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(Deadspin)   Minor league baseball player strikes out on one pitch. Yes, you read that correctly (w/video)   (deadspin.com) divider line 64
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4734 clicks; posted to Sports » on 04 Aug 2013 at 9:54 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-04 08:11:27 AM
Amateur.

/One, two, three strikes you're out!
 
2013-08-04 08:18:33 AM
Look, I know it's just AA baseball on TV, but do you think the broadcasters could be bothered to pay attention and figure out WTF just happened???
 
2013-08-04 08:22:40 AM
Does that cut both ways? Because I'm imagining Steve Trachsel getting to a 3-2 count on Chuck Knoblauch without a single pitch being thrown.
 
2013-08-04 09:41:18 AM
The guy must have said something to piss off the ump. He really wasn't outside the box very long.
 
2013-08-04 09:56:09 AM

Three Crooked Squirrels: The guy must have said something to piss off the ump. He really wasn't outside the box very long.


Yeah. And that first pitch was definitely outside. Still, I'd like to see more of this game management from MLB umpires. Get in the box, on the rubber, and let's go.
 
2013-08-04 09:58:44 AM
"There's no crying in baseball!"  Nice job by the scoreboard operators.
 
2013-08-04 09:59:49 AM
I like how you could hear the stadium playing Tom Hanks "there's no crying in baseball" clip after he was tossed
 
Slu
2013-08-04 10:12:54 AM
Wow. That was incredibly boring.
 
2013-08-04 10:14:08 AM

FrancoFile: "There's no crying in baseball!"  Nice job by the scoreboard operators.


And you don't argue balls and strikes. What's the third rule?
 
2013-08-04 10:14:37 AM

FriarReb98: Look, I know it's just AA baseball on TV, but do you think the broadcasters could be bothered to pay attention and figure out WTF just happened???



I think they missed the second strike initially, and assumed the guy just got tossed on what should have been a 1-0 pitch. ;)

/Headed out to my first minor league game in 20 or so years.
//Go Aquasox!
 
2013-08-04 10:35:41 AM
Umpires can go both ways, either a batter umpire or a pitchers umpire. Most pitchers will try to dot a corner, and continue to move his ball outside until the umpire calls it a ball. First batter to whine pretty much sets his team up because that will piss off an umpire almost instantly.
Then again I've seen umpires with strike zones so small unless its over the middle of the plate with no movement its a ball, which is frustrating when you rely on movement and speed especially with hitting corners.

/quite a few MLB umpires I question their strike zone, I think deadspin once ran an article on the umpires and their strike zones, it was kind of obvious the most hated umpires are ones with the crappiest strike zones (mind the fact they are also the ones who tend to blow calls).
 
2013-08-04 10:39:34 AM

Slu: Wow. That was incredibly boring.


At least it was over quickly and not a 90+ minute kickball bore-fest.
 
2013-08-04 10:45:07 AM

Misconduc: Umpires can go both ways, either a batter umpire or a pitchers umpire. Most pitchers will try to dot a corner, and continue to move his ball outside until the umpire calls it a ball. First batter to whine pretty much sets his team up because that will piss off an umpire almost instantly.
Then again I've seen umpires with strike zones so small unless its over the middle of the plate with no movement its a ball, which is frustrating when you rely on movement and speed especially with hitting corners.

/quite a few MLB umpires I question their strike zone, I think deadspin once ran an article on the umpires and their strike zones, it was kind of obvious the most hated umpires are ones with the crappiest strike zones (mind the fact they are also the ones who tend to blow calls).


It boggles the mind that (although given baseball's aversion to change - not really) that we havent gone to an electronic means of calling balls and strikes.  Still plenty for the umpires to do but "figuring out what's a ball and what's a strike" on any given day should not be part of the game.  I'm reasonably sure it wouldnt even change the statistics of the game that much -  as you mentioned sometimes the pitcher is forced to grove one right down the middle to get a called strike, other times (especially if the pitcher is a "big name" kind of guy) throwing it into the right time zone is all it takes, especially on strike 3.
 
