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(Glamour Magazine)   If you look thinner in the mirror, would you hate your body less? What about if you knew the mirror did that on purpose?   (glamour.com) divider line 57
    More: Unlikely, mirror images, hate  
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1302 clicks; posted to Geek » on 31 Jul 2013 at 1:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-31 05:23:09 PM
assets.nydailynews.com

www.brucellama.com
 
2013-07-31 05:24:07 PM
Well that was...

/punches browser to death
 
2013-07-31 05:46:36 PM

ForgotMyTowel: Mr_Fabulous: There are people (people like me, for example) who  1. really like tasty food, and 2. really dislike strenuous exercise. They tend to look at very fit people with exemplary diets who work out all the time and say... that's just not me. I'm not like that. So I'm going to accept myself like this. And that's fine.

And it is fine. Until you're about 44 or so.

And then it all catches up with you, and you start to look and feel really awful. And it keeps getting worse. And worse, still. Until you no longer recognize the guy in the mirror.

For people like this, there is a good answer. Don't stop eating tasty foods... just eat 20 to 30% less of it next time. And don't start making yourself uncomfortable with ball-busting exercise every day. You'll just find an excuse to stop. So do what you can do, and stick to it.

It's not an all-or-nothing proposition. You don't have to become a health freak. Do what you can do. And then, do a little more the next day. Just a little.

It won't make you suddenly look "good" in the mirror. But it will make you continue to look like "you" in the mirror.

I swear by all that's righteous, you will reach a point where that sounds like a very good thing.

This is probably some of the best "diet" advice I've seen.  I tried quite a few of the fad diets, lost weight and then rebounded when I attempted to move away from the strict, short term restrictions to the easier, longer term restrictions.  I also tried cutting out all the "bad stuff" and exercising my butt off but every time, usually a month of so in, I'd lose patience and fall back into my old patterns.  Then I decided one day that rather than try to lose 100lbs by running and dieting, I was simply going to cut back on the bad things, but not eliminate them.  At the same time, I decided to incorporate some light exercise into my routine...nothing terribly strenuous but enough to get my heart rate up for at least 20 mins.  I'm happy to say that I've been more successful taking this route than I have with any other attempt.  I started almost 6 months ago and have lost just over 40 lbs.  It's not a massive amount of weight and I still have a long way to go, but this is an incredibly easy plan for me to stay on.  I may not be shedding the pounds rapidly but I can easily keep this up the rest of my life, meaning getting back to a healthy weight should be within my reach.  YMMV of course, but it's worked wonders for me.


Yes, it's called moderation. Congratulations on losing weight, it really is one of the best feelings because you feel proud of yourself for doing it, happier about your self image and probably a hell of a lot better when you wake up every day.

/I need to head to the gym, it's 4:45 and I'm supposed to be there at 5:11
 
2013-07-31 05:50:47 PM

GoldSpider: elchupacabra: I'm thinking that 2 year thing is highly variant -- from a few months to several years. Unlocking the science behind that will be awesome.

Yeah, I know for damn sure when I lost weight (~35lbs) that I didn't tolerate a gnawing, hungry feeling for two years.  I don't think I did for two weeks.


Ah, but then we are probably talking about very different things. If you needed to lose 35 pounds you probably weren't in the "danm you are fat" category for whom the whole changed hormonal levels are really all that relevant. But for people with obesity it can be that hard.
 
2013-08-01 07:23:56 AM

meanmutton: Is this the thread where people deny the basic science that says that in the long term the vast majority of people are unable to lose and keep weight off through diet and exercise alone?

Every study ever done on the topic comes up with the same result: once you get the weight, you're not going to lose it unless you get gastric bypass or some other invasive surgery.

Don't gain the weight in the first place, eat healthfully and exercise regularly and don't bother with the scale.


We call these people weak. Losing weight is simple and not really that hard. Don't eat as many calories. I lost about 100 pounds using that one simple trick that dieticians hate.
 
2013-08-01 07:29:20 AM

Lexx: LiberalWeenie: meanmutton: Is this the thread where people deny the basic science that says that in the long term the vast majority of people are unable to lose and keep weight off through diet and exercise alone?

Every study ever done on the topic comes up with the same result: once you get the weight, you're not going to lose it unless you get gastric bypass or some other invasive surgery.

Don't gain the weight in the first place, eat healthfully and exercise regularly and don't bother with the scale.


How is that possible?

The body uses fuel for energy. If you consume less fuel than your body uses, it taps into the strategic fat reserve.

That sounds like "basic science" to me.

1 - the body adapts by lowering its base metabolic rate.  The body likes to have a caloric surplus and can't abide a deficit - goes into starvation mode, making it very difficult to diet beyond the short term, and the rebound when you start eating "normally" is severe, as your base metabolism's lower so more of your calories goes to fat storage.
2 - food is now well understood to have a similar effect on the brain as opiate drugs.  When you're in a caloric deficit, you feel like you're starving all the time, & the cravings are insane.  And, unlike drugs, it's hard to avoid being in the presence of food, making it that much harder to "stay clean".


No and no. You're flat out wrong. Starvation mode kicks in when you're eating only a few hundred calories a day for months. Ya know, actually literally starving.

Metabolism drops because you don't have to eat as much to support your body, because there isn't as much there to support. That statement is a god damn truism. It's like saying taller people are tall because they're tall.
 
2013-08-01 10:20:52 PM
The mirror would be good for certain people - i.e., people with eating/body image disorders who constantly see themselves bigger than they are, not fat farks trying to jam their gunts into daisy dukes for a trip to Walmart. I'd buy one.

/not fat
//think I am
 
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