Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CNN)   Has technology ruined handwriting? Wait, you mean it wasn't ruined before?   ( cnn.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely, University of North Dakota  
•       •       •

1088 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Jul 2013 at 12:08 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-07-28 10:05:28 AM  
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-28 10:20:30 AM  
It has made me a horrible speller.
 
2013-07-28 10:57:43 AM  
My handwriting sucked before I ever touched a keyboard. Technology has allowed me to achieve check-worthy scribbling anywhere, anytime.
 
2013-07-28 11:53:21 AM  
It can't be technology. Griffonage has a long tradition.

www.heraldry.ca
 
2013-07-28 12:11:12 PM  
I find that if I have to write more than a paragraph manually, I get writers cramp VERY fast. Those muscles are out of practice!

Also, while I was proud of my penmanship back in school, nowadays it's horrible. I don't even bother to form letters in my signature past the first initials.

I can type like a motherfarker, though. Fast, stream-of-consciousness, without looking at the keyboard, it's like an extension of my brain.
 
2013-07-28 12:26:44 PM  

SecretAgentWoman: I find that if I have to write more than a paragraph manually, I get writers cramp VERY fast. Those muscles are out of practice!


I noticed that just the other day, too.  Great, one more thing I can't do for more than five minutes.
 
2013-07-28 12:32:16 PM  
I believe Gutenberg ruined handwriting with technology over 500 years ago, subby.
 
2013-07-28 12:36:20 PM  

opiumpoopy: I believe Gutenberg ruined handwriting with technology over 500 years ago, subby.


It was ruined again by Mitterhofer 150 years ago.
 
2013-07-28 12:36:49 PM  
Until I can type and "arrange" my notes at the same speed as I can handwritten and doodle/draw/design over the page, I'll stick with penmanship.

/choose the right tool for the right job
 
2013-07-28 12:39:48 PM  
A co-worker used to insist on taping feathers, fake flowers, etc. to the tops of pens in our office to prevent visitors from stealing them. A month ago, I told her, "Ya know, you probably shouldn't bother with that. It's not like people handwrite anything anymore. Why would anybody want to steal a pen these days?"

Result: no more "pen adornment," but we do leave out just the cheap stick pens now. Nobody steals them.
 
2013-07-28 12:56:08 PM  
It has ruined handwriting, spelling, and grammar.  I bookmarked urbandictionary.com just so I could decode what my children are trying to say to me...
 
2013-07-28 12:59:13 PM  
Yeah, I've never been able to write legibly either. Technology just means I don't have to.
 
2013-07-28 12:59:40 PM  
Fark it. People will adapt. They only teach handwriting from a right handers perspective anyway. Growing up as a lefty i was forced to adapt to the what the right handers thought was acceotable. Chit, the schools did morw to accomodate the little spanish kid that didnt speak english than they did me for being left handed.
 
2013-07-28 01:03:09 PM  
Electricity ruined the gas lamp industry.
 
2013-07-28 01:16:56 PM  
Video killed the radio star
 
2013-07-28 01:17:26 PM  
FTFA: Carlson says cursive writing combines mental and physical processes which involve both sides of the brain. ... "If you are typing or texting, it's a matter of punching and finger-moving," she says. "You are doing very little thinking because you are not allowing your brain to form neural processes."

Even if you wrote this out in longhand it still wouldn't make any sense and is strong evidence of lack of thinking.
 
2013-07-28 01:35:29 PM  

DarwiOdrade: opiumpoopy: I believe Gutenberg ruined handwriting with technology over 500 years ago, subby.

It was ruined again by Mitterhofer 150 years ago.


Actually, it was ruined by a man named Og 40,000 years ago when he invented the drawing on the rocks in soot with your fingers technique over the much superior drawing in the dirt with a stick technique.
 
2013-07-28 02:24:49 PM  

HairBolus: FTFA: Carlson says cursive writing combines mental and physical processes which involve both sides of the brain. ... "If you are typing or texting, it's a matter of punching and finger-moving," she says. "You are doing very little thinking because you are not allowing your brain to form neural processes."

Even if you wrote this out in longhand it still wouldn't make any sense and is strong evidence of lack of thinking.


This, unfortunately.

I'm a huge proponent of penmanship as not just an art, but as a necessary utility, but that quote didn't do me any favors in trying to explain why penmanship is so important.
 
2013-07-28 03:44:36 PM  
Co-worker's kid is learning cursive. She referred to it as a new font, which I thought was pretty accurate.
 