2013-08-04 10:49:44 AM
Hey, a Vinnie Catricala sighting.  That guy used to be a legit prospect.  Now 24 and OPSing .563 in AA ball.  Maybe he's frustrated with the way his career has been going.
 
2013-08-04 11:01:22 AM
I'd like to see more of this. I hate watching a batter who has to adjust both gloves and his jock strap after every pitch before stepping back in and digging in his cleats (and usually it's the guy who can't hit worth a damn anyway). I'd like to see more umpires saying "no" when the guy asks for a Time Out (which, by the way, is at the umpire's discretion, not the player's).

As for those people saying "he didn't wait long enough" because 14 seconds is less than 17 seconds: every second he is out of the box is holding up the game. The pitcher can't reasonably begin his process until the batter is in. Plus he'd already been stood in the box arguing the call for several seconds before he stepped out. The pitcher would have been within his rights to see another strike down there while he was arguing, since nobody had called time out.

And on top of all that, he's some double-A scrub upset about a call. Get in the box and get on with the freaking game, you baby.
 
2013-08-04 11:16:49 AM
Oh, this is the thread where people who don't like baseball suggest what they think would make baseball better.

This ump is terrible.  The guy was out of the box for about three seconds before he called that second strike.  Standing in the batter's box and arguing shouldn't count towards that; he was still in the box then.
 
2013-08-04 11:29:40 AM
That umpire had a real short fuse!
 
2013-08-04 11:30:24 AM
From the comments in TFA:

"Adam Dunn would kill for this kind of efficiency."

And in reply:

"+.210"
 
2013-08-04 11:30:52 AM

Fizpez: Misconduc: Umpires can go both ways, either a batter umpire or a pitchers umpire. Most pitchers will try to dot a corner, and continue to move his ball outside until the umpire calls it a ball. First batter to whine pretty much sets his team up because that will piss off an umpire almost instantly.
Then again I've seen umpires with strike zones so small unless its over the middle of the plate with no movement its a ball, which is frustrating when you rely on movement and speed especially with hitting corners.

/quite a few MLB umpires I question their strike zone, I think deadspin once ran an article on the umpires and their strike zones, it was kind of obvious the most hated umpires are ones with the crappiest strike zones (mind the fact they are also the ones who tend to blow calls).

It boggles the mind that (although given baseball's aversion to change - not really) that we havent gone to an electronic means of calling balls and strikes.  Still plenty for the umpires to do but "figuring out what's a ball and what's a strike" on any given day should not be part of the game.  I'm reasonably sure it wouldnt even change the statistics of the game that much -  as you mentioned sometimes the pitcher is forced to grove one right down the middle to get a called strike, other times (especially if the pitcher is a "big name" kind of guy) throwing it into the right time zone is all it takes, especially on strike 3.


My biggest problem has always been blown calls, balls and strikes are one thing but they really need to work on getting plays called correctly, and I doubt it will ever happen. What I always wanted to have happen was have an umpire watching the game via television near the field, all the umpires have microphones that are connected to him, if they have a questionable call they can take 1 minute out to replay it.

For example last night, Yankees had an infield hit that was clearly safe by a whole foot, the runner was called out problem was the umpire didn't get into position fast enough to make a decent call, he basically saw the ball in the glove and could not see the runners foot.
If there were an umpire up in the booth, he could of reversed the call to make it correct.

/who am I kidding, it won't happen anytime soon - Home run calls are one thing, but when every other game has a blown call its starting to really get annoying.
 
2013-08-04 11:45:05 AM

Three Crooked Squirrels: The guy must have said something to piss off the ump. He really wasn't outside the box very long.


You never turn around and look at the ump to argue the call before the at bat is over. Proper baseball etiquette requires that you badmouth the call and/or the umpire under your breath while looking at the pitcher.
 
2013-08-04 11:46:49 AM
We have finally found Angel Hernandez's replacement.
 
2013-08-04 11:58:27 AM

Dafatone: Oh, this is the thread where people who don't like baseball suggest what they think would make baseball better.

This ump is terrible.  The guy was out of the box for about three seconds before he called that second strike.  Standing in the batter's box and arguing shouldn't count towards that; he was still in the box then.


