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(Spiegel)   Critical care physician Dr. Parnia claims modern resuscitation science soon to be able to reanimate people up to 24 hours after their death. Dr. Frankenstein nods approvingly   (spiegel.de) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, Dr. Frankenstein, clinically dead, Stony Brook University, brainstem  
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22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
 
2013-08-01 09:39:09 AM  
The National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health would like to discuss the minor issue of cerebral hypoxia with Dr. Parnia.  The little part about your brain cells dying after 5 minutes of lack of oxygen would seem to be a major obstacle.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001435.htm

In his defence, he does seem to be referring to bringing people back from cardiac arrest after 60 minutes of resuscitation efforts.  So I suppose if there was continual CPR during that time period resuscitation would be possible.  I tend to disagree with Dr. Parnia.  While our resuscitation techniques do improve, the best prognosis for the patient continues to be when the patient is resuscitated early in the CPR process.  So you will see probably a higher percentage of resuscitation early in the CPR process instead of longer CPR processes being successful.
 
2013-08-01 09:40:06 AM  
This story was resurrected and re-posted after 24 hours!
 
2013-08-01 09:46:03 AM  

Director_Mr: he National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health would like to discuss the minor issue of cerebral hypoxia with Dr. Parnia.  The little part about your brain cells dying after 5 minutes of lack of oxygen would seem to be a major obstacle.


Yup. There's been similar said for at least the last 30 years, but you can't get around that problem. There's rare instances, generally involving low temps and drowning, but they're very rare. And one case I think involving a woman who was drunk, and frozen outside and body temps in the 60s range, but IIRC she still had a faint and very slow heartbeat despite being stiff and visibly appearing dead. I also think the alcohol had something to do with the freak reason she made it.

/wants to live forever
//mostly
 
2013-08-01 09:59:37 AM  

Director_Mr: The little part about your brain cells dying after 5 minutes of lack of oxygen would seem to be a major obstacle.


Something something Teabaggers Republicans.

Lady Indica: /wants to live forever


You too? We should hang out.
 
2013-08-01 10:02:28 AM  

Director_Mr: The National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health would like to discuss the minor issue of cerebral hypoxia with Dr. Parnia.  The little part about your brain cells dying after 5 minutes of lack of oxygen would seem to be a major obstacle.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001435.htm

In his defence, he does seem to be referring to bringing people back from cardiac arrest after 60 minutes of resuscitation efforts.  So I suppose if there was continual CPR during that time period resuscitation would be possible.  I tend to disagree with Dr. Parnia.  While our resuscitation techniques do improve, the best prognosis for the patient continues to be when the patient is resuscitated early in the CPR process.  So you will see probably a higher percentage of resuscitation early in the CPR process instead of longer CPR processes being successful.


Came here for a brief discussion on cerebral hypoxia, leaving happily.
 
2013-08-01 10:07:33 AM  

Lady Indica: Director_Mr: he National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health would like to discuss the minor issue of cerebral hypoxia with Dr. Parnia.  The little part about your brain cells dying after 5 minutes of lack of oxygen would seem to be a major obstacle.

Yup. There's been similar said for at least the last 30 years, but you can't get around that problem. There's rare instances, generally involving low temps and drowning, but they're very rare. And one case I think involving a woman who was drunk, and frozen outside and body temps in the 60s range, but IIRC she still had a faint and very slow heartbeat despite being stiff and visibly appearing dead. I also think the alcohol had something to do with the freak reason she made it.

/wants to live forever
//mostly


That is thanks to the mammalian diving reflex. Cold water drownings can be very flexible in the amount of time you have to resuscitate someone.A very common saying in emergency medicine is "youre not really dead until youre warm and dead". I was an ACLS instructor for years, and what this guy is saying sounds absolutely fantastic until you start looking at the logistics and cost. However, if you want to jam frozen peas into your loved ones crotch during a massive coronary, do it, it's not like you're going to do a whole lot more damage. Hell, anything you do to a person in cardiac standstill is better than doing nothing. What are you going to do, make them more dead?
 
2013-08-01 10:18:44 AM  
But we all know that the undetectable soul will depart after death.  So you may be alive again, but you wouldn't need to go to church since your soul was already free.  So the best strategy is to be a really great christian for a bit then get legally killed for a day. Unless Islam is the right choice, then you should pick that one.  Or maybe it is Mormonism?...maybe Judaism...perhaps Hindu?...Scientology?
 
