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(Daily Grindhouse)   The Top 10 Lee Marvin Films, by Dwayne Epstein, author of LEE MARVIN: POINT BLANK   (dailygrindhouse.com) divider line 51
    More: Cool, Lee Marvin, humans, movies, The Killers, John Cassavetes, Preston Sturges, Delta Force, John Frankenheimer  
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2200 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 02 Aug 2013 at 3:04 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-02 01:58:27 PM  
Clicked link looking for "Emperor of the North", leaving satisfied.
 
2013-08-02 02:11:16 PM  
I see nothing to complain about...which is rare on Fark.
 
2013-08-02 02:11:37 PM  
I've never seen a man get through a day so fast
 
2013-08-02 02:24:40 PM  
I would have thought the author would have turned in the manuscript late, but with a note from his mother excusing him.
 
2013-08-02 03:03:49 PM  
is Prime Cut on there?
 
2013-08-02 03:06:42 PM  
Came for the Simpsons reference, article delivered, leaving satisfied.
 
2013-08-02 03:08:04 PM  
For guilty pleasures sake, no Delta Force equals no list
 
2013-08-02 03:08:50 PM  
so, no Prime Cut and no The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance???

FAIL
 
2013-08-02 03:12:31 PM  
Cat ballou.
 
2013-08-02 03:12:58 PM  
With a introduction written by Epstein's Mom.
 
2013-08-02 03:13:08 PM  
A big fan
i273.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-02 03:19:31 PM  
Wheels are made for rolling, mules are made to pack 
I've never seen a sight that didn't look better looking back 

Home is made for coming from, for dreams of going to 
Which with any luck will never come true 

Do I know where hell is, hell is in hello 
Heaven is goodbye forever, its time for me to go


I was three or four when I saw this in the cinema, we had the vinyl at home and I grew up listening to this song. It still resonates with me, so much...
 
2013-08-02 03:24:32 PM  
Really needs "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence."
 
2013-08-02 03:26:08 PM  

Robert1966: Really needs "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence."


He was out acted by Stewart in that.
and Wayne.
 
2013-08-02 03:30:11 PM  
I'll buy the book if it explains the whole mini situation "you know; mini-cars, mini-skirts..."
 
2013-08-02 03:34:01 PM  
I always got the impression that Marvin could rip another man's face off, and had the temperament to do so.
 
2013-08-02 03:41:49 PM  

JohnnyApocalypse: I always got the impression that Marvin could rip another man's face off, and had the temperament to do so.


And it was only that the annoyance of dealing with cops and courts slightly outweighed the pleasure of the said face-tearing, that kept him from doing it more often.
 
2013-08-02 03:44:32 PM  
No "Liberty Valence?"
who cares if he was outacted! He still gave a great performance!
 
2013-08-02 03:45:48 PM  

skozlaw: Came for the Simpsons reference, article delivered, leaving satisfied.


At the time I assumed the Simpons had made it up. I didn't find out it was a real movie until I channel-surfed onto it years later.
 
2013-08-02 03:46:12 PM  
came for references to the author's mother; leaving satisfied.
 
2013-08-02 03:46:15 PM  
"Look. It blew off one of your balls."
Tosses it.
"Don't worry. Ya got two."
 
2013-08-02 03:49:54 PM  
List fails without Delta Force
 
2013-08-02 03:51:08 PM  

vudukungfu: Robert1966: Really needs "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence."

He was out acted by Stewart in that.
and Wayne.


Possibly, but it was a team effort - and one of the best on screen. Any scene with all three men makes you realize how transparent all the other actors are and how well Wayne, Stewart and Lee worked together.

That's one of my favorite movies. Even as a kid seeing it at the base theater I realized how different it was from all the other westerns I had seen up to then. At the end, Marvin is dead, shot from ambush by Wayne (not exactly a stand-up fight). Stewart rides that lie to the Senate and Wayne ends up dead, alone, in his unfinished house. My 10-year-old self was properly amazed.