Yes it should, because stop farking arguing.
 
2013-08-04 12:02:22 PM
That ump is a dick.
 
2013-08-04 12:02:43 PM

Boxcutta: Three Crooked Squirrels: The guy must have said something to piss off the ump. He really wasn't outside the box very long.

You never turn around and look at the ump to argue the call before the at bat is over. Proper baseball etiquette requires that you badmouth the call and/or the umpire under your breath while looking at the pitcher.


This is true - you don't try to show up the ump, and some umpires are totally serious about that.  Pointing your bat to where you thought the ball was is about as bad as that particular transgression gets, too.

The amusing part is that if you listen to the announcers, and watch the crowd, it's pretty clear that nobody even realized the batter spoke to the ump.
 
2013-08-04 12:08:23 PM

Boxcutta: Three Crooked Squirrels: The guy must have said something to piss off the ump. He really wasn't outside the box very long.

You never turn around and look at the ump to argue the call before the at bat is over. Proper baseball etiquette requires that you badmouth the call and/or the umpire under your breath while looking at the pitcher.


I've always heard this too.  Every time I see a a batter just look at the ump on a questionable call I expect the next pitch to be a strike.  75% of the time it is.
 
2013-08-04 12:21:29 PM

PacificaFitz: Boxcutta: Three Crooked Squirrels: The guy must have said something to piss off the ump. He really wasn't outside the box very long.

You never turn around and look at the ump to argue the call before the at bat is over. Proper baseball etiquette requires that you badmouth the call and/or the umpire under your breath while looking at the pitcher.

I've always heard this too.  Every time I see a a batter just look at the ump on a questionable call I expect the next pitch to be a strike.  75% of the time it is.


If a pitcher's stuff is already baffling you, you're probably getting a strike anyway.  I've seen respectful veteran players ask an ump about location of a pitch, nod, then get back to business without getting particularly punished on the next call.  AA player ignoring repeated instructions to get back in the box; ignoring a called second strike?  Naw, the next pitch could have been rolled on the ground into the dugout and it was going to be a called third strike.

You want to call balls and strikes, be an umpire, not a player.
 
2013-08-04 12:22:03 PM

dugitman: Three Crooked Squirrels: The guy must have said something to piss off the ump. He really wasn't outside the box very long.

Yeah. And that first pitch was definitely outside. Still, I'd like to see more of this game management from MLB umpires. Get in the box, on the rubber, and let's go.


There is a fine line between effective game management (which I fully support) and the umpire punishing a player (which should never happen).

I am willing to bet money this would never have happened if the player had not complained about the call. And if the umpire did not feel that the player's actions warranted an ejection, then he shouldn't have done anything. As stupid as the hitter was, the umpire should never be affecting the game to get back at a player for actions that did not warrant action per the rulebook.

I want umpires to start enforcing rule 6.02 (and, at least the spirit of, 8.04), but it has to be made clear in advance and as a league wide effort to enforce it on a regular basis. Not as an excuse for an umpire to punish a batter for being a douche.

As to the time consideration, a strict following of the rules are that the moment he stepped out of the box, he violated the rules and was liable for a strike call (you cannot step out of the box except in certain circumstances). The umpires warning before calling strike two is an option for the umpire. Th third strike requires a reasonable opportunity to take his position, and the hitter made it clear he was not moving to obey the umpire. If the rule is being enforced this was a legitimate call.
 
2013-08-04 12:25:17 PM

PacificaFitz: Boxcutta: Three Crooked Squirrels: The guy must have said something to piss off the ump. He really wasn't outside the box very long.

You never turn around and look at the ump to argue the call before the at bat is over. Proper baseball etiquette requires that you badmouth the call and/or the umpire under your breath while looking at the pitcher.

I've always heard this too.  Every time I see a a batter just look at the ump on a questionable call I expect the next pitch to be a strike.  75% of the time it is.


Smart batters don't show up the umpire, no matter how bad the call.

