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(AZCentral)   As long as there are old people, the phone landline will never go obsolete. "We are not really computer savvy"   (azcentral.com) divider line 165
    More: Obvious, land lines, Voice over Internet Protocol, IBISWorld, cordless phone  
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4294 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jul 2013 at 9:50 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-28 11:16:41 AM  

Rhino_man: ItachiNai: Damn... Ninja'd.  Good one Rhino_man.  I bow to thee.  :D

[ecx.images-amazon.com image 349x475]


Upon closer inspection... looks like 68 seconds.

I don't think that was ever a movie.
 
2013-07-28 11:17:09 AM  

fjnorton: Lesson learned from all the hurricanes is always have a land line. They are buried here and the only thing that has continued working through all of the hurricanes.
We had to evacuate and would call the answering machine to see if the house was still there.


For a few days after Hurricane Andrew demolished Dade County, just about the only people who were able to communicate coherently and reliably were the HAM radio operators.  Communication systems and devices have changed, but I have a scanner from Radio Shack that includes HAM freqs, and still keep it handy when there's a storm kicking up in the Gulf.
 
2013-07-28 11:23:54 AM  

here to help: Waldo Pepper: but it is sad to see you equate overpriced cell phones and service with importance.

My point was it is unlikely you are important enough to anyone in society that it is absolutely imperative you can be reached at all times. The vast majority of calls made on celphones is inane jibber jabber that could wait until you get home or to your office. It's a waste of time, money and brainpower.

But you knew that's what I meant, didn't you?


Cellphones aren't anything to do with how "important" you are, and haven't been since the day of Yuppies. Now it's "wife has gone to the store and I've just noticed we're out of mayo but iI can call her" or "I'm stuck in traffic and going to be late so I should call", common everyday occurances where having a cellphone has made a huge ddifference to everyday life.
 
2013-07-28 11:23:57 AM  
I am under the impression that I have to have a landline for directv and Internet.

I'd appreciate some education on the subject.

TIA
 
2013-07-28 11:28:08 AM  
I just hate cellphones.
 
2013-07-28 11:29:03 AM  

cchris_39: I am under the impression that I have to have a landline for directv and Internet.

I'd appreciate some education on the subject.

TIA


They want you to, but you can disconnect it.  Mine has been unplugged for years.
 
2013-07-28 11:29:10 AM  
I do have a smart phone, but i also have a landline. Not only that, my phones are old rotary phones. I like the sound quality and their heft. Cell phone truly suck as phones. And trying to have a conversation on Skype or FaceTime is a joke.
 
2013-07-28 11:31:24 AM  
Dumped the landline after I started realising that I was never home to answer it.  But VOIP can be a very good substitute in certain scenarios.

Recently moved to another city a few hours away, but wanted to keep my old mobile number.  The mobile phone has a very reasonable nationwide unlimited plan, so it wouldn't cost me any extra despite the fact that everything in the new city is long distance from the old number.  The complication was that people in the new city would have to dial long distance to reach me, and I wanted to save them that cost.  I got a Voip.ms number in the new area code for a mere 25 bucks (plus $30 one-time cost for an ATA adapter), and have it forwarded to the mobile phone permanently.  The voip service is cheap and has a lots of features; I can very easily blacklist telemarketers/nuisance callers and even customise what kind of response they get (ie. specific recorded message, busy signal, no service signal, etc).

Combined with appropriate handsets inside the home (ie. something that allows your cell phone to hand off incoming calls to the house handsets via bluetooth), it's a good all-around solution for avoiding LD charges between the two area codes, and funnelling all calls to a single number + voicemail.
 
2013-07-28 11:34:47 AM  

Rhino_man: Funny thing about old people, they tend to do this thing called... oh, what was it called?

Oh yeah, DYING.

When the boomers are dead, so is the landline.  Book it.


You make the mistake of assuming that every telephone is associated with a person.  Most telephones are associated with places.
 
2013-07-28 11:34:58 AM  

fjnorton: Lesson learned from all the hurricanes is always have a land line. They are buried here and the only thing that has continued working through all of the hurricanes.
We had to evacuate and would call the answering machine to see if the house was still there.


I had an image of your Princess phone floating on a cushion, held close to your submerged home by the wire. And ringing.
 
2013-07-28 11:35:05 AM  

cchris_39: I am under the impression that I have to have a landline for directv and Internet.

I'd appreciate some education on the subject.