2013-07-28 04:09:01 PM  

NotARocketScientist: Co-worker's kid is learning cursive. She referred to it as a new font, which I thought was pretty accurate.


The kid or your co-worker?
 
2013-07-28 04:16:16 PM  

WordyGrrl: A co-worker used to insist on taping feathers, fake flowers, etc. to the tops of pens in our office to prevent visitors from stealing them. A month ago, I told her, "Ya know, you probably shouldn't bother with that. It's not like people handwrite anything anymore. Why would anybody want to steal a pen these days?"

Result: no more "pen adornment," but we do leave out just the cheap stick pens now. Nobody steals them.


I don't steal pens per-se. Usually I "adopt" lonely pens I find on empty desks in computer labs or on the floors in the hallways of my school. I have about 50 pens in my most used purse at any given time. As a writer with no smartphone, I dread the time I need to write something down and have no pen, so whenever I come across one, my brain automatically compels me to keep it.
 
2013-07-28 04:42:13 PM  
hand writing?
I write a couple of checks a year.
I make notes on paper for projects for work.
I organize those notes into OneNote when I have a few mins to decide how I want to organize the info.
And then toss the paper out.

/so close to a paperless office and yet so far
 
2013-07-28 04:49:21 PM  

WordyGrrl: A co-worker used to insist on taping feathers, fake flowers, etc. to the tops of pens in our office to prevent visitors from stealing them. A month ago, I told her, "Ya know, you probably shouldn't bother with that. It's not like people handwrite anything anymore. Why would anybody want to steal a pen these days?"

Result: no more "pen adornment," but we do leave out just the cheap stick pens now. Nobody steals them.




If your company info is on the pen, I'm taking it.

/never have enough pens
//fark pencils
 
2013-07-28 04:49:30 PM  

SecretAgentWoman: I find that if I have to write more than a paragraph manually, I get writers cramp VERY fast. Those muscles are out of practice!

Also, while I was proud of my penmanship back in school, nowadays it's horrible. I don't even bother to form letters in my signature past the first initials.

I can type like a motherfarker, though. Fast, stream-of-consciousness, without looking at the keyboard, it's like an extension of my brain.


This, this and this.  When I was in Grade 2, the teacher had a big poster on the wall with different sections for different quality handwriting (Try Trail, Better Bridge, Careful Writing Castle, etc).  Getting into the Careful Writing Castle was probably my proudest moment that year,

Nowadays, I don't write, I print, and it looks like chicken scratch.  On bad days, drunken epileptic chickenscratch.

I can't even read my cursive handwriting from elementary school.  The joined-up letters don't even look like letters, just a continuous wiggle.
 
2013-07-28 04:51:41 PM  

akuma976: Fark it. People will adapt. They only teach handwriting from a right handers perspective anyway. Growing up as a lefty i was forced to adapt to the what the right handers thought was acceotable. Chit, the schools did morw to accomodate the little spanish kid that didnt speak english than they did me for being left handed.




Devil-handed freaks!

i.imgur.com

Was going to go with erasermate pen.
 
2013-07-28 04:55:28 PM  
Does anyone else "sign" stuff in a fraction of a second?
 
2013-07-28 05:02:09 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: WordyGrrl: A co-worker used to insist on taping feathers, fake flowers, etc. to the tops of pens in our office to prevent visitors from stealing them. A month ago, I told her, "Ya know, you probably shouldn't bother with that. It's not like people handwrite anything anymore. Why would anybody want to steal a pen these days?"

Result: no more "pen adornment," but we do leave out just the cheap stick pens now. Nobody steals them.

If your company info is on the pen, I'm taking it.

/never have enough pens
//fark pencils


I have a only a handful of really good pens I've picked up at various SWAG events. Most companies put out such cheap, crappy pens that I'd be reluctant to use their services. So sad.
 
2013-07-28 05:43:00 PM  

namatad: hand writing?
I write a couple of checks a year.
I make notes on paper for projects for work.
I organize those notes into OneNote when I have a few mins to decide how I want to organize the info.
And then toss the paper out.

/so close to a paperless office and yet so far


I once delivered my handwritten notes from a meeting to the marketing VP.

He thanked the IT secretary for taking the time. Wasn't sure if I should be proud or insulted.

/handwriting is fun
 
2013-07-28 05:55:39 PM  
Nope. My handwriting is no less illegible than it ever was.

Technology has quite ironically given voice to people who are proudly incapable of writing well, though.