I've seen it work the other way, too.  I remember Greg Maddux didn't get the call on a corner pitch he wanted.  Instead of catching the baseball and staring down the ump like a lot of pitchers do, he just went about his business.  Then, in the next half-inning when he was up, he stepped into the batter's box, kept his eyes on the pitcher, and had his say against the umpire.  Veteran move.  Steve Stone knew what was going down and pointed it out while it was happening, so the cameras were able to close in on Maddux telling the ump he blew one.
 
2013-08-04 12:26:07 PM

Fizpez: Misconduc: Umpires can go both ways, either a batter umpire or a pitchers umpire. Most pitchers will try to dot a corner, and continue to move his ball outside until the umpire calls it a ball. First batter to whine pretty much sets his team up because that will piss off an umpire almost instantly.
Then again I've seen umpires with strike zones so small unless its over the middle of the plate with no movement its a ball, which is frustrating when you rely on movement and speed especially with hitting corners.

/quite a few MLB umpires I question their strike zone, I think deadspin once ran an article on the umpires and their strike zones, it was kind of obvious the most hated umpires are ones with the crappiest strike zones (mind the fact they are also the ones who tend to blow calls).

It boggles the mind that (although given baseball's aversion to change - not really) that we havent gone to an electronic means of calling balls and strikes.  Still plenty for the umpires to do but "figuring out what's a ball and what's a strike" on any given day should not be part of the game.  I'm reasonably sure it wouldnt even change the statistics of the game that much -  as you mentioned sometimes the pitcher is forced to grove one right down the middle to get a called strike, other times (especially if the pitcher is a "big name" kind of guy) throwing it into the right time zone is all it takes, especially on strike 3.


If baseball ever gets to the point where a machine calls balls/strikes. I will never watch another game.
 
2013-08-04 12:31:35 PM

FriarReb98: Look, I know it's just AA baseball on TV, but do you think the broadcasters could be bothered to pay attention and figure out WTF just happened???


I loved that. And the one guy admitted he wasn't paying attention because he was trying to find more chicken.
 
2013-08-04 12:37:31 PM
 
2013-08-04 12:37:38 PM

Waldo Pepper: Fizpez: Misconduc: Umpires can go both ways, either a batter umpire or a pitchers umpire. Most pitchers will try to dot a corner, and continue to move his ball outside until the umpire calls it a ball. First batter to whine pretty much sets his team up because that will piss off an umpire almost instantly.
Then again I've seen umpires with strike zones so small unless its over the middle of the plate with no movement its a ball, which is frustrating when you rely on movement and speed especially with hitting corners.

/quite a few MLB umpires I question their strike zone, I think deadspin once ran an article on the umpires and their strike zones, it was kind of obvious the most hated umpires are ones with the crappiest strike zones (mind the fact they are also the ones who tend to blow calls).

It boggles the mind that (although given baseball's aversion to change - not really) that we havent gone to an electronic means of calling balls and strikes.  Still plenty for the umpires to do but "figuring out what's a ball and what's a strike" on any given day should not be part of the game.  I'm reasonably sure it wouldnt even change the statistics of the game that much -  as you mentioned sometimes the pitcher is forced to grove one right down the middle to get a called strike, other times (especially if the pitcher is a "big name" kind of guy) throwing it into the right time zone is all it takes, especially on strike 3.

If baseball ever gets to the point where a machine calls balls/strikes. I will never watch another game.


If you spend hours in the summer watching meaningless baseball, you'll do it regardless of how picthes are called.
 
2013-08-04 12:54:10 PM

the biggest redneck here: Waldo Pepper: Fizpez: Misconduc: Umpires can go both ways, either a batter umpire or a pitchers umpire. Most pitchers will try to dot a corner, and continue to move his ball outside until the umpire calls it a ball. First batter to whine pretty much sets his team up because that will piss off an umpire almost instantly.
Then again I've seen umpires with strike zones so small unless its over the middle of the plate with no movement its a ball, which is frustrating when you rely on movement and speed especially with hitting corners.

/quite a few MLB umpires I question their strike zone, I think deadspin once ran an article on the umpires and their strike zones, it was kind of obvious the most hated umpires are ones with the crappiest strike zones (mind the fact they are also the ones who tend to blow calls).