I didn't see it again until college where it was one of the freebies on campus. At that point I was appalled at the great Woody Strode being called "boy" throughout the film. I've learned to endure that, and I still watch it whenever it hits TCM. A great film.
 
2013-08-02 04:03:29 PM  

OldManDownDRoad: That's one of my favorite movies. Even as a kid seeing it at the base theater I realized how different it was from all the other westerns I had seen up to then. At the end, Marvin is dead, shot from ambush by Wayne (not exactly a stand-up fight). Stewart rides that lie to the Senate and Wayne ends up dead, alone, in his unfinished house. My 10-year-old self was properly amazed.

I didn't see it again until college where it was one of the freebies on campus. At that point I was appalled at the great Woody Strode being called "boy" throughout the film. I've learned to endure that, and I still watch it whenever it hits TCM. A great film.


My dad made me watch it when I was a kid.
He said,"You have to watch this."
And when my dad told me to watch a movie or read a book, by god I did, and was never disappointed. ever.
Made me read The Stunt Man, and The Choir Boys, and made me watch Harvey, too.
For a guy who was a foreman in a steel mill who worked his way up to a college professor, he knew his shiat.
And as his only son, he made sure I knew some shiat, too.

I've often wondered what happened to that poor steak, though.
 
2013-08-02 04:20:31 PM  

OldManDownDRoad: vudukungfu: Robert1966: Really needs "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence."

He was out acted by Stewart in that.
and Wayne.

Possibly, but it was a team effort - and one of the best on screen. Any scene with all three men makes you realize how transparent all the other actors are and how well Wayne, Stewart and Lee worked together.

That's one of my favorite movies. Even as a kid seeing it at the base theater I realized how different it was from all the other westerns I had seen up to then. At the end, Marvin is dead, shot from ambush by Wayne (not exactly a stand-up fight). Stewart rides that lie to the Senate and Wayne ends up dead, alone, in his unfinished house. My 10-year-old self was properly amazed.

I didn't see it again until college where it was one of the freebies on campus. At that point I was appalled at the great Woody Strode being called "boy" throughout the film. I've learned to endure that, and I still watch it whenever it hits TCM. A great film.


I watched it off Netflix Streaming last night.  My wife had never seen it and I hadn't in years.  What a great film.
 
2013-08-02 04:20:32 PM  
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, is Lee Marvin's best picture.

It should be #1 on that list, as it is really the only truly great film Lee Marvin appeared in. Liberty Valance was a known murderer and thief, he was a black-hearted killer who terrorized the citizens of Shinbone for years. He was a evil man, and as Hitchcock said, "The greater the evil, the greater the film."

Now, I like Hell in the Pacific and Deathhunt, but are they truly great films? No, but I like them and find them enjoyable nonetheless. And BTW, Lee Marvin out acts Jimmy Stewart and John Wayne in that film, and he is spectacular and unmatched performance.
 
2013-08-02 04:30:04 PM  
If Point Blank is #9 on any list then you know that you are looking at one hell of a good list.
 
2013-08-02 04:37:36 PM  
And don't forget this film, where he give Marlon Brando a run for his money:


dailygrindhouse.com
 
2013-08-02 04:41:44 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: I've never seen a man get through a day so fast


One of the funniest scenes ever.
 
2013-08-02 04:47:11 PM  

Ivo Shandor: skozlaw: Came for the Simpsons reference, article delivered, leaving satisfied.

At the time I assumed the Simpons had made it up. I didn't find out it was a real movie until I channel-surfed onto it years later.


I can never understand why people give Paint Your Wagon so much shiat, it's hilarious.

The story's entertaining, the supporting cast is great, Eastwood is wooden (but even that works, Partner is a bit of doorknob), Jean Seburg looks fantastic in a corset and Marvin is Ben Rumson.

Throw in whores, mud, gold, greed, philosophy and polyandry and what's not to like?

The songs? The songs are awesome.

The best things in life are dirty...
 
2013-08-02 04:51:04 PM  

kanesays: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, is Lee Marvin's best picture.