TIA


Comcast/Xfinity provides my cable TV and Net service via a cable to the house.  My understanding is that the cable transmits signals sort of like a fast fax line.  I have a router and modem to sort it all out.  I use a different cell phone provider.  For practical reasons, I'd not want to bundle that with them, as well.

Although Verizon and Comcast have apparently partnered in that very thing.
 
2013-07-28 11:35:16 AM  
still have a landline and like it because the GPS is deactivated. (lame joke)
 
2013-07-28 11:36:16 AM  
a) I'm old.
b) We discontinued our landlines in 2006
c) Cell quality has been improving every year since I first had a cell phone and is now about equal to landlines - at least equal to voip. (Which is good because my hearing is degrading at an alarming rate).

In 2006, giving my out-of-state cell phone area code to my dentist and telling them that it was the only number that I had caused some confusion. Today, it's very common and goes without comment.
 
2013-07-28 11:37:36 AM  
It's pathetic that there are still people who have to worry about things like long distance charges.

Then again, it's also pathetic that there are still massive dead zones in populated areas that force people into using land lines just to communicate in the first place.  As long as the telcos refuse to expand their cellular and internet infrastructure (you know, like they promised the FCC they would do well over a decade ago), people living in those zones, regardless of their technical prowess, will still be forced to use archaic technology.

My dad has DSL through the only company that offers any kind of broadband in the area.  He's paying for 5MB down, and gets 1.5.  If he's lucky.  The ISP says that's just how it goes, so he's SOL for any kind of modern day communication unless he's willing to deal with constant lag and dropouts on even simple voice chats (the line also has random latency spikes the ISP refuses to investigate.)  YAY for deregulation!!  >:(
 
DVD
2013-07-28 11:40:04 AM  
Alright, I'll give you that, but 'allowed to' is a big thing.  There was another up the thread that basically echoed a thought that some folks have that 'you aren't important enough to...' have emergency services?  Have civilization available beyond the willingness of the 1% in charge to allow it?  The telcos in charge may not want to provide the service, but I'm pretty sure they don't want to allow any competition to step in and make it work either.  Just look at Google Fiber's stories and the fight given to muni-broadband even when the telcos had no plans to provide a similar service.

The ' allowed to ' part becomes addressed more when we elect enough of the government to respond to growing conditions of 'have not' like what the South was before the 30s.   The corporate 1% at the time didn't want to provide services to much of that region, but (and I'd have to read more myself, but it fits typical behavior), I'd bet that the lack of development there was also due to their hamstringing of anyone that was willing to try.


Rhino_man: DVD: You just saw everything above your post and it just flew by without any comprehension as to why your statement doesn't work?

Rhino_man:
Funny thing about old people, they tend to do this thing called... oh, what was it called?

Oh yeah, DYING.

When the boomers are dead, so is the landline.  Book it.

Allow me to elaborate.  Currently, phone utility companies are required to offer landline service to everywhere you can have mail delivered.  The phone companies hate this fact, because there are MASSIVE areas of this nation where it is quite unprofitable to continue this practice.

When the old people die off - and believe me, they will - the political will to save the landline will die with them.  The phone companies will then have their lobbyists write a repeal of that law.  As soon as they're allowed to, they'll cut the option to continue service for everyone farther than 20 miles from a city.  Strange how the Venn diagram of "people who will lose landline service" and "people who live in places that cell phones don't work" looks like one farking circle.

So no, I didn't let the whole thread fly by without any comprehension.  I just didn't bother explaining every step in the process.

 
2013-07-28 11:42:33 AM  
I still maintain a land line for a couple reasons.
1) Adding a static IP onto the Cable company bill would cost more than getting POTS land line, unlimited US-48 long distance, 10Mbps DSL, and a static IP from the local telco.
2) The local (Comcast) internet apparently sucks in terms of reliability, relative to DSL.
3) A reliable phone line for up to a day into a major power outage is pretty cool.
4) I can still get dial-up to work, if both DSL and Cable flake out. (Though that's mostly just done for laughs, at that point.)
5) I actually like the opportunity to respond to political polls like Pew Research, PPP, and the like. They don't call cell lines anywhere near so often, due to cost factors.
6) The sound quality is better, which is helpful for the weekly call to my elderly parents.

Granted, if money got tight, it would be almost certainly ditched. But for now....
 
2013-07-28 11:42:40 AM  
The call clarity argument goes straight out the window once VoLTE gets here. I have had a chance to demo the technology and it makes landline phone voice quality seem downright shiatty.

Continuation of landlines in urban areas doesn't really make a lot of sense, but in rural areas I can see why folks are in a panic...