It boggles the mind that (although given baseball's aversion to change - not really) that we havent gone to an electronic means of calling balls and strikes.  Still plenty for the umpires to do but "figuring out what's a ball and what's a strike" on any given day should not be part of the game.  I'm reasonably sure it wouldnt even change the statistics of the game that much -  as you mentioned sometimes the pitcher is forced to grove one right down the middle to get a called strike, other times (especially if the pitcher is a "big name" kind of guy) throwing it into the right time zone is all it takes, especially on strike 3.

If baseball ever gets to the point where a machine calls balls/strikes. I will never watch another game.

If you spend hours in the summer watching meaningless baseball, you'll do it regardless of how picthes are called.


Nope not at all.  When the game no longer becomes the game I love then it is time to cut it loose.

Would you still watch football if a machine called offsides or movement on the line?  

There are some sports were machines taking over for calls makes sense as the refs are part of the game. 
Tennis for line calls.
Hockey/Soccer for goals
Basketball for last second shots did it go in before time ran out.
Golf/Bowling any area it doesn't matter

Part of the  problem with going to replays is you take the game away from the Umps/Refs.  Overtime they will not be as strong as they are now and I feel this is becoming evident in the NFL.  The NFL ref doesn't have to get every call right just make a call that you know can be overturned if challenged.
 
2013-08-04 12:55:10 PM

the biggest redneck here: Waldo Pepper: Fizpez: Misconduc: Umpires can go both ways, either a batter umpire or a pitchers umpire. Most pitchers will try to dot a corner, and continue to move his ball outside until the umpire calls it a ball. First batter to whine pretty much sets his team up because that will piss off an umpire almost instantly.
Then again I've seen umpires with strike zones so small unless its over the middle of the plate with no movement its a ball, which is frustrating when you rely on movement and speed especially with hitting corners.

/quite a few MLB umpires I question their strike zone, I think deadspin once ran an article on the umpires and their strike zones, it was kind of obvious the most hated umpires are ones with the crappiest strike zones (mind the fact they are also the ones who tend to blow calls).

It boggles the mind that (although given baseball's aversion to change - not really) that we havent gone to an electronic means of calling balls and strikes.  Still plenty for the umpires to do but "figuring out what's a ball and what's a strike" on any given day should not be part of the game.  I'm reasonably sure it wouldnt even change the statistics of the game that much -  as you mentioned sometimes the pitcher is forced to grove one right down the middle to get a called strike, other times (especially if the pitcher is a "big name" kind of guy) throwing it into the right time zone is all it takes, especially on strike 3.

If baseball ever gets to the point where a machine calls balls/strikes. I will never watch another game.

If you spend hours in the summer watching meaningless baseball, you'll do it regardless of how picthes are called.


And you're the guy who argues nascar is a sport and should be recognized along with the WWF or WWE.
 
2013-08-04 01:00:03 PM
I see it both ways. I think the ump was right to call the second strike on him. He clearly tell hims to get back in the box and the player ignores him. And I can go either way on the third strike given his attitude. But the ump was a dick for ejecting him. That was just overkill. You made your point, let it go.
 
2013-08-04 01:02:03 PM

worlddan: I see it both ways. I think the ump was right to call the second strike on him. He clearly tell hims to get back in the box and the player ignores him. And I can go either way on the third strike given his attitude. But the ump was a dick for ejecting him. That was just overkill. You made your point, let it go.


He was out of the box for like, three seconds.  You're allowed to be out of the box for three seconds.  The ump counted the time that the batter argued while in the box against him, which is ridiculous.

Had the pitcher thrown a pitch during that time, it should count.  So there's that.  But you get three seconds out of the box if you want it.

Just another umpire being pissy and sensitive.
 
2013-08-04 01:24:10 PM
*cue "The Price is Right" loser horn*
 
2013-08-04 01:28:47 PM

Dafatone: You're allowed to be out of the box for three seconds.


By the rules you aren't.

In MLB the pitcher can just throw a pitch in this situation. In Minor Leagues, the umpire can call a strike as soon as you step out of the box except in certain situations. This was not one of them.

