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(LA Times)   'Paging Engineer Bob...Engineer Bob to the courtesy phone'   (latimes.com) divider line 32
    More: Spiffy, Big Boy, Union Pacific, Cheyenne, courtesy, Pomona  
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6410 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Jul 2013 at 7:58 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



32 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-30 05:06:14 AM
Big Boy.  No shiat.
 
2013-07-30 08:06:49 AM
Paging Mr. Herman....  Mr. Herman....  You have a telephone call at the front desk.
 
2013-07-30 08:18:33 AM
Think the rails can handle her?
 
2013-07-30 08:20:38 AM
Fluffy
 
2013-07-30 08:24:44 AM
That thing looks like it runs on the souls of baby seals.
Can't wait to see it in action.
 
2013-07-30 08:27:10 AM
Spiffy Indeed.
 
2013-07-30 08:36:16 AM

vudukungfu: Think the rails can handle her?


Yep.

There have been rumors about this for some time and I dismissed them all. What corporation would spend millions to refurbish a beast like this? Union Pacific, apparently. It will be magnificent once completed.
 
2013-07-30 08:39:37 AM
OK, give me Hamm on five, hold the Mayo.
 
2013-07-30 08:41:33 AM

Old_Chief_Scott: vudukungfu: Think the rails can handle her?

Yep.

There have been rumors about this for some time and I dismissed them all. What corporation would spend millions to refurbish a beast like this? Union Pacific, apparently. It will be magnificent once completed.


You know who else had a big personal train?
 
2013-07-30 08:49:51 AM

way south: That thing looks like it runs on the souls of baby seals.
Can't wait to see it in action.


Whole bunch of THIS!!!!
 
2013-07-30 08:50:54 AM
More than deserving of the Cool tag.

/kudos to UP for having a Heritage Operations department
//"logged 1,031,205 miles hauling freight"
///holy crap
 
2013-07-30 08:52:25 AM
Train porn thread!.

Norfolk & Western 1218

i.imgur.com


N&W J class (to be restored)i.imgur.com
 
2013-07-30 08:53:00 AM

kendelrio: way south: That thing looks like it runs on the souls of baby seals.
Can't wait to see it in action.

Whole bunch of THIS!!!!


The seat is stuffed with eagle down
 
2013-07-30 09:01:37 AM
"Captain Oveur, please pick up the white courtesy phone..."
cdn0.hark.com
 
2013-07-30 09:13:48 AM
Great find subby!
 
2013-07-30 09:25:14 AM
Paging nekom... call for you on line 1.
 
2013-07-30 09:41:49 AM

LonMead: "Captain Oveur, please pick up the white courtesy phone..."
[cdn0.hark.com image 720x480]


No... the other one.
 
2013-07-30 09:57:01 AM
Cool. There's one of those locomotives at the St. Louis County Museum of Transportation. The thing is farkin' huge. I can only imagine what it might be like to see one thunder down the track under its own power.
 
2013-07-30 10:14:18 AM
big boy 4014?  what about the andre 3000?
 
2013-07-30 10:23:58 AM
FTA:  It has been called the last of the giant freight locomotives

These two would like a word.

www.posters57.com

www.railpictures.net
 
2013-07-30 10:24:34 AM
++Good this is happening, and ++Good Evil capitalists are doing it instead of taxpayers.
 
2013-07-30 10:32:32 AM

akula: Cool. There's one of those locomotives at the St. Louis County Museum of Transportation. The thing is farkin' huge. I can only imagine what it might be like to see one thunder down the track under its own power.


That's the Frisco 1522 and it's a baby compared to this guy.

It used to run excursion tours and was only stored at the Museum of Transport, but like most fun things the insurance got to be too much so it was officially re-retired.

It's sad, because seeing a steam locomotive under power is an awesome, awesome sight.
 
2013-07-30 10:47:13 AM

Thingster: akula: Cool. There's one of those locomotives at the St. Louis County Museum of Transportation. The thing is farkin' huge. I can only imagine what it might be like to see one thunder down the track under its own power.

That's the Frisco 1522 and it's a baby compared to this guy.

It used to run excursion tours and was only stored at the Museum of Transport, but like most fun things the insurance got to be too much so it was officially re-retired.

It's sad, because seeing a steam locomotive under power is an awesome, awesome sight.


I partially take this back.

Everything is correct, but I didn't realize they also have a Big Boy. I think this means I need to get back out there and wander around again.
 
