the state chips in nothing, so it's just the Federal aid.
 
2013-08-04 09:38:00 AM  
It's not a good idea to encourage employers to make an effort to fold felons back into tax-paying society?

Way to go, Smitty! You're a big fat, f*cking idiot!
 
2013-08-04 09:40:29 AM  
Yeah, because creating perpetual poverty and closing all doors to a job for felons works out REALLY well.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-04 09:48:42 AM  

hardinparamedic: Yeah, because creating perpetual poverty and closing all doors to a job for felons works out REALLY well.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x219]


Part of the problem is that many employers stop at the "have you been convicted of a felony" checkbox. There's no granularity in type of felony as relates to job in question, much less the seriousness of the offense. That and it's pretty easy to get become a felon in a lot a states. Drunk and pissing on a wall? Could turn out to be public indecency and presto, sex crime.
 
2013-08-04 09:53:05 AM  

simplicimus: Part of the problem is that many employers stop at the "have you been convicted of a felony" checkbox. There's no granularity in type of felony as relates to job in question, much less the seriousness of the offense. That and it's pretty easy to get become a felon in a lot a states. Drunk and pissing on a wall? Could turn out to be public indecency and presto, sex crime.


Funny thing? The same people who scream loudest about this as a negative will no doubt be the same ones who complain about food stamps and medicaid. But, they're perfectly fine creating an environment where a criminal STAYS on our tax dollars because it's a "deterrent". It makes no goddamn sense.
 
2013-08-04 10:01:31 AM  

hardinparamedic: Yeah, because creating perpetual poverty and closing all doors to a job for felons works out REALLY well.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x219]


Ex-felons are 1% of the population and growing fast.  Talk about a drag on an economy.
 
2013-08-04 10:08:12 AM  

Deep Contact:  "40 percent of the adult population in Illinois is an ex-felon which equates to some-four million persons."

Raise your hands if not an ex-felon.


4/10. You made me click the link.
 
2013-08-04 10:11:57 AM  
More Democratic pandering to their voter base... Get the felons to vote, and block U.S. military and veterans from voting, and you'd have 100% Democratic elections.
 
2013-08-04 10:14:21 AM  

NewportBarGuy: simplicimus: Part of the problem is that many employers stop at the "have you been convicted of a felony" checkbox. There's no granularity in type of felony as relates to job in question, much less the seriousness of the offense. That and it's pretty easy to get become a felon in a lot a states. Drunk and pissing on a wall? Could turn out to be public indecency and presto, sex crime.

Funny thing? The same people who scream loudest about this as a negative will no doubt be the same ones who complain about food stamps and medicaid. But, they're perfectly fine creating an environment where a criminal STAYS on our tax dollars because it's a "deterrent". It makes no goddamn sense.


Hey, those private sector run prisons need clients too. Why do you hate the free enterprise system?
 
2013-08-04 10:16:33 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: hardinparamedic: Yeah, because creating perpetual poverty and closing all doors to a job for felons works out REALLY well.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x219]

Ex-felons are 1% of the population and growing fast.  Talk about a drag on an economy.


I'm living through this with my step-son. Non-violent felon, no drugs, no sex crimes. The Dept. of corrections has a list of places that rent to felons, and these places are not in good neighborhoods. Jobs are nearly impossible to get. It gets to be a drag on society due to social costs and high recidivism rates (prisons cost money).
 
2013-08-04 10:17:11 AM  

NewportBarGuy: It's not a good idea to encourage employers to make an effort to fold felons back into tax-paying society?

Way to go, Smitty! You're a big fat, f*cking idiot!


Perhaps the Subtard is a shareholder of The GEO Group and needs lots of repeat offenders to generate business?
 
2013-08-04 10:20:18 AM  

GeneralJim: More Democratic pandering to their voter base... Get the felons to vote, and block U.S. military and veterans from voting, and you'd have 100% Democratic elections.


http://www.opensecrets.org/news/2012/10/armed-forces-show-overwhelmi ng -supp.html
 
2013-08-04 10:26:59 AM  

GeneralJim: More Democratic pandering to their voter base... Get the felons to vote, and block U.S. military and veterans from voting, and you'd have 100% Democratic elections.