Popcorn Johnny: Wrong, was ejected with a strike 2 count. The at bat will continue at that count with a replacement batter.


No. He called strike three and then ejected him. See the official play-by-play at MiLB.com in the top of the 6th:

Vinnie Catricala strikes out on an automatic strike
Midland RockHounds third baseman Vinnie Catricala ejected by HP umpire Ron Teague
 
2013-08-04 02:19:25 PM

worlddan: I see it both ways. I think the ump was right to call the second strike on him. He clearly tell hims to get back in the box and the player ignores him. And I can go either way on the third strike given his attitude. But the ump was a dick for ejecting him. That was just overkill. You made your point, let it go.


I see the minors are training and the Ump hopefully got his point across to the player that he is not in charge of the flow of the game but the the Ump is and if you want to try and show up the Ump well the Ump always gets the last word.

Unless your coach is named Earl or Lou.
 
2013-08-04 02:20:28 PM
When an opposing player gets tossed at the Baysox stadium, we put Cartman on the vider board saying, "Respect my authoritah!"
 
2013-08-04 02:32:06 PM

FriarReb98: Look, I know it's just AA baseball on TV, but do you think the broadcasters could be bothered to pay attention and figure out WTF just happened???


I work with the guy who operates the scoreboard for the Carolina Mudcats.  All their A/V equipment, including the PA system and radio, operate out of the same booth.  Most days they don't even drink while they work.

/yes, I know they're single-A now
 
2013-08-04 04:39:49 PM

Waldo Pepper: Nope not at all.  When the game no longer becomes the game I love then it is time to cut it loose.

Would you still watch football if a machine called offsides or movement on the line?

There are some sports were machines taking over for calls makes sense as the refs are part of the game.
Tennis for line calls.


So, it's OK if a machine tells you that a fast moving ball is inside or outside of a visible line, but not OK if a machine tells you that a fast moving ball is inside or outside of an invisible line?  That makes sense, and totally isn't Old Man Yelling At Clouds territory.

If implemented, it would be the umpire wearing an earpiece and receiving the signal from PitchFx in real time.  Every park in MLB already has PitchFx installed, which tracks the arc of every pitch to within an inch or so.  It's actually used for giving umpires private feedback on how they're doing.

Heck, they could put the system in and not tell anyone, and the only way you'd notice is that suddenly at-bats were being decided by pitchers and batters instead of random fat guys who make up their own strike zone and miss ~10-20% of their calls.
 
2013-08-04 04:51:04 PM

Fizpez: Still plenty for the umpires to do but "figuring out what's a ball and what's a strike" on any given day should not be part of the game.  I'm reasonably sure it wouldnt even change the statistics of the game that much -  as you mentioned sometimes the pitcher is forced to grove one right down the middle to get a called strike, other times (especially if the pitcher is a "big name" kind of guy) throwing it into the right time zone is all it takes, especially on strike 3.


Umpires have a massive influence outside the rules of the game regarding when that happens.

The top two images in that article (that Fark won't link for some reason) are heat maps for all umpires in 2012-- the dark red is nearly certainly called a strike, the dark blue is nearly certainly called a ball, and the other colors are varying degrees in between.

If it's a 3-0 count, right-handed batters have a 3.73 ft2strike zone.  If it's an 0-2 count, right-handed batters have a 2.39 ft2 strike zone.  That's a huge difference-- the strike zone expands by more than 50% in a hitter's count.  The umpires intentionally or unintentionally extend plate appearances, and there's nothing in the rules about it.
 
2013-08-04 05:18:55 PM

steamingpile: Slu: Wow. That was incredibly boring.

At least it was over quickly and not a 90+ minute kickball bore-fest.


that was random
 
2013-08-04 07:30:22 PM

chimp_ninja: Waldo Pepper: Nope not at all.  When the game no longer becomes the game I love then it is time to cut it loose.

Would you still watch football if a machine called offsides or movement on the line?

There are some sports were machines taking over for calls makes sense as the refs are part of the game.
Tennis for line calls.