It should be #1 on that list, as it is really the only truly great film Lee Marvin appeared in. Liberty Valance was a known murderer and thief, he was a black-hearted killer who terrorized the citizens of Shinbone for years. He was a evil man, and as Hitchcock said, "The greater the evil, the greater the film."

Now, I like Hell in the Pacific and Deathhunt, but are they truly great films? No, but I like them and find them enjoyable nonetheless. And BTW, Lee Marvin out acts Jimmy Stewart and John Wayne in that film, and he is spectacular and unmatched performance.


This post cannot be improved.  Full on 10/10.

Ok Dude....this time right between the eyes....
 
2013-08-02 04:51:39 PM  
Cat Ballou needs to be higher on that list (at the very least, higher than Paint Your Wagon)
 
2013-08-02 04:55:58 PM  

phlegmmo: MaudlinMutantMollusk: I've never seen a man get through a day so fast

One of the funniest scenes ever.


Seriously

/loved the horse leaning against the wall, too
 
2013-08-02 05:02:59 PM  
Lee Marvin's younger brother Frank was my 5th grade teacher at Garfield Elementary in Boise.


He was just as bad-ass as his older bro.
 
2013-08-02 05:19:07 PM  
DNRTFA. Hoping The Big Red One was on the list.
 
2013-08-02 05:27:28 PM  

OldManDownDRoad: And don't forget this film, where he give Marlon Brando a run for his money:


[dailygrindhouse.com image 640x480]


So much THIS.

Marvin came across as a much more believable biker than Brando who reminded me more of one of the Village People.
 
2013-08-02 05:46:39 PM  
My Dad met him once, in some airport. My dad was with his fiance, and she had just bought something that came in impossible to open packaging. My dad asked him if he had a knife he could borrow and Lee told him "I don't carry a knife anymore, not since I learned I can kill a man with my bare hands."
 
2013-08-02 06:04:38 PM  
I loved the interminably long fight between him and DeForest Kelley in 'Raintree County'.
 
2013-08-02 06:06:29 PM  
"A secret organization exists called The Sons of Lee Marvin - it includes myself, Tom Waits, John Lurie, and Richard Bose. We're initiating Nick Cave into it too. There are many honorary members too. I have a good story about it. Six months ago Tom Waits was in a bar somewhere like Sonoma County in Northern California, and the bartender said, 'You're Tom Waits, right? A guy over there wants to talk to you.' So Tom started getting a little aggressive: 'What the fark do you want to talk to me about? I don't know you.' And the guy said, 'What is this bullshiat about the Sons of Lee Marvin?' Tom said, 'Well it's a secret organization and I'm not supposed to talk about it.' The guy said, 'I don't like it.' Tom said, 'What's it to you?' The guy said, 'I'm Lee Marvin's son' - and he really was. He thought it was insulting, but it's not, it's completely out of respect for Lee Marvin.  -  Jim Jarmusch May 1992
 
2013-08-02 06:14:26 PM  

kanesays: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, is Lee Marvin's best picture.

It should be #1 on that list, as it is really the only truly great film Lee Marvin appeared in. Liberty Valance was a known murderer and thief, he was a black-hearted killer who terrorized the citizens of Shinbone for years. He was a evil man, and as Hitchcock said, "The greater the evil, the greater the film."

Now, I like Hell in the Pacific and Deathhunt, but are they truly great films? No, but I like them and find them enjoyable nonetheless. And BTW, Lee Marvin out acts Jimmy Stewart and John Wayne in that film, and he is spectacular and unmatched performance.


Valance and Hell in the Pacific both belong on that list and I'm truly disappointed that the crap that is Paint Your Wagon is there instead.
 
2013-08-02 06:39:59 PM  

Apik0r0s: My Dad met him once, in some airport. My dad was with his fiance, and she had just bought something that came in impossible to open packaging. My dad asked him if he had a knife he could borrow and Lee told him "I don't carry a knife anymore, not since I learned I can kill a man with my bare hands."


I'm so stealing that line.
 
