If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Uproxx)   Now there's a robot that can take blood donations. Surely this will end well   (uproxx.com) divider line 24
    More: Scary, blood drives, robots, veins  
•       •       •

1013 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jul 2013 at 1:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-07-30 01:14:16 PM  
Run! It's acquired a taste for blood!
 
2013-07-30 01:16:35 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-07-30 01:17:04 PM  
Yeah. No.

I think I'd rather take an experienced EMT, Paramedic, Nurse, or Phelbo/Lab Tech over a machine any day.
 
2013-07-30 01:18:58 PM  
The Xbone's EULA/DRM has officially gone way too far.
 
2013-07-30 01:20:59 PM  
I have deep veins,  as a result the nurse/technician will jab me in the elbow 3 or four times(over my insistence that they just take the farking sample from my hand)  before giving up and using a butterfly IV to take a sample from my hands.  I can only imagine that a machine would end up tearing my arm off looking for a vein,  so no thank you.
 
2013-07-30 01:33:25 PM  

hardinparamedic: Yeah. No.

I think I'd rather take an experienced EMT, Paramedic, Nurse, or Phelbo/Lab Tech over a machine any day.


That's cute... I have easy veins, nobody has ever had trouble finding a vein on me, but I'm not the norm. I think many people wouldn't be adverse to a robot doing it, rather than some poor slob at the end of a long week, thinking about rent, the vet bill, the car payment, food, who's going to pick up Jimmy from Daycare next Tuesday when he or she has to go to class after work. The robot will probably get it right the first time, whereas I've known people to get 4 or 5 jabs before a vein shows up. Hell, personally, I had someone keep my arm cranked in the blood pressure cuff so long my hand started turning purple, and that was just a blood pressure cuff.
 
2013-07-30 01:39:48 PM  
Counting is about the most aggressive thing you can do to a robot, the equivalent of going up to a human being and saying blood... blood... blood... blood...
 
2013-07-30 01:40:24 PM  
I can see it working fine on the horizontal axes, but I'm wondering how they get depth information from a vertically-mounted camera. Rather important for people (as above) with deep veins.

Between being a regular blood donor and volunteering for a lot of medical studies I have been stuck more than most, and if they can get a 90% rate, that'd probably better than my experience. I'd try it.
 
2013-07-30 01:43:21 PM  
TFA: On the other hand, human phlebotamists probably won't jab the everloving sh-t out of your elbow if they malfunction (we would hope

There's a laugh, that's exactly what a malfunctioning human behind a needle does.


<csb>
While I was in the Army I took a 'Combat Lifesaver Course', basically a step up from basic Army first aid training which included IV sticking.  We practiced on dummies, then on each other.  I have good easy to find veins so I was handed off to the less steady handed folk in the class to use.

One Soldier took four attempts on one arm to get a successful stick (moving up the vein with each poke).  When he did finally get it in successfully he forgot to push down on it, so we had a great display of what bleeding directly from a vein out an IV looks like as my blood shot out over the table.

I was very, very sore and bruised after that week.
</csb>


<csb-2>
A rather cross eyed man working at a blood donation center once failed to find a vein in my arm somehow and tried the 'root around until you get it' technique.  Hurt like a mother farker.  He wanted to go to the back of my hand next.  Someone else took over and stuck my other arm first time no problem.
</csb-2>
 
2013-07-30 01:47:18 PM  

Mikey1969: . The robot will probably get it right the first time, whereas I've known people to get 4 or 5 jabs before a vein shows up. Hell, personally, I had someone keep my arm cranked in the blood pressure cuff so long my hand started turning purple, and that was just a blood pressure cuff.


It's funny how with ultrasound guidance, I only need one stick. Or your jugular veins.
 
2013-07-30 02:48:48 PM  

hardinparamedic: Yeah. No.

I think I'd rather take an experienced EMT, Paramedic, Nurse, or Phelbo/Lab Tech over a machine any day.


If the machine can map out the vein using ultrasound it may end up being more accurate.  I also suspect it's less likely to flinch or twitch while inserting the needle.
 
2013-07-30 03:04:25 PM  
www.cracked.com"

"Roll...up...your...sleeve.  You...have...20...seconds...to...comply."
 
2013-07-30 04:06:51 PM  

hardinparamedic: It's funny how with ultrasound guidance, I only need one stick. Or your jugular veins.


EMTs are damn good at it, ED nurses are good when they're good (and bad when they're bad).  CSS: A month ago the EMT got my mom first try, gave her a nice IV.  A few days later when she ended up in another ED, a combo of several nurses and a doctor stuck her about 7 times before getting the ultrasound, another 3-4 times with, and ended up giving her a line in the jugular.  She begged them to stop sticking her.  The bruises from late June/early July are almost gone now.

I'm curious to know what the protocol is for a blown vein, a vein that rolls, if the patient is in extreme pain, or if they can't find a vein in a normal area (arm, forearm, hand, wrist).  Do they dump the robot and go for human intervention?