/incapable but not proud of it
 
2013-07-28 06:14:28 PM  
No, that was my fifth grade teacher that told me my handwriting was so bad I should never write in cursive again. 30 years later, still have a hard time reading anything in cursive and only print.  the only thing I can write in "cursive" is my signature and really, you can make out just the first letter in each string.  May as well sign it with just an X.
 
2013-07-28 06:43:17 PM  
Good, cursive is archaic anyway and unless a person is really skilled at it, it's damn near impossible to read.
 
2013-07-28 06:45:51 PM  

LrdPhoenix: DarwiOdrade: opiumpoopy: I believe Gutenberg ruined handwriting with technology over 500 years ago, subby.

It was ruined again by Mitterhofer 150 years ago.

Actually, it was ruined by a man named Og 40,000 years ago when he invented the drawing on the rocks in soot with your fingers technique over the much superior drawing in the dirt with a stick technique.


OG DEVELOP FREE MARKET SOLUTION
 
2013-07-28 06:55:04 PM  
I get writers cramp if I need to write more than my signature.
 
2013-07-28 07:25:43 PM  
Just ask our tresury secretary, Mister Ooooooooo.
 
2013-07-28 08:52:56 PM  
I still have very legible, albeit flourish-y, handwriting, but I can't write more than a paragraph or
two before my hand cramps up.

My sons were never taught cursive, which is ridiculous. My oldest son doesn't have a 'signature',
as it is the same as block printing his name.

I'm at the point where I'm about to write my oldest son's name in cursive and say "Here, copy
this until you can write it without thinking about it and then tweak it to make it your own".
 
2013-07-28 09:55:36 PM  
I got tired of "chicken tracks" when I was a teenager and taught myself to write better. I still write very clearly and legibly when I take my time and have a decent pen.

But I would really love to be able to write a really fine XVIIIth century script. My handwriting is more XIXth century. I've seen plenty of good and bad handwriting in my genealogical research. The best hand-writing used to be better than today's writing, but the worst used to be worse. Even among the wealthy and high born, signatures were once very shaky, especially in old age.

But some of the census-takers and priests had beautiful handwriting and I assume that even in poor rural communities, many of the school-teachers did this job, or post-masters (mistresses). It was often a small bit of government patronage.

All in all there probably hasn't been as much decline in handwriting as people think. It's a skill that ought to be kept up for when the power goes out and perhaps just for the art of it. When things become obsolete, they become luxury items, like horse-back riding, carriage-driving, and cooking.
 
2013-07-29 01:17:08 AM  

darwinpolice: SecretAgentWoman: I find that if I have to write more than a paragraph manually, I get writers cramp VERY fast. Those muscles are out of practice!

I noticed that just the other day, too.  Great, one more thing I can't do for more than five minutes.


Try a better pen. Fountain pens and rollerballs (and even gel pens) take much less pressure, so you don't have to grip them nearly as hard, thus less strain on your hand.


As for handwriting getting worse, do I need to post a sample of Sigmund Freud's? There is a very long history of crappy handwriting.
 
2013-07-29 03:46:07 AM  

Mawson of the Antarctic: Until I can type and "arrange" my notes at the same speed as I can handwritten and doodle/draw/design over the page, I'll stick with penmanship.

/choose the right tool for the right job


So you're basically admitting your education is obsolete?  Most people who graduated high school in the last two decades and everyone that's graduated college in the last decade can do that.
 
2013-07-29 10:14:45 AM  

Jim_Callahan: Mawson of the Antarctic: Until I can type and "arrange" my notes at the same speed as I can handwritten and doodle/draw/design over the page, I'll stick with penmanship.

/choose the right tool for the right job

So you're basically admitting your education is obsolete?  Most people who graduated high school in the last two decades and everyone that's graduated college in the last decade can do that.


My brain processes things at different speeds depending on the tool I'm using, typing on a computer vs typing on a typewriter has a different speed which is entirely different than writing in longhand. Suprisingly, I've found texting on a capacitive screen a good half-step between typing and handwriting for processing words. (Computer Typing can be too fast sometimes)
 
2013-07-29 02:31:46 PM  

toetag: No, that was my fifth grade teacher that told me my handwriting was so bad I should never write in cursive again. 30 years later, still have a hard time reading anything in cursive and only print.  the only thing I can write in "cursive" is my signature and really, you can make out just the first letter in each string.  May as well sign it with just an X.


I was pretty much told the same thing, but I found I enjoyed using a dip pen so I got into calligraphy.  My regular handwriting is still crappy, but slowing down to practice different fonts makes an insane difference.

Current favorite pen:
www.stylo.ca
 
Displayed 40 of 40 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report