2013-08-02 08:17:21 PM  
No prime cut?

a travesty.

I love that movie
 
2013-08-02 09:44:49 PM  
No "Duck, You Suckers!"?

/not a great film, but a really fun mess.
 
2013-08-02 10:39:25 PM  
Personally, I'd put The Professionals at number one, but it is my all time favorite Western, so I am a bit biased.
Fantastic movie.

Lee Marvin had a small role in another John Wayne movie called The Commincheros (no doubt badly misspelled that) and he was a pretty swarmy bugger in that. But, as well as he and The Duke played off each other in that movie and Liberty Valance, they were also pretty good in Donovan's Reef.

Seriously though, The Professionals is great.
 
2013-08-02 11:15:27 PM  

RickN99: OldManDownDRoad: vudukungfu: Robert1966: Really needs "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence."

He was out acted by Stewart in that.
and Wayne.

Possibly, but it was a team effort - and one of the best on screen. Any scene with all three men makes you realize how transparent all the other actors are and how well Wayne, Stewart and Lee worked together.

That's one of my favorite movies. Even as a kid seeing it at the base theater I realized how different it was from all the other westerns I had seen up to then. At the end, Marvin is dead, shot from ambush by Wayne (not exactly a stand-up fight). Stewart rides that lie to the Senate and Wayne ends up dead, alone, in his unfinished house. My 10-year-old self was properly amazed.

I didn't see it again until college where it was one of the freebies on campus. At that point I was appalled at the great Woody Strode being called "boy" throughout the film. I've learned to endure that, and I still watch it whenever it hits TCM. A great film.

I watched it off Netflix Streaming last night.  My wife had never seen it and I hadn't in years.  What a great film.


I watched it last week on Netflix for the first time. Had not seen it before (and I'm 49) , great movie!
 
2013-08-03 01:29:29 AM  
The Professionals is one of my favorite movies and it does have a great closing line

J.W. Grant (Ralph Bellamy) : You bastard.
Rico (Lee Marvin): Yes, Sir. In my case an accident of birth. But you, Sir, you're a self-made man
 
2013-08-03 03:16:43 AM  
Cat Ballou/Point Blank/Shack Out On 101 should be 3/1/2 instead of 8/9/10, and I sure hope the author's book had a better editor than this article. Just about each entry has at least one glaring stylistic or grammatical error ("Purposely filmed more like a musical than a western comedy by director Elliot Silverstein, Jane Fonda plays the title character..." [she was not filmed like a musical--dependent clauses are a particular weakness of Epstein's] "straight forward" [should be one word] "For every appropriate John Wayne swan song like THE SHOOTIST..." [how many swan songs did John Wayne have?] "Richard Brooks' best and most satisfying film" [and other redundancies and cliches]).

That's a shame because he has obviously done plenty of research and for the most part his opinions are sound. I only disagree on a few points:

"POINT BLANK is in dire need of some tension relieving humor." The unrelieved tension is the whole point of the film, and the source of its considerable humor (and "tension-relieving" should be hyphenated).

"Time has not been kind to this mid-sixties comedy which seems quaint compared to most comedies made nowadays."  Cat Ballou may seem slight compared to many of Marvin's more serious films, but it towers over most of the dreck that passes for comedy nowadays.

Although I can understand why he disqualified them from consideration for this article, I hope Epstein gave full coverage to Marvin's supporting roles in The Wild One, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence, The Big Heat, and Bad Day at Black Rock. The illustrations for this article are extremely well chosen. I expect that's true of the book as well.
 
2013-08-03 05:49:54 AM  
If anyone gets the chance they should give Donovan's Reefa look. Not a big movie but so fun to watch Marvin and Wayne in a romantic comedy together.
 
2013-08-03 10:13:19 AM  
Ditto on the Liberty Valance love

uashome.alaska.edu
I said you, Valance. You pick it up.
 
2013-08-03 02:16:03 PM  
The Caine Mutiny...small role, but Bogart & Marvin in the same movie is almost more cool than one screen can hold.
 
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