Mikey1969: That's cute... I have easy veins, nobody has ever had trouble finding a vein on me, but I'm not the norm.


You are very, very lucky.
 
2013-07-30 04:13:17 PM  

Duck_of_Doom: I'm curious to know what the protocol is for a blown vein, a vein that rolls, if the patient is in extreme pain, or if they can't find a vein in a normal area (arm, forearm, hand, wrist).  Do they dump the robot and go for human intervention?


I'm curious about that as well. Intranasal Fentanyl/Versed and cold-pack placement to take advantage of gate-pain control theory is what we currently use for difficult IVs that have to be started ASAP. EMLA cream is awesome, but it takes around 45 minutes to take effect.

The problem is that vascular access and draw-off is a pretty damn complex procedure, despite how outwardly simple it can look. There's as much of an art to it is there is painting a masterpiece.
 
2013-07-30 04:24:12 PM  
You can get it done down at the chopping mall
 
2013-07-30 04:25:45 PM  

Duck_of_Doom: You are very, very lucky.


I know that... I've heard some horror stories over the years, and I just can't imagine how much that would suck. It's one thing to deal with the quick stab from the needle, but over and over again? No thanks. It was great the last time I was in the hospital, I actually commented the girl that came in at 4 am and drew blood because I felt almost nothing, plus she was quick. It's pretty telling when someone who doesn't have issues with veins is that grateful. I don't think phlebotomists(sp?) get enough love...
 
2013-07-30 04:29:21 PM  

maxheck: I can see it working fine on the horizontal axes, but I'm wondering how they get depth information from a vertically-mounted camera. Rather important for people (as above) with deep veins.

Between being a regular blood donor and volunteering for a lot of medical studies I have been stuck more than most, and if they can get a 90% rate, that'd probably better than my experience. I'd try it.


It takes the reflected light and judges how deep the vein is by how little light is being reflected, and how it is being reflected. This gets compared to a map of the basic human arm's vascular system so they can find a suitably sized vein. With the infrared camera, they could specifically target any vein in your arm, I bet.
 
2013-07-30 05:02:53 PM  
talkingcomicbooks.com

And so it begins.
 
2013-07-30 05:20:42 PM  
Seen in the area:
www.cbsaction.co.uk
 
2013-07-30 06:10:05 PM  
I hate needles. I hate getting stuck, especially the big vein needles. I put up with it and usually wind up giving between 3 and 5 times in a year. Fortunately, I have pretty easy veins (only had one miss for a diagnostic test years ago). I'm also fast, they can start me and I'll be done before the previous two they started. I almost always feel much more energized the next day.

Give me the almost-elderly Red Cross phlebotomist every time. Back when they used glass, the crazy cherry blonde broke the AIDS test and I had to get stuck in the other arm. A robot? How about NO.
 
2013-07-30 07:55:51 PM  

NkThrasher: TFA: On the other hand, human phlebotamists probably won't jab the everloving sh-t out of your elbow if they malfunction (we would hope

There's a laugh, that's exactly what a malfunctioning human behind a needle does.


<csb>
While I was in the Army I took a 'Combat Lifesaver Course', basically a step up from basic Army first aid training which included IV sticking.  We practiced on dummies, then on each other.  I have good easy to find veins so I was handed off to the less steady handed folk in the class to use.

One Soldier took four attempts on one arm to get a successful stick (moving up the vein with each poke).  When he did finally get it in successfully he forgot to push down on it, so we had a great display of what bleeding directly from a vein out an IV looks like as my blood shot out over the table.

I was very, very sore and bruised after that week.
</csb>


<csb-2>
A rather cross eyed man working at a blood donation center once failed to find a vein in my arm somehow and tried the 'root around until you get it' technique.  Hurt like a mother farker.  He wanted to go to the back of my hand next.  Someone else took over and stuck my other arm first time no problem.
</csb-2>


I donate blood/platelets as a matter of routine, in 2007 when I moved to my current city, I was the first-ever stick for a brand new tech at the local blood bank. I've got easy veins, don't get groggy or queasy, etc.

She missed. Twice. Tried the other arm. Missed again. Started rooting around. The supervisior said I turned green. I barfed.

Only time I never completed a donation. Ugh.
 
2013-07-30 07:56:18 PM  
The phlebotomist robot finds the best vein 83% of the time

Does it run on applied phlebotinum?
 
2013-07-30 10:52:38 PM  
spectrum.ieee.org

NEXT...PATIENT...PLEASE
 
2013-07-31 08:09:25 PM  
This is my brother's robot!  He graduated from Princeton with an engineering degree just 3 years ago and was immediately recruited to work on this project.  This robot is his baby, and it is his arm in the pictures demonstrating it.  We are crazy proud of Joe for designing and building this working prototype.  How amazing is that??
 
Displayed 24 of 24 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report