So, it's OK if a machine tells you that a fast moving ball is inside or outside of a visible line, but not OK if a machine tells you that a fast moving ball is inside or outside of an invisible line?  That makes sense, and totally isn't Old Man Yelling At Clouds territory.

If implemented, it would be the umpire wearing an earpiece and receiving the signal from PitchFx in real time.  Every park in MLB already has PitchFx installed, which tracks the arc of every pitch to within an inch or so.  It's actually used for giving umpires private feedback on how they're doing.

Heck, they could put the system in and not tell anyone, and the only way you'd notice is that suddenly at-bats were being decided by pitchers and batters instead of random fat guys who make up their own strike zone and miss ~10-20% of their calls.


Different type of game. it is quite possible to play tennis on the honor system I would guess the outcomes would be about the same over the course of time. 

Baseball has always had as part of the game the Umps and all the plus and minuses that come with the system. but if you wish to take away the character of the game and make it more like a video game, please enjoy I can assure you I won't be watching.
 
2013-08-04 07:40:37 PM
Red Sox fans will be glad to know Bill Buckner is alive and well, serving as the hitting coach fo the Boise Hawks of the Northwest League.

Hey, at least he's not the fielding coach!
 
2013-08-04 09:37:32 PM

Waldo Pepper: Different type of game. it is quite possible to play tennis on the honor system I would guess the outcomes would be about the same over the course of time.


Yeah.  I recall that John McEnroe was famed for his "honor system" approach to the rules.  No one has ever seen a tennis professional argue with an umpire.  I'm sure that no one would ever try to cheat at a tournament like Wimbledon, where the prizes are only £22,560,000, a mere pittance compared to tennis honor.

Waldo Pepper: Baseball has always had as part of the game the Umps and all the plus and minuses that come with the system.


Professional tennis has always had chair umpires and line judges as part of their game, until they decided to automate the calling of serves to cut down on the error rate of humans trying to find out where fast-moving balls are.  Shockingly, the sport managed to continue despite the increased fairness.
 
2013-08-04 09:54:03 PM

chimp_ninja: Waldo Pepper: Baseball has always had as part of the game the Umps and all the plus and minuses that come with the system.

Professional tennis has always had chair umpires and line judges as part of their game, until they decided to automate the calling of serves to cut down on the error rate of humans trying to find out where fast-moving balls are. Shockingly, the sport managed to continue despite the increased fairness.


Look, I'm fairly sure that if baseball was supposed to have automated strike calls, Abner Doubleday would've said so in the original rule book.
 
2013-08-04 09:54:34 PM

Waldo Pepper: Baseball has always had as part of the game the Umps and all the plus and minuses that come with the system. but if you wish to take away the character of the game and make it more like a video game, please enjoy I can assure you I won't be watching.


Baseball (and every other sport) has always done it that way because the technology to do it reliably is fairly new (2006 was when PITCFf/x was first introduced). Not because it was better. Where there was an option, the people developing the game avoided judgement. If they wanted human error then why do we have foul lines? Just have the umpire call it based on judgement.

What is one actual advantage of having an umpire call balls and strikes rather than a reliable machine?

And "history" and "tradition" are not advantages.
 
2013-08-04 10:08:15 PM

dywed88: Waldo Pepper: Baseball has always had as part of the game the Umps and all the plus and minuses that come with the system. but if you wish to take away the character of the game and make it more like a video game, please enjoy I can assure you I won't be watching.

Baseball (and every other sport) has always done it that way because the technology to do it reliably is fairly new (2006 was when PITCFf/x was first introduced). Not because it was better. Where there was an option, the people developing the game avoided judgement. If they wanted human error then why do we have foul lines? Just have the umpire call it based on judgement.

What is one actual advantage of having an umpire call balls and strikes rather than a reliable machine?

And "history" and "tradition" are not advantages.


and changing just because you can doesn't make it better.  The DH hasn't made the game any better and neither will a machine calling balls/strikes.

See it if folks like you that put likes in Wrigley.  

Next thing you guys will be calling for is every stadium to be exactly the same, there shouldn't be a hitters or pitchers park they should all be the same.
 
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