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(Guardian)   French language police finally surrender to binge drinking   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 9
    More: Interesting, unit of alcohol  
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2283 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Jul 2013 at 8:58 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-30 08:31:58 AM  
Hey French speakers:

As you are readily aware of, we show respect for your language. We find it to be so grand enough that we love to take your words and use them over our own. Why can't you show us the same respect?
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-07-30 08:41:45 AM  
Would you know we're riding on the beuverie express?
Would you know we're riding on the beuverie express?
There taking my to beuverie.
All aboard, that train...
 
2013-07-30 09:05:55 AM  
Vomiting in a dumpster is just so much more refined when it's done in French.
 
2013-07-30 09:06:05 AM  
The French haven't had a word for Englishman before?
 
2013-07-30 09:13:48 AM  
They have a culture ministry. They think they can dictate and control culture by decree.
 
2013-07-30 09:19:12 AM  
wait, there are French Language Police outside of Quebec???
 
2013-07-30 09:23:28 AM  

cman: Hey French speakers:

As you are readily aware of, we show respect for your language. We find it to be so grand enough that we love to take your words and use them over our own. Why can't you show us the same respect?


You'd be surprised how many English words are used by the French. In fact, when I was in Paris, I decided to stop by a McDonald's one time to get some junk food and see if I could get a beer there as was mentioned in Pulp Fiction (turns out I couldn't). Aside from "frites" (fries) "bonjour" and "merci", all the words in my order were in English.

Furthermore, many "-ing" nouns in English are used by the French, even when a French word meaning the exact same thing already exists, such as parking ("stationnement"), lifting - as in a face lift ("redrapage"), sponsoring ("commandite"), booking ("réservation"), etc. I guess our old country cousins love that "-ing" sound. Also in common use are weekend ("fin de semaine" - although that usage is also common in Québec), spam mail or spam (pourriel), cloud - in IT parlance ("nuage"), etc.

When an authority attempts to create a new word in their own language, it's not really a question of disrespect, but rather an attempt to grow the language by using its own parameters instead of defaulting to the source language, which is sometimes seen as lazy. Occasionally, the new words stick, although oftentimes they crash and burn, as the general public prefers to use the original expression/word.

Hell, us Quebecers are notorious for using English verbs and conjugating them as if they were French ones. That's how things how in reality, no matter what some "language police" wants.

TL;DR - All languages grow and borrow words. Sometimes they use them as-is, sometimes they try to create their own version.
 
2013-07-30 09:52:14 AM  

Savage Bacon: cman: Hey French speakers:

As you are readily aware of, we show respect for your language. We find it to be so grand enough that we love to take your words and use them over our own. Why can't you show us the same respect?

You'd be surprised how many English words are used by the French. In fact, when I was in Paris, I decided to stop by a McDonald's one time to get some junk food and see if I could get a beer there as was mentioned in Pulp Fiction (turns out I couldn't). Aside from "frites" (fries) "bonjour" and "merci", all the words in my order were in English.

Furthermore, many "-ing" nouns in English are used by the French, even when a French word meaning the exact same thing already exists, such as parking ("stationnement"), lifting - as in a face lift ("redrapage"), sponsoring ("commandite"), booking ("réservation"), etc. I guess our old country cousins love that "-ing" sound. Also in common use are weekend ("fin de semaine" - although that usage is also common in Québec), spam mail or spam (pourriel), cloud - in IT parlance ("nuage"), etc.

When an authority attempts to create a new word in their own language, it's not really a question of disrespect, but rather an attempt to grow the language by using its own parameters instead of defaulting to the source language, which is sometimes seen as lazy. Occasionally, the new words stick, although oftentimes they crash and burn, as the general public prefers to use the original expression/word.

Hell, us Quebecers are notorious for using English verbs and conjugating them as if they were French ones. That's how things how in reality, no matter what some "language police" wants.

TL;DR - All languages grow and borrow words. Sometimes they use them as-is, sometimes they try to create their own version.


Italians do exactly the same thing as the French. To me that's just an annoying affectation, especially when the proper word already exists in their own language... then again I also want you off my lawn

The Japanese seem to do it too: the other day I was watching some car-related Japanese documentary on youtube. I don't speak Japanese, but I was amazed at the number of english words I could recognize, things like "engine" "restoration", etc...

And as for creating their own version: the 2nd generation Nissan Skyline has become known as the "Kenmeri" model. In reality it should be "Ken-Mary" from the names of the characters in Nissan's publicity campaign at the time the car was introduced.
 
2013-07-30 02:04:50 PM  
But will they win a Protected Designation of Origin for beuverie express?
 
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