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(io9)   No human teleportation. Not yours   (io9.com) divider line 77
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5481 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Aug 2013 at 4:04 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-01 03:56:52 PM
Why didn't someone TELL me my ass was so big?!?
 
2013-08-01 04:02:01 PM
They've obviously forgot about Heisenberg compensators.
 
2013-08-01 04:08:21 PM
Or, you know, it was a made up technology with no basis in reality other than the effects were cheaper than the the Enterprise's shuttle in 1967.
 
2013-08-01 04:08:40 PM
Haven't they heard of ssh compression?

DUH!!!
 
2013-08-01 04:11:08 PM
The one on this list that I really question is cryonics.  Just yesterday I was listening about a seed archive that has a 100% germination rate with seeds chilled to -170C for 20 years, and they expect that they'll be viable indefinitely, provided that they're both frozen and restored properly.

Granted these are seeds.  But my point is that there's a lot of research going into cryonics that not only make it a likely future technology, but one that's viable for more complex living creatures.
 
2013-08-01 04:12:29 PM
Oh, science.
Always with you what can not be done.
 
2013-08-01 04:13:44 PM

unyon: The one on this list that I really question is cryonics.  Just yesterday I was listening about a seed archive that has a 100% germination rate with seeds chilled to -170C for 20 years, and they expect that they'll be viable indefinitely, provided that they're both frozen and restored properly.

Granted these are seeds.  But my point is that there's a lot of research going into cryonics that not only make it a likely future technology, but one that's viable for more complex living creatures.


When they unfreeze them will they say "WELCOME TO THE SOIL OF TOMORROW!"?
 
2013-08-01 04:15:17 PM
I'll just jaunte instead, then.
 
2013-08-01 04:18:17 PM

Mad_Radhu: I'll just jaunte instead, then.


Stay for the synethesia.
 
2013-08-01 04:20:15 PM
What about folding space instead?  Didn't Star Trek have Iconians in it which had some sort of space doorway that basically linked two locations?
 
2013-08-01 04:20:53 PM
Without destructive copying, every time you went somewhere, you'd stay home, too.
 
2013-08-01 04:21:29 PM

Gergesa: What about folding space instead?  Didn't Star Trek have Iconians in it which had some sort of space doorway that basically linked two locations?


Two universes, I believe.  At least in TOS.
 
2013-08-01 04:22:39 PM

unyon: The one on this list that I really question is cryonics.  Just yesterday I was listening about a seed archive that has a 100% germination rate with seeds chilled to -170C for 20 years, and they expect that they'll be viable indefinitely, provided that they're both frozen and restored properly.

Granted these are seeds.  But my point is that there's a lot of research going into cryonics that not only make it a likely future technology, but one that's viable for more complex living creatures.


Yes, that only requires that the DNA not be corrupted. Freezing you also requires that your neutral connections not be corrupted. DNA last MUCH MUCH longer than your neural connections after death.
 
2013-08-01 04:23:30 PM
They're going at this from the wrong angle. Disassembly and re-assembly just won't work, if the world's programmers are any indication of our limitations.
"Please wait while BodyTransfer 2.0 installs available updates..."
"Body transfer failed, would you like to roll back the changes?"
"A fatal exception has occurred in the DNA module"

Instead of computing a human file transfer, they should ignore time relative to distance and work on manipulating matter transfer outside the constraints of lightspeed.  The matter is transferred so fast, relative to human perception, that it appears near instantaneous.  Ok, Science, gogogo.
 
2013-08-01 04:23:40 PM

Galloping Galoshes: Mad_Radhu: I'll just jaunte instead, then.

Stay for the synethesia.


And the bad face tat.
 
2013-08-01 04:24:49 PM

Mad_Radhu: I'll just jaunte instead, then.


It takes longer than you think.
 
2013-08-01 04:26:02 PM
With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed?  Do like weekly full backups and daily differentials of all officers or something.
 
2013-08-01 04:26:30 PM
www.startrek.com

What came back didn't live long. Fortunately.
 
2013-08-01 04:28:53 PM
MORE impossible than previously thought? But quantum physics tells me that anything can happen at any time, for no reason.

Next up, how to violate the laws of thermodynamics with a flywheel and some gumption, and a how to for FTL travel.
 
2013-08-01 04:29:14 PM

tricycleracer: With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed?  Do like weekly full backups and daily differentials of all officers or something.


That would be very helpful during the dominion war.  I guess that universe would be swarming with Worfs, Jadzias, Julians, Kiras and Siskos.
 
2013-08-01 04:32:19 PM

tricycleracer: With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed?  Do like weekly full backups and daily differentials of all officers or something.