2013-08-01 10:23:40 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: You too? We should hang out.


Read your bio, familiar with some of it. There's some new evidence on the restricted diet you may want to check out (only glanced at it couple months ago, but looked like doesn't work in humans IIRC. Mice still whooping it up). Unfortunately agree with space assessment, but won't be us going there. Will be robots, if any from this planet. Not just because of life expectancy but also serious hazards of traveling through interstellar space let alone beyond that.

/would have coffee with you
 
2013-08-01 10:27:15 AM  

Lady Indica: /would have coffee with you


I only drink organic 3D printed coffee from private space farms.
 
2013-08-01 10:30:08 AM  
Sometimes you just have to let someone go, man.

Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could ... that they didn't stop to think if they should.
 
2013-08-01 10:32:45 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Lady Indica: /would have coffee with you

I only drink organic 3D printed coffee from private space farms.


I'm in the Bay Area, some place around here probably has an organic version of it.
 
2013-08-01 10:59:53 AM  

SecretAgentWoman: Sometimes you just have to let someone go, man.

Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could ... that they didn't stop to think if they should.


This could go well in a thread on the Entertainment tab.
 
2013-08-01 11:21:09 AM  
Just watched Re-Animator last night, so this is relevant to my interests.
 
2013-08-01 11:34:53 AM  
Dr. Walter Bishop also approves but wants to give the patients LSD as well.
 
2013-08-01 12:23:21 PM  
remember, its pronounced 'frawnk-en-shteen"
 
2013-08-01 12:29:04 PM  

graeth: remember, its pronounced 'frawnk-en-shteen"


I thought it was Frahn-ken-steen
and eye-gore
 
2013-08-01 12:36:33 PM  

Director_Mr: The National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health would like to discuss the minor issue of cerebral hypoxia with Dr. Parnia.  The little part about your brain cells dying after 5 minutes of lack of oxygen would seem to be a major obstacle.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001435.htm

In his defence, he does seem to be referring to bringing people back from cardiac arrest after 60 minutes of resuscitation efforts.  So I suppose if there was continual CPR during that time period resuscitation would be possible.  I tend to disagree with Dr. Parnia.  While our resuscitation techniques do improve, the best prognosis for the patient continues to be when the patient is resuscitated early in the CPR process.  So you will see probably a higher percentage of resuscitation early in the CPR process instead of longer CPR processes being successful.


I thought there had been research that suggests that the problem isn't with brain cells dying due to lack of oxygen (at least in the span of 5 minutes or so), but rather that when oxygen IS restored, they trigger various mechanisms that destroy the cells.  If oxygen is restored in a controlled manner and those mechanisms somehow inhibited (I believe this is where the cold temps come into play), then someone can be resuscitated well after the 5-minute mark.  The limited window for resuscitation currently recognizes is more the result of the current practices for resuscitation.

/not a doctor or biologist.
//probably shouldn't even have fish.
 
2013-08-01 12:56:05 PM  
But the soul is already gone by that point!
 
2013-08-01 01:30:02 PM  
Insert (creepy re animation from fringe.jpg)http://youtu.be/ZALbgzfmWOQ

My god, Fringe was a silly show most of the time, but they sometimes they hit upon it
 
2013-08-01 01:45:33 PM  

graeth: remember, its pronounced 'frawnk-en-shteen"


"You're putting me on"
 
2013-08-01 02:25:12 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Lady Indica: /wants to live forever

You too? We should hang out.


Yeah, just be aware that LI's version of "hang out" might involve actual restraints and suspension in the air.

And whips.
 
2013-08-01 04:03:22 PM  

Director_Mr: The National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health would like to discuss the minor issue of cerebral hypoxia with Dr. Parnia.  The little part about your brain cells dying after 5 minutes of lack of oxygen would seem to be a major obstacle.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001435.htm

In his defence, he does seem to be referring to bringing people back from cardiac arrest after 60 minutes of resuscitation efforts.  So I suppose if there was continual CPR during that time period resuscitation would be possible.  I tend to disagree with Dr. Parnia.  While our resuscitation techniques do improve, the best prognosis for the patient continues to be when the patient is resuscitated early in the CPR process.  So you will see probably a higher percentage of resuscitation early in the CPR process instead of longer CPR processes being successful.


I'm pretty sure he covered that issue.
 
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