Is using non-sequiturs the new trolling method? Cause that's not pertinent to the article in question.
 
2013-08-04 10:36:42 AM  

GeneralJim: More Democratic pandering to their voter base... Get the felons to vote, and block U.S. military and veterans from voting, and you'd have 100% Democratic elections.


Take notes people. THIS is how you troll.
 
2013-08-04 10:39:56 AM  
Instead of a cash bonus, how about an insurance policy to cover whatever damage the ex-felon causes?  I'm not saying it's a sure losing proposition, but the risk is higher.  And yes, there should be a difference between high-risk and low-risk convicts.
 
2013-08-04 10:42:30 AM  

Earguy: Instead of a cash bonus, how about an insurance policy to cover whatever damage the ex-felon causes?  I'm not saying it's a sure losing proposition, but the risk is higher.  And yes, there should be a difference between high-risk and low-risk convicts.


That's where the Fed's free $5,000 bond comes in. I'm sure higher levels are available from private companies.
 
2013-08-04 10:50:12 AM  

Earguy: And yes, there should be a difference between high-risk and low-risk convicts.


I'm totally fine with that.
 
2013-08-04 11:09:38 AM  

simplicimus: Earguy: Instead of a cash bonus, how about an insurance policy to cover whatever damage the ex-felon causes?  I'm not saying it's a sure losing proposition, but the risk is higher.  And yes, there should be a difference between high-risk and low-risk convicts.

That's where the Fed's free $5,000 bond comes in. I'm sure higher levels are available from private companies.


What, read articles and posts?  On Fark?  Pfft.
 
2013-08-04 11:14:44 AM  
No, you see, this is bad because an ex-felon with a job is less likely to end up back in prison, which means less profit for the privately-run corporate prison system.
 
2013-08-04 11:18:05 AM  
Good use of money.

Combating recidivism by helping ex-cons get stable employment and become contributing members of society should be a governmental priority.

Certainly much less expensive than the police work, court work, and prison expense of dealing with repeat offenders.
 
2013-08-04 11:23:42 AM  
Has anyone pointed out Subby is an idiot yet?
 
2013-08-04 11:24:52 AM  

simplicimus: The Feds already give a $2,400 tax credit plus a free $5,000 bond to anyone who hires a person with a felony conviction. There must really be a surplus of ex-felons in Illinois..


More like every state has a surplus of unemployed ex-cons. Who tend to re-con in some cases due to that unemployment. Though I doubt a $1500 tax break will change that very much.
 
2013-08-04 11:32:46 AM  
This is window-dressing that ignores the structural problem of the drug war, it will be abused by politically-connected Illinois politicians and contractors, and Illinois can't afford this at the moment.  A better idea would be to stop making people felons and jailing them to the tune of $50,000 a year.

This, along with Quinn's opposition to the bipartisan concealed-carry statute, is nothing more than pandering to his Cook County base to shore up support for the Democratic primary.
 
2013-08-04 11:33:08 AM  

FuturePastNow: simplicimus: The Feds already give a $2,400 tax credit plus a free $5,000 bond to anyone who hires a person with a felony conviction. There must really be a surplus of ex-felons in Illinois..

More like every state has a surplus of unemployed ex-cons. Who tend to re-con in some cases due to that unemployment. Though I doubt a $1500 tax break will change that very much.


Yeah, there's a vicious cycle going on. Few places rent to felons, and you need money to rent. To earn money, you need a job. To get a job, you probably need a residence more specific than "under the 4th street bridge".
There are websites that are felon friendly, such as  http://www.xamire.com/felony-friendly/texas/houston
 
2013-08-04 11:33:39 AM  
It's a well-proven fact that those about to commit a robbery or murder someone in the heat of the moment always stop to consider their future job prospects.  You're right and aren't an idiot who doesn't understand human psychology at all, Submitter.
 
2013-08-04 11:34:25 AM  
I see my work in mocking Subby is already done.
 