/ You know who else loved landline phones
// they work in a bunker even after power has failed

img853.imageshack.us
 
2013-07-28 11:46:04 AM  
ReapTheChaos:

Holding that little credit card sized POS for any length of time is a pain in the ass too


That is usually true when you're constipated.Eat some prunes
 
2013-07-28 11:46:58 AM  

Flint Ironstag: here to help: Waldo Pepper: but it is sad to see you equate overpriced cell phones and service with importance.

My point was it is unlikely you are important enough to anyone in society that it is absolutely imperative you can be reached at all times. The vast majority of calls made on celphones is inane jibber jabber that could wait until you get home or to your office. It's a waste of time, money and brainpower.

But you knew that's what I meant, didn't you?

Cellphones aren't anything to do with how "important" you are, and haven't been since the day of Yuppies. Now it's "wife has gone to the store and I've just noticed we're out of mayo but iI can call her" or "I'm stuck in traffic and going to be late so I should call", common everyday occurances where having a cellphone has made a huge ddifference to everyday life.


So your argument is that cell phones are important because they let us maintain appearances while being forgetful and not planning for normal eventualities I take it?

The reality of cell phones as toys dawned on me when a douche that I went out for drinks with sat at the sidewalk table and pulled up "weather.com" to check the weather....While we were sitting outside.  I'm guessing that 99% of all cell phone use is just as important.
 
2013-07-28 11:46:58 AM  
Same boat as lots of other commenters here: cell reception is pretty much non-existant at our house. For the longest time, we stuck with an expensive landline. It was partly for the convenience, and partly because we had Comcast for our ISP. I tried Vonage, but Comcast would throttle my bandwidth whenever I picked up the phone down to 128K, and voice sounded like you were talking through glass underwater.

Eventually we switched over to UVerse because we were sick of Comcast's crappy service, so we tried out Magic Jack for a phone service to try and trim the budget. Night and day difference. We quickly ditched the POTS and are now paying $30 a year for unlimited phone service. We have a three handset phone system plugged in to the system, so it's the best of both worlds.

If we lose power, the UVerse router has a UPS, so we can still email / FB / Skype / Facetime / etc. Our phone handsets can't transmit to the base station, but if there's a real emergency, I just dig and old phone out of storage and plug it into the wall. Even if you don't have POTS service, you can still make 911 calls over the installed copper.
 
2013-07-28 11:47:49 AM  
Say 'city-centric' folk. Do ya'll have any idea what cell-signal strength is like out here in Sweetwater County Wyoming? North of Winnemucca, NV? West of Plentywood, Montana? One cell tower south of Lake City Colorado, which is surrounded by 14,000 foot peaks?

Landlines are not going anywhere.
 
2013-07-28 11:51:32 AM  
DVD: Alright, I'll give you that, but 'allowed to' is a big thing.  There was another up the thread that basically echoed a thought that some folks have that 'you aren't important enough to...' have emergency services?  Have civilization available beyond the willingness of the 1% in charge to allow it?  The telcos in charge may not want to provide the service, but I'm pretty sure they don't want to allow any competition to step in and make it work either.  Just look at Google Fiber's stories and the fight given to muni-broadband even when the telcos had no plans to provide a similar service.

The ' allowed to ' part becomes addressed more when we elect enough of the government to respond to growing conditions of 'have not' like what the South was before the 30s.   The corporate 1% at the time didn't want to provide services to much of that region, but (and I'd have to read more myself, but it fits typical behavior), I'd bet that the lack of development there was also due to their hamstringing of anyone that was willing to try.

The telco lobby is massive.  You can be certain they have the FCC in their back pocket, but in order to maintain the facade that they're impartial, the FCC makes these motions by the telcos to slurp one another up appear difficult or impossible at times when it appears it will least serve the telcos, depending on their public presence.
For example, AT&T proposed acquisition of T-Mobile was denied, and yet notice AT&T was never called out for not honoring its promise to expand and improve its network, even as they signed a deal with Apple that they knew would place a nearly crippling load on their system.
Meanwhile, T-Mobile quietly gobbles up MetroPCS.  As far as the FCC and the lobbyists are concerned, the only players worthy of participating in competition are the ones that came early to the game and are now the biggest ones. (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint).  T-Mobile's acquisition of MetroPCS is a huge jump for them, but even with that they're still behind the "big guns", so they can continue eating up other companies; not to gain access to better or improved network reach, but to snack up all those tasty paying subscribers.

So yeah, believe me, once the original landline agreement is allowed to lapse, nobody in the government is going to suggest a new agreement to accommodate modern digital services, because the lobbyists are paying them far too well NOT to do so.
 