Actually, there were only 5 Redshirts on the Enterprise... They had a volume license on Adam, Bob, Charlie, Ed and Fritz.
 
2013-08-01 04:33:11 PM
The biggest issue is that any quantum teleportation requires the source to be destroyed before the target can be re-created. I'm cool staying on good ole earth if I don't have to be destroyed to go somewhere else.. Which wouldn't be me anyway. It would be a copy of me. fark that.. I've worked way too damn hard to have some replica enjoying my life.
 
2013-08-01 04:33:24 PM

Gergesa: What about folding space instead?  Didn't Star Trek have Iconians in it which had some sort of space doorway that basically linked two locations?


Einstein created one in the 1950s, but he was unfortunately replaced with his alternate universe twin who wasn't quite as clever, so now we don't know how to build another Pulling Way.
 
2013-08-01 04:37:58 PM

tricycleracer: With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed?  Do like weekly full backups and daily differentials of all officers or something.


They couldn't even manage to run two copies of the Doctor on Voyager at the same time.

/You'd have thought that an emergency medical hologram would be able to run multiple copies of himself to deal with, you know, an emergency? Where there might be fifty people all needing urgent medical care? In fact wasn't a whole episode based around the EMH having a breakdown because he could only treat one person and had to choose who to leave to die?
 
2013-08-01 04:38:53 PM

Galloping Galoshes: Gergesa: What about folding space instead?  Didn't Star Trek have Iconians in it which had some sort of space doorway that basically linked two locations?

Two universes, I believe.  At least in TOS.


There was an alien race in Voyager that had a space-folding transporter.   The Spacial Trajector
 
2013-08-01 04:39:12 PM
Luddites. Computers got better, therefore anything is possible given you believe hard enough.

A 3D printer, just ONE, in Low Earth Orbit and you can 3D print yourself anywhere you want.
 
2013-08-01 04:40:00 PM
Gergesa
tricycleracer: With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed? Do like weekly full backups and daily differentials of all officers or something.
That would be very helpful during the dominion war. I guess that universe would be swarming with Worfs, Jadzias, Julians, Kiras and Siskos.


Then if destructive copying would be considered effectively cloning, how many times can someone be beamed before they start getting cell mutations or loosing IQ point?
 
2013-08-01 04:43:40 PM

tricycleracer: With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed?  Do like weekly full backups and daily differentials of all officers or something.


We could pretend the dissolution of the original body being converted to energy is what powers most of the rebuild. So you could do that, but you'd have to toss a few redshirts in there every so often to keep the meter running.
 
2013-08-01 04:46:39 PM
tricycleracer:
With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed?  Do like weekly full backups and daily differentials of all officers or something.

"Not ethical", or some gay-ass Federation weenie shiat like that.  Whereas the Klingons decided it was a bad idea after trying to duplicate a whole squad of their best warriors, only to have them slaughter each other arguing over which copy had more honor.

wharble.com
 
2013-08-01 04:46:44 PM
There was a Niven short story that got around the disassemble-humans-whole problem by having an entire ship, humans and everything, turned into a giant quantum state that would travel at the speed of light until the waveform got to the receiver, at which time the waveform would collapse and the ship would reappear. Probably wouldn't work in reality, but it was an interesting tweak on the teleportation trope.
 
2013-08-01 05:07:12 PM
If  The Fly teaches us anything, this technology most be carefully researched and controlled lest one ends up not only hooking up with Gina Davis but knocking her up too.
 
2013-08-01 05:10:54 PM

Crotchrocket Slim: If  The Fly teaches us anything, this technology most be carefully researched and controlled lest one ends up not only hooking up with Gina Davis but knocking her up too.


Caught me COMPLETELY off guard.  Bravo.
 
2013-08-01 05:22:59 PM

tricycleracer: With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed?


As it turns out, people are real easy to come by, even in the future. You'd only need to crank out new ones if you were defending your civilization from extinction. Otherwise, the regular biological process works fine.

What's harder to come by is a place for all those people to be, and organizing them in a way whereby they do something useful with their lives.
 
2013-08-01 05:27:58 PM
Watch. Next week some guy in China will do it with a modified microwave oven and an old nintendo X64. Never, ladies and germs, say never. That's when humans get pissed and prove you wrong.
 
2013-08-01 05:30:59 PM

indarwinsshadow: Watch. Next week some guy in China will do it with a modified microwave oven and an old nintendo X64. Never, ladies and germs, say never. That's when humans get pissed and prove you wrong.


Of course, it's just a question of slapping random things together and dreaming, right? This is why we already live on Mars and eat space food, right you unbelievable idiot?

Some things just aren't possible no matter how many times you binge on the Star Trek box set. So sorry.
 