2013-08-04 11:42:09 AM  

BunkyBrewman: Newsflash:  This is not news, at least not here in PA.


and                          "                  "    "   "      "       "    "      "       "    "   OH
 
2013-08-04 11:44:18 AM  

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: It's a well-proven fact that those about to commit a robbery or murder someone in the heat of the moment always stop to consider their future job prospects.  You're right and aren't an idiot who doesn't understand human psychology at all, Submitter.


I get murder, but who commits robbery without some form of intent?  Is there actually such a thing as second degree robbery in your state?  Because that's weird.  I mean, it kind of tends to require equipping yourself and selecting a location in advance, at minimum.
 
2013-08-04 11:46:16 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: hardinparamedic: Yeah, because creating perpetual poverty and closing all doors to a job for felons works out REALLY well.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x219]

Ex-felons are 1% of the population and growing fast.  Talk about a drag on an economy.



its worse (add the ones on parole and juvies)

In total, 6,977,700 adults were under correctional supervision (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Probation">probation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parole">parole, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jail">jail, or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prison">prison) in 2011 - about 2.9% of adults in the U.S. resident population.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_S tates#cite_n ote-bjs.gov-11">[11]
In addition, there were 70,792 juveniles in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Youth_incarceration_in_the_United_States" >juvenile detention in 2010.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States# cite_n ote-cjrp-12">[12]
 
2013-08-04 11:47:22 AM  

simplicimus: Part of the problem is that many employers stop at the "have you been convicted of a felony" checkbox. There's no granularity in type of felony as relates to job in question, much less the seriousness of the offense. That and it's pretty easy to get become a felon in a lot a states. Drunk and pissing on a wall? Could turn out to be public indecency and presto, sex crime.


Politicians never want to get smeared as "soft on crime", so there's a general trend towards more and more things being felonies rather than misdemeanors, and prison terms getting longer.

Well, for blue-collar crime.  Financial crimes still result in brief jaunts to country clubs and/or fines much smaller than the profits made from said crimes.  Politicians, for some reason, seem hesitant to create harsh mandatory minimums for bribery, embezzlement, insider trading. etc.
 
2013-08-04 11:48:41 AM  
So uh what should we do with them if they can't get jobs?

I guess we can wait for them to become so desperate they commit another crime and put them back in jail. That creates jobs...I guess. Why not mix the two? Ex-felons become prison guards. What could possibly go wrong?
 
2013-08-04 11:49:11 AM  
Deterrent?
But I've been told time and again that laws don't stop criminals, because, duh, they're criminals.
Or does that only work for gun control?
 
2013-08-04 11:50:04 AM  
I have no idea what that headline is SUPPOSED to mean because it was written with all the clarity of a jar of mud, but it seems to imply that this is a bad thing.

Felon is not automatically equal to you gonna get raped in your cubicle. I would have no discomfort while working alongside most non-violent drug offenders who got nailed with a bullshiat felony for their recreational choices.

Jim_Callahan: I get murder, but who commits robbery without some form of intent? Is there actually such a thing as second degree robbery in your state? Because that's weird. I mean, it kind of tends to require equipping yourself and selecting a location in advance, at minimum.


I suppose you could rob somebody after killing them in the heat of the moment. In that case there could have been no initial plan to commit either crime.
 
2013-08-04 11:51:13 AM  

NewportBarGuy: It's not a good idea to encourage employers to make an effort to fold felons back into tax-paying society?

Way to go, Smitty! You're a big fat, f*cking idiot!


Big load of this.
 
2013-08-04 11:51:25 AM  
If deterrents worked in preventing crime, crime would have been abolished much earlier in human history.  You know, when we used to gut common criminals in the city square and held hanging day celebrations.

We have always known crime and economic prosperity have always been linked.  It's why we've seen upticks since 2007.  Sticks never work, because humans always think that sticks don;t apply to them, or they'll be able to jump around the sticks.  Carrots?  Carrots always work.
 
2013-08-04 11:51:57 AM  

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: It's a well-proven fact that those about to commit a robbery or murder someone in the heat of the moment always stop to consider their future job prospects.  You're right and aren't an idiot who doesn't understand human psychology at all, Submitter.


