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(Humans Invent)   The world's first crowdsourced, affordable supercomputer   (humansinvent.com) divider line 19
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3093 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Jul 2013 at 12:04 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-29 12:40:09 PM  
Pretty interesting. I'd like to see whether some of the applications I routinely work with will easily be built for the architecture. Although the 1GB of RAM on the board would be a major limitation.
 
2013-07-29 12:44:46 PM  
Humans Invents proves again to be a shiatty website. It is complete bollocks to just add up the clock frequencies of each core to get to the total clock frequency. And no, I like the Adapteva thing, I actually have eight boards on order.
 
2013-07-29 01:26:45 PM  

The wonderful travels of a turd: It is complete bollocks to just add up the clock frequencies of each core to get to the total clock frequency.


Holy shiat, thanks for saving me the time I would have spent reading that article. Christ, what a maroon.

For everyone else who's interested, just go to the Parallela website.
 
2013-07-29 02:58:24 PM  
The two things a supercomputer needs are lots and lots of double precision FLOPS, and lots and lots of bandwidth to feed them.

It doesn't have double precision (only single) and, as HindiDiscoMonster pointed out, insufficient linterlinks to supply the bandwidth.  If you really want a supercomputer, try buying an AMD6950 (or Nvidia 680 or 780) and writing something seriously parallel (although with ~3G of memory, other supercomputers will kick sand in your face).

Basically, single precision is only good for problems that can be solved in real time.  Doing an FFT on audio data to 32k of samples sounds pretty bad just due to accumulated rounding errors.  Trying to do real supercomputing is just a joke (but might be great for serious DSP jobs).
 
2013-07-29 03:08:34 PM  
Can it play Minecraft on high detail at a min of 60 FPS? No? Then GTFO.
 
2013-07-29 04:42:16 PM  
Well, with Eben Upton (of Raspberry Pi) apparently saying that he wishes that he'd donated to it, and more and more articles devoted to the Parallela, it looks like it's not vapourware...

Now to find software to run on it...

/Ordered 2x16-cores, was hoping that they'd reach the funding minimum for the 64x
 
2013-07-29 05:28:44 PM  

entropic_existence: Pretty interesting. I'd like to see whether some of the applications I routinely work with will easily be built for the architecture. Although the 1GB of RAM on the board would be a major limitation.


Yeah, at first i was thinking these might make a nice large integer factorization machine - needs only integer ops. But the final matrix reduction step of the qs or number field sieve requires a lot of memory. So maybe a pile of these doing the sieving, and 1 traditional server board parceling out the sieve tasks and combining the results to do the matrix reduction.
 
2013-07-29 05:41:53 PM  
If you don't understand parallel computing, don't farking write an article about it!

This is the worst technical journalism I've ever seen, and I had a subscription to Wired.
 
2013-07-29 05:45:53 PM  

HindiDiscoMonster: yet_another_wumpus: The two things a supercomputer needs are lots and lots of double precision FLOPS, and lots and lots of bandwidth to feed them.

It doesn't have double precision (only single) and, as HindiDiscoMonster pointed out, insufficient linterlinks to supply the bandwidth.  If you really want a supercomputer, try buying an AMD6950 (or Nvidia 680 or 780) and writing something seriously parallel (although with ~3G of memory, other supercomputers will kick sand in your face).

Basically, single precision is only good for problems that can be solved in real time.  Doing an FFT on audio data to 32k of samples sounds pretty bad just due to accumulated rounding errors.  Trying to do real supercomputing is just a joke (but might be great for serious DSP jobs).

my dream is a collection of 12xTegra servers using the K20x chip and interlinked via InfiniBand... and if I ever win the lottery, I will build my very own supercomputer from it.

Dual Xeon G8 Quad Core systems with 128GB RAM/CPU @ PC12800 running with 12 K20X Tegra GPU Cards... they are I belive 6U systems, so figure 6 systems per rack, and lets say 10 racks. That would be 60 systems total using a fiber mapped InfiniBand interlink system @ 12X...

/aaaaah fantasies...
//good way to blow the lottery winnings.


What would you use it for, just out of curiosity? For me, I would like to be the person to completely factor F12. But that is pretty fringe ultranerdy, even among a crowd of ubernerds. Curious what other people want with these systems.
 
2013-07-29 07:37:47 PM  

HindiDiscoMonster: yet_another_wumpus: The two things a supercomputer needs are lots and lots of double precision FLOPS, and lots and lots of bandwidth to feed them.

It doesn't have double precision (only single) and, as HindiDiscoMonster pointed out, insufficient linterlinks to supply the bandwidth.  If you really want a supercomputer, try buying an AMD6950 (or Nvidia 680 or 780) and writing something seriously parallel (although with ~3G of memory, other supercomputers will kick sand in your face).