2013-08-01 05:48:04 PM
If you could break down a body to its genetic code and reconstruct it curing cancer would be easy.  That's why Big Pharma will never allow it to happen.
 
2013-08-01 05:53:19 PM

scottydoesntknow: unyon: The one on this list that I really question is cryonics.  Just yesterday I was listening about a seed archive that has a 100% germination rate with seeds chilled to -170C for 20 years, and they expect that they'll be viable indefinitely, provided that they're both frozen and restored properly.

Granted these are seeds.  But my point is that there's a lot of research going into cryonics that not only make it a likely future technology, but one that's viable for more complex living creatures.

When they unfreeze them will they say "WELCOME TO THE SOIL OF TOMORROW!"?


They'll sing this song:

Back from the Shadows again
Out where an In-jun's your friend
Where the veg'tables are green,
And you can pee into the stream
Yes, we're back from the Shadows again
 
2013-08-01 06:02:57 PM
Now, the trick is to transfer all that information......it would take 4.85x1015 years.

So we'll still have Comcast in the future?
 
2013-08-01 06:06:38 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Luddites. Computers got better, therefore anything is possible given you believe hard enough.

A 3D printer, just ONE, in Low Earth Orbit and you can 3D print yourself anywhere you want.


i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-08-01 06:08:56 PM
Some witty nerds in this thread.

Also, Quantum Apostrophe is here.
 
2013-08-01 06:09:16 PM
They're just figuring this out now? A friend of mine and I figured this out, in the 80s (and I've posted about it here, before).

The way we did it is to assume a computer would convert each elementary particle to energy, transmit it, and a computer on the other end would convert it back to matter. If you (very generously) assume that each particle requires a single computer cycle to process, and multiply that by the number of elementary particles in the average human body, you get a very long time. In the 80s, there hadn't been enough cycles in the history of computing to transmit a single person, and I'm pretty sure that's still true (though I think we're getting pretty close, now).
 
2013-08-01 06:13:06 PM

whosits_112: Quantum Apostrophe: Luddites. Computers got better, therefore anything is possible given you believe hard enough.

A 3D printer, just ONE, in Low Earth Orbit and you can 3D print yourself anywhere you want.

[i.chzbgr.com image 500x332]


Why don't you teleport me to Jupiter then? Oh, right, there's no such thing.

Lochsteppe: Some witty nerds in this thread.

Also, Quantum Apostrophe is here.


At least I'm not a drooling halfwit who thinks anything is possible despite mountains of evidence to the contrary.
 
2013-08-01 06:25:00 PM

Enemabag Jones: Then if destructive copying would be considered effectively cloning, how many times can someone be beamed before they start getting cell mutations or loosing IQ point?


I'd say an indefinite amount. The idea behind the teleporter is that it creates exact copies and if it caused cell mutations it wouldn't be an exact copy.
 
2013-08-01 06:35:42 PM

mccallcl: tricycleracer: With destructive copying being the basis for the Star Trek transporter, couldn't the Federation just store a digital copy of any important person and crank out a fresh one if they were killed?

As it turns out, people are real easy to come by, even in the future. You'd only need to crank out new ones if you were defending your civilization from extinction. Otherwise, the regular biological process works fine.

What's harder to come by is a place for all those people to be, and organizing them in a way whereby they do something useful with their lives.


Ok, en masse, as Starfleet protocol, sure. But what about the less morally driven, and the "rich" in terms of that universe? What prevents them from creating their own backup and cloning/reproduction processes?
 
2013-08-01 06:38:02 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: whosits_112: Quantum Apostrophe: Luddites. Computers got better, therefore anything is possible given you believe hard enough.

A 3D printer, just ONE, in Low Earth Orbit and you can 3D print yourself anywhere you want.

[i.chzbgr.com image 500x332]

Why don't you teleport me to Jupiter then? Oh, right, there's no such thing.

Lochsteppe: Some witty nerds in this thread.

Also, Quantum Apostrophe is here.

At least I'm not a drooling halfwit who thinks anything is possible despite mountains of evidence to the contrary.


Yeah, scientific consensus was never wrong about anything.. ever.
 
2013-08-01 06:43:15 PM

BraveNewCheneyWorld: Quantum Apostrophe: whosits_112: Quantum Apostrophe: Luddites. Computers got better, therefore anything is possible given you believe hard enough.

A 3D printer, just ONE, in Low Earth Orbit and you can 3D print yourself anywhere you want.

[i.chzbgr.com image 500x332]

Why don't you teleport me to Jupiter then? Oh, right, there's no such thing.

Lochsteppe: Some witty nerds in this thread.

Also, Quantum Apostrophe is here.

