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(Guardian)   Computer lecturer banned from revealing a secret algorithm that can turn any Lamborghini, Bentley or Porsche into Herbie. There goes the science (Not safe for work images in sidebar)   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 60
    More: Obvious, algorithms, subscribers, luxury cars, University of Birmingham, computing  
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7638 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Jul 2013 at 1:13 PM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-29 11:46:34 PM
I worked with Garcia on this paper, and since I'm living in the states we're going to release it here. The codes are...

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Information is freedom!
 
2013-07-29 11:55:42 PM

Tsar_Bomba1: I worked with Garcia on this paper, and since I'm living in the states we're going to release it here. The codes are...

1...

2...

3...

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5...


That's the same combination I have on my luggage!
 
2013-07-30 12:47:47 AM

wambu: This still works, yes?
[i.imgur.com image 850x590]



Nope actually. The whole point to the keyed algorithm is to make it difficult to steal a car without a key. Hotwiring some of these kinds of cars are nearly impossible without such a master key that this professor would of provided to the world.
 
2013-07-30 12:59:57 AM

viscountalpha: wambu: This still works, yes?
[i.imgur.com image 850x590]


Nope actually. The whole point to the keyed algorithm is to make it difficult to steal a car without a key. Hotwiring some of these kinds of cars are nearly impossible without such a master key that this professor would of provided to the world.


Bad guys already have it. Just not as many as would.
 
2013-07-30 01:45:45 AM

PapaChester: show me: I'm all for open research and freedom and all that, but couldn't the dudes just black out the code in the paper until a fix can be put in? Maybe a fix isn't even possible, I don't know. That would be one hell of a recall.

Did anyone read the article? - "had probably used a technique called "chip slicing" which involves analysing(sic) a chip under a microscope and taking it to pieces and inferring the algorithm from the arrangement of the microscopic transistors on the chip itself"

Analysis of the hardware seems to have led to the algorithm. I'm surprised there are not more car thefts.


Your (sic) doesn't make you look smart, it lets me know that you have no idea how to spell British English.
 
2013-07-30 01:53:09 AM
You know what car most car thieves steal? The easiest one to steal. The one that's unlocked and preferably with the keys in it. These cars, while they are extremely valuable, are difficult for a street thug to steal.
 
2013-07-30 04:32:36 AM

skozlaw: PapaChester: Analysis of the hardware seems to have led to the algorithm. I'm surprised there are not more car thefts.

[imgs.xkcd.com image 448x274]

Or, rather, in this case:

[image.dhgate.com image 587x436]

People worry about the dumbest things when it comes to cars and their electronics. How many car thieves have the capability to analyze the arrangement of transistors on a microchip to steal a $100,000 car and how many would bother when they could steal twenty $10,000 cars by smashing a window or checking door handles in the time it takes to do it?


Well, it does depend, you could potentially see someone creating and selling a universal key for Porsche so instead of breaking windows to riskily steal $10k cars, you buy something off the internet and then just go up to any Porsche (or whatever), click a button and the doors unlock and the engine switches on - far less risky and far more profitable.
 
2013-07-30 07:18:22 AM

viscountalpha: wambu: This still works, yes?
[i.imgur.com image 850x590]


Nope actually. The whole point to the keyed algorithm is to make it difficult to steal a car without a key. Hotwiring some of these kinds of cars are nearly impossible without such a master key that this professor would of provided to the world.


It's too bad that there is a handy port under the dash/steering column that allows you access to the UNencrypted data networks.

C&D did a story on this a while back.  How they unlock the car using your key fob without you knowing it is even simpler.
 
2013-07-30 01:34:19 PM

xria: Well, it does depend, you could potentially see someone creating and selling a universal key for Porsche


I believe Megamos Crypto protects the immobilizer, not the door locks. You'd still have actually get into the car first and even then your key would have to negotiate the lockout codes for that particular car.

Mister Peejay: How they unlock the car using your key fob without you knowing it is even simpler.


They extend the signal. But you can only repeat the type of signal the fob gives off to something like two dozen feet so the person would have to be pretty close to both you and your car to actually make it work. Probably easier to just hit you in the head and steal your key at that point since they'll need the key anyway to actually steal the car.

Mister Peejay: It's too bad that there is a handy port under the dash/steering column that allows you access to the UNencrypted data networks.


[citation needed]

The OBD-II port could be used to do a lot of Bad Things if somebody slapped a device on it without the owner knowing, but I am highly suspect of the idea that it could be used effectively to steal a car. Your bigger concern is going to be dumb shiat like OnStar that bridges a wireless network with key components of your vehicle.
 
2013-07-30 09:48:28 PM
skozlaw:
Mister Peejay: It's too bad that there is a handy port under the dash/steering column that allows you access to the UNencrypted data networks.

[citation needed]

The OBD-II port could be used to do a lot of Bad Things if somebody slapped a device on it without the owner knowing, but I am highly suspect of the idea that it could be used effectively to steal a car. Your bigger concern is going to be dumb shiat like OnStar that bridges a wireless network with key components of your vehicle.


Well, given that there is already an open project online to decode the datastream, and all scantools work by reading (and sometimes writing) signals, I have zero doubt that someone could easily make a plug-in device to spoof the signals and put a valid wake-up over the bus.

If you want "evidence of the glazzies", automakers are now finally starting to encrypt data that goes over the various buses.

As far as RF distance is concerned, all you need is someone hiding behind another car as you park, and then they unlock the door as you walk away.  A lot of the keyless cars don't even require you to hit the button to unlock the doors, they sense the fob and unlock the door automatically when you pull the handle...

You can argue against it all you want, and I agree that it all SEEMS far-fetched, but given that these supposedly unstealable cars are being stolen with ease, something is happening.  Where there's a will, there's a way...  Supposedly it's extremely common for high-end Mercedes in SEA to wind up in China.  Likewise vehicles from Germany and the Scandinavian countries end up in Russia.
 
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