Basically, single precision is only good for problems that can be solved in real time.  Doing an FFT on audio data to 32k of samples sounds pretty bad just due to accumulated rounding errors.  Trying to do real supercomputing is just a joke (but might be great for serious DSP jobs).

my dream is a collection of 12xTegra servers using the K20x chip and interlinked via InfiniBand... and if I ever win the lottery, I will build my very own supercomputer from it.

Dual Xeon G8 Quad Core systems with 128GB RAM/CPU @ PC12800 running with 12 K20X Tegra GPU Cards... they are I belive 6U systems, so figure 6 systems per rack, and lets say 10 racks. That would be 60 systems total using a fiber mapped InfiniBand interlink system @ 12X...

/aaaaah fantasies...
//good way to blow the lottery winnings.


I'm pretty sure that there was a Dilbert sequence back in the 1990s (when it was largely a nerd chronicle) when Dilbert won the lottery (how, with his obvious understanding of the underlying math, is long since forgotten).  Dogbert explained the "law of found money" and told him to blow it on something he wanted before he blew it on things he didn't.  The last strip in that sequence ends with him talking to a Cray salesman (really dates the strip now that I think about it).
 
2013-07-29 07:50:09 PM  
Allow me to crowd-source this thing to far superior device.
First someone needs to invent something like Infiniband, but with direct male/female connectivity and that passes power as well.
Put one of these connectors on each of two sides of the device plus above and below, so they can connect vertically or horizontally.

Then come up with multiple variations of the board (Unless stated otherwise all boards have one processor and 1GB of RAM)....

1.) Default... Stand-alone board that works essentially like the Parallella already works, but with the new power/data system. Acts as primary I/O device.
2.) Display... Adds dedicated HD graphics and graphics RAM + mini-display port (may not have the standard processor + RAM, depending on size needed to do this).
3.) Power... Takes two power inputs that pass on to other boards.
4.) SATA..... Connects to, and powers, two HDD's.
5.) Processor..... Has two processors and 2GB RAM instead of one.
6.) Memory..... Adds 4GB of RAM instead of just 1GB.
7.) Battery..... Adds a battery that will run the system for a short period if power is temporarily lost. This is the only board with no processor on it, it only stores and passes power, and does not pass data like the other boards. So it has to go at the start/end of a line of devices. Works well as the bottom of each column with power directly above it.

So basically fully modular computing where each piece adds exactly what the user needs, while also directly increasing the overall power of the device. Frames could be sold that hold X number of modules, to include portable ones that include a monitor, forming an oversized laptop... They would have a few extra power/data connections that could be used with cables to add more devices on the go if needed.
 
2013-07-29 08:57:06 PM  
If I can make a decent emulator/media box out of this... it might be interesting.

/Raspberry Pi is cool, but has some limitations towards that task
 
2013-07-29 09:54:37 PM  
Someone with javascript paste the article here. It's text, so it obviously needs javascript to display.
 
2013-07-30 02:49:23 AM  

DigitalCoffee: Can it play Minecraft on high detail at a min of 60 FPS? No? Then GTFO.


Oh, come on. It can't solve the Mideast situation, either. Impossible standards are unhelpful.
 
2013-07-30 08:11:21 AM  
I have no clue to what any of what was just said, but I'd like to ask you guys here:

Will a bunch of these make-do for a top level GPU? For (1) Games, and (2) batch processing times in Photoshop CS6.

Thanks in advance!
 
2013-07-30 12:04:26 PM  

uttertosh: I have no clue to what any of what was just said, but I'd like to ask you guys here:

Will a bunch of these make-do for a top level GPU? For (1) Games, and (2) batch processing times in Photoshop CS6.

Thanks in advance!


No. This processor has a generic instruction set geared toward general problem solving. A GPU has an instruction set geared specifically for certain math, and operations involved in graphics processing. Such as single instructions for base 2 logs, vector dot products, texture table lookups, etc. Which means the underlying algorithm is implemented in dedicated hardware (mucho faster). The memory bus (path between processor and memory) on a video board is wide and fast also, which is very important. Not so sure about memory bus this thing, didn't research it to that detail.
 
2013-07-30 12:21:23 PM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: uttertosh: I have no clue to what any of what was just said, but I'd like to ask you guys here:

Will a bunch of these make-do for a top level GPU? For (1) Games, and (2) batch processing times in Photoshop CS6.

Thanks in advance!

No. This processor has a generic instruction set geared toward general problem solving. A GPU has an instruction set geared specifically for certain math, and operations involved in graphics processing. Such as single instructions for base 2 logs, vector dot products, texture table lookups, etc. Which means the underlying algorithm is implemented in dedicated hardware (mucho faster). The memory bus (path between processor and memory) on a video board is wide and fast also, which is very important. Not so sure about memory bus this thing, didn't research it to that detail.


Glad I refreshed the thread before I commented. You said it way better than I was gonna.
 
2013-07-30 12:26:59 PM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: No

+ [stuff]

Thx! :-))
 
2013-07-30 12:31:39 PM  
Oh, and FWIW, I love fark because I can be smart, funnay and ignorant, all with the one login/password!!

Socialism works!
 
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