At least I'm not a drooling halfwit who thinks anything is possible despite mountains of evidence to the contrary.

Yeah, scientific consensus was never wrong about anything.. ever.


Then you just need to build it. What are you waiting for?

Yeah, that's the problem, isn't it? You may *believe* everyone's wrong, but if you can't build your magical machine, what do you have at the end of the day?

Faith.
 
2013-08-01 06:46:52 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: BraveNewCheneyWorld: Quantum Apostrophe: whosits_112: Quantum Apostrophe: Luddites. Computers got better, therefore anything is possible given you believe hard enough.

A 3D printer, just ONE, in Low Earth Orbit and you can 3D print yourself anywhere you want.

[i.chzbgr.com image 500x332]

Why don't you teleport me to Jupiter then? Oh, right, there's no such thing.

Lochsteppe: Some witty nerds in this thread.

Also, Quantum Apostrophe is here.

At least I'm not a drooling halfwit who thinks anything is possible despite mountains of evidence to the contrary.

Yeah, scientific consensus was never wrong about anything.. ever.

Then you just need to build it. What are you waiting for?

Yeah, that's the problem, isn't it? You may *believe* everyone's wrong, but if you can't build your magical machine, what do you have at the end of the day?

Faith.


Fortunately, real scientists don't think as you do.  If they did, we'd all be living like the Amish.
 
2013-08-01 06:51:56 PM

BraveNewCheneyWorld: Quantum Apostrophe: BraveNewCheneyWorld: Quantum Apostrophe: whosits_112: Quantum Apostrophe: Luddites. Computers got better, therefore anything is possible given you believe hard enough.

A 3D printer, just ONE, in Low Earth Orbit and you can 3D print yourself anywhere you want.

[i.chzbgr.com image 500x332]

Why don't you teleport me to Jupiter then? Oh, right, there's no such thing.

Lochsteppe: Some witty nerds in this thread.

Also, Quantum Apostrophe is here.

At least I'm not a drooling halfwit who thinks anything is possible despite mountains of evidence to the contrary.

Yeah, scientific consensus was never wrong about anything.. ever.

Then you just need to build it. What are you waiting for?

Yeah, that's the problem, isn't it? You may *believe* everyone's wrong, but if you can't build your magical machine, what do you have at the end of the day?

Faith.

Fortunately, real scientists don't think as you do.  If they did, we'd all be living like the Amish.


I don't even begin to understand what the hell that is even supposed to mean.

You think there are real scientists working on teleportation for humans right now? Real by whose definition?

There haven't been that many scientific upheavals, we're still riding on the technological impetus from WWII and we just need 1920s physics for most of what we do.

You think that because you can find one person in the past who was wrong about something, that therefore anything, anything at all, is possible?

Do you even have a clue how wrong that is?

Again, BUILD IT, then I'll go "Oh look, I was wrong".

Until then, you have naive fantasies based on fairy tales.

Not science.

According to your world view, I should believe anything at all from any source whatsoever, because at some point, somebody made a wrong prediction, right?

Right?
 
2013-08-01 06:57:21 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: BraveNewCheneyWorld: Quantum Apostrophe: whosits_112: Quantum Apostrophe: Luddites. Computers got better, therefore anything is possible given you believe hard enough.

A 3D printer, just ONE, in Low Earth Orbit and you can 3D print yourself anywhere you want.

[i.chzbgr.com image 500x332]

Why don't you teleport me to Jupiter then? Oh, right, there's no such thing.

Lochsteppe: Some witty nerds in this thread.

Also, Quantum Apostrophe is here.

At least I'm not a drooling halfwit who thinks anything is possible despite mountains of evidence to the contrary.

Yeah, scientific consensus was never wrong about anything.. ever.

Then you just need to build it. What are you waiting for?

Yeah, that's the problem, isn't it? You may *believe* everyone's wrong, but if you can't build your magical machine, what do you have at the end of the day?

Faith.


Isn't it possible that the form of science "exploration" (I know you take issue with that term) that you deride is possibly closer to art until it is manifested? As in, "we want to get to the moon" as a goal or an idea. Prior to the 1940's, there was no conceivable was of approaching that goal, and the manner in which it was done in the 60's and 70's is laughably foolhardy by current standards. However, it was done.

It was an exercise in exploring what is truly possible, and trying to reach beyond the means and capabilities of today. It is taking what we know and trying to adapt it to more obscure and complex problems to see where it breaks down. Once those weak points are identified,  perhaps a new design can augment the previous ones ultimately leading to overcoming the "impossible". Let people have their dreams. You don't have to help them chase it, but neither side gains anything by attempting to diminish others.
 
2013-08-01 07:39:36 PM
The dinosaurs figured it out. Why can't we?
 
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