It's intended to address recidivism.  When someone gets out of prison and can't find employment even when they make an honest effort, they start to consider alternatives for earning money and filling their day.

Some go direct to the alternatives, of course, but right now the system largely closes the door to honest work for ex-felons.
 
2013-08-04 11:52:47 AM  

Jim_Callahan: I get murder, but who commits robbery without some form of intent?


As a general rule, people who commit crimes are either:
1) Engaged in the heat of the moment and not making rational decisions
2) Don't believe that they're going to get caught and held accountable
3) Or don't  care if they're caught and held accountable

Let's think about a violation pretty much everybody commits- speeding. Who here actually knows the exact penalty in your state for speeding? I am aware that there  is a penalty, but I don't know what it is. And when I do speed (because everybody does), I'm not weighing this penalty against the convenience (mostly, when I'm speeding, I'm weighing the speed of the traffic around me and the road conditions).
 
2013-08-04 11:52:48 AM  

MisterRonbo: Deterrent?
But I've been told time and again that laws don't stop criminals, because, duh, they're criminals.
Or does that only work for gun control?


If you outlaw murder, only criminals will commit murders.
 
2013-08-04 11:53:45 AM  

chimp_ninja: It's intended to address recidivism. When someone gets out of prison and can't find employment even when they make an honest effort, they start to consider alternatives for earning money and filling their day.


I think that was the point. Subby seems to be implying that some people don't commit crimes because it would look bad on their resume. Subby is an idiot.
 
2013-08-04 11:57:58 AM  

Fark It: This is window-dressing that ignores the structural problem of the drug war, it will be abused by politically-connected Illinois politicians and contractors, and Illinois can't afford this at the moment.  A better idea would be to stop making people felons and jailing them to the tune of $50,000 a year.

This, along with Quinn's opposition to the bipartisan concealed-carry statute, is nothing more than pandering to his Cook County base to shore up support for the Democratic primary.


I don't know about your second paragraph, but your first one is right on the money. This is certainly better than nothing, because being the world's most prolific jailor it is utterly insane that we also tend to keep our convicts locked into a cycle of poverty - which leads to more crime.

But this is just flossing over the REAL problem which is... we're the world's most prolific jailor! We need to end this horrid "war on drugs" and ban the for-profit prison industry.
 
2013-08-04 11:58:10 AM  

Jim_Callahan: I get murder, but who commits robbery without some form of intent? Is there actually such a thing as second degree robbery in your state? Because that's weird. I mean, it kind of tends to require equipping yourself and selecting a location in advance, at minimum.


CSB:

I'm walking down Turk street, in the ghettotastic Tenderloin District in San Francisco. Middle aged white dude in a cheap sportcoat is passed out in a bus shelter, with a stack of 20s visible peeking out the top of the side pocket.

It's only a couple of blocks from Union Square's hotels, I figure he's a tourist that wandered a couple of blocks the wrong way. "Buddy, buddy, you need to wake up, not a good place to be sleeping"

Doesn't work. "Dude, if you don't wake up, I'm calling 911 and getting the paramedics or cops down here. Last chance, want to open your eyes?"

One I cracks open slightly, and in the most irritated (and quite sober) growl possible says, "I am a cop."

And I notice the sedan across the street and half a dozen or so cars down, with two guys staring at me. "Oh."

/csb

And there's your no-intent robbery.
 
2013-08-04 11:59:27 AM  
GeneralJim: More Democratic pandering to their voter base... Get the felons to vote, and block U.S. military and veterans from voting, and you'd have 100% Democratic elections. DEPDERPDERPDERPDERP
 
2013-08-04 11:59:57 AM  

t3knomanser: Jim_Callahan: I get murder, but who commits robbery without some form of intent?

As a general rule, people who commit crimes are either:
1) Engaged in the heat of the moment and not making rational decisions
2) Don't believe that they're going to get caught and held accountable
3) Or don't  care if they're caught and held accountable


For my step-son, it was 2).
 
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