2013-07-30 11:27:46 AM
   I saw two of UP's other steamers at Railfair in Old Town Sacramento years ago , the UP does a fine job with their steam program. I with was there to see SP 2472, a 4-6-2 Pacific restored by the Golden Gate Railroad Museum, who also restored the little steamer I operate 20 miles a day.
  There are individuals and groups around the nation that work for years restoring these old iron beasts, and who keep the old skills alive by passing the knowledge on to the next generation.
   The restoration of the Big Boy will be a huge project, and probably take years, but will be lovingly anticipated by Foamers  young and old everywhere.
 
2013-07-30 12:01:06 PM
I'll probably never see it in person, living on the wrong coast.
 
2013-07-30 12:34:10 PM
Here's a problem.

The trackage has changed from 1945. A lot of the tracks now have tigher turning radiuses than the minimum capable for the UP Big Boy.

This means that if we ran the Big Boy on these new tracks, the nose would swing out, way out, to the point where it would overlap with adjacent parallel tracks. If a train were on the adjacent tracks in a turn, the Big Boy would collide with it. This is one of the main reasons why the Union Pacific has been reluctant to restore the legendary 4-8-8-4.

That means most urbanized areas would be out of the question for Big Boy excursions. Even wyes (the big turnabout switching tracks for turning trains around) that can service the Big Boy's needs are not going to be common. In addition to that, all parallel rail traffic on the Big Boy's route would need to be shut down, in order to avoid any clearance issues on the turns, and that can be quite the painful hit to the pocketbook.

That said, the Big Boy is likely to only be serviced in the mountainous West, in Wyoming, Colorado, Montana, and the like where the tracks have not changed much from their original bedding in the 1940's.
 
2013-07-30 12:40:19 PM

NKato: Here's a problem.

The trackage has changed from 1945. A lot of the tracks now have tigher turning radiuses than the minimum capable for the UP Big Boy.


???

ALCO built these units in New York. Clearances on a lot of railroads have actually increased because of double stack trains. I don't think it will be THAT big of a problem.
 
2013-07-30 12:45:20 PM

Old_Chief_Scott: NKato: Here's a problem.

The trackage has changed from 1945. A lot of the tracks now have tigher turning radiuses than the minimum capable for the UP Big Boy.

???

ALCO built these units in New York. Clearances on a lot of railroads have actually increased because of double stack trains. I don't think it will be THAT big of a problem.


You're misunderstanding what I'm talking about. I'm talking about lateral clearance, not vertical. A lot of the trackage in the Pacific West (the coast line) in the urban areas like Seattle and Portland, have only one or two feet of clearance on either side of the tracks, which is enough for diesels and non-articulated locomotives, but it's not enough room for the Challenger or the Big Boy, which is why neither of those locomotives have ever visited the Pacific Northwest.
 
2013-07-30 01:18:37 PM

NKato: Old_Chief_Scott: NKato: Here's a problem.

The trackage has changed from 1945. A lot of the tracks now have tigher turning radiuses than the minimum capable for the UP Big Boy.

???

ALCO built these units in New York. Clearances on a lot of railroads have actually increased because of double stack trains. I don't think it will be THAT big of a problem.

You're misunderstanding what I'm talking about. I'm talking about lateral clearance, not vertical. A lot of the trackage in the Pacific West (the coast line) in the urban areas like Seattle and Portland, have only one or two feet of clearance on either side of the tracks, which is enough for diesels and non-articulated locomotives, but it's not enough room for the Challenger or the Big Boy, which is why neither of those locomotives have ever visited the Pacific Northwest.


Do you mean the Challenger that was at Railfair Sacramento 1981 and 1991?
 
2013-07-30 01:27:33 PM
Yup. Sacramento isn't as cramped as Los Angeles or Seattle though.
 
2013-07-30 09:13:53 PM
NKato: That said, the Big Boy is likely to only be serviced in the mountainous West, in Wyoming, Colorado, Montana, and the like where the tracks have not changed much from their original bedding in the 1940's.

And that's where it/they originally ran. Even back in the 40s and 50s it was too big to get too near a lot of urban areas. And frankly it wasn't needed. What is was good for were the 150+ drags through the mountains and high plateaus, much the same way the massive N&W Y6's [a&b] were necessary for the coal drags through VA & WV.

A million miles over eighteen years (1941 - 1959) is roughly 360 miles three days a week, or about 8 hours at 45 mph per working day. Those beasts needed significant downtime for servicing - not like today's diesels, or even the diesels that replaced them in the late 50s/early 60s. But they're magnificent and I hope to take a road trip to see her run when the restoration is complete.
 
2013-07-31 12:54:15 AM
 
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