2013-07-28 11:52:38 AM  
Also, for those here who say they still want an emergency phone:

My wife has no need for a regular service cell phone - she only carries it for emergencies. She's had a pre-paid flip phone phone from Virgin Mobile for years now, and pays $20 every three months to keep it active. That gives her about 100 minutes of talk time, and she's never run out of minutes. She does all her talking on the home phone :)

(My VM plan is $30 a month for 250 minutes of talk and unlimited data, and I've never run out of talk minutes either.)
 
2013-07-28 11:58:15 AM  

JohnTuttle: Also, for those here who say they still want an emergency phone:

My wife has no need for a regular service cell phone - she only carries it for emergencies. She's had a pre-paid flip phone phone from Virgin Mobile for years now, and pays $20 every three months to keep it active. That gives her about 100 minutes of talk time, and she's never run out of minutes. She does all her talking on the home phone :)

(My VM plan is $30 a month for 250 minutes of talk and unlimited data, and I've never run out of talk minutes either.)


Heh, $50 gives me unlimited everything on 4G-LTE with MetroPCS.  Sadly, I'm waiting for the hammer to fall on that stellar deal because I'm on MetroPCS (see my previous post). :(
 
2013-07-28 12:01:01 PM  
That and as long as the internet sometimes goes down in a city rendering internet/phone/tv packages useless in a crisis, yet phone lines remain active.  Then I'd say a landline will continue to be used
 
2013-07-28 12:04:02 PM  

cwolf20: That and as long as the internet sometimes goes down in a city rendering internet/phone/tv packages useless in a crisis, yet phone lines remain active.  Then I'd say a landline will continue to be used


There's a point there too.  During 9/11 and Katrina, cell networks were jammed solid with idiots calling one another to spread the news, blocking out real emergency calls for help.  Sometimes there's such a thing as having  toomuch ready access to technology.
Those same networks that were designed to carry voice calls were only marginally upgraded to accommodate data, but I'd wager the bulk of traffic being carried right now is largely Facebook and Instagram noise.
 
2013-07-28 12:11:49 PM  
Heh, $50 gives me unlimited everything on 4G-LTE with MetroPCS.  Sadly, I'm waiting for the hammer to fall on that stellar deal because I'm on MetroPCS (see my previous post). :(

Same with VM, $50 for unlimited everything.

I just checked usage on my phone (finally had the money banked for a VM iPhone!) and I've used a little over 800 meg in downloaded data. That much usage would mean a $30 / month data plan from ATT. I cannot understand why people willingly waste so much money on cell service.
 
2013-07-28 12:17:08 PM  

ItachiNai: It's pathetic that there are still people who have to worry about things like long distance charges.

Then again, it's also pathetic that there are still massive dead zones in populated areas that force people into using land lines just to communicate in the first place.   As long as the telcos refuse to expand their cellular and internet infrastructure (you know, like they promised the FCC they would do well over a decade ago), people living in those zones, regardless of their technical prowess, will still be forced to use archaic technology.

My dad has DSL through the only company that offers any kind of broadband in the area.  He's paying for 5MB down, and gets 1.5.  If he's lucky.  The ISP says that's just how it goes, so he's SOL for any kind of modern day communication unless he's willing to deal with constant lag and dropouts on even simple voice chats (the line also has random latency spikes the ISP refuses to investigate.)  YAY for deregulation!!  >:(


The cell companies and telco's haven't expanded their network and infrastructure in over 10 years?  Cell and internet today is just like it was in, say, 2000?  You're kidding. right?
 
2013-07-28 12:18:30 PM  

here to help: Waldo Pepper: but it is sad to see you equate overpriced cell phones and service with importance.

My point was it is unlikely you are important enough to anyone in society that it is absolutely imperative you can be reached at all times. The vast majority of calls made on celphones is inane jibber jabber that could wait until you get home or to your office. It's a waste of time, money and brainpower.

But you knew that's what I meant, didn't you?


well to be honest you came across rather smug about it.  but I do agree about how important people feel that being able to be reached 24/7.  I have yet to figure out what people are talking about at 6 a.m in rush hour (not all are conf calls) or 11 p.m at night.

Could it be part of the reason the economy is suffering is the high cost of cell phones.  back in my day a 20 year old living at home, going to community college and working sure was kicking out $100+ a month for a phone bill
 
2013-07-28 12:18:42 PM  

tachiNai: It's pathetic that there are still people who have to worry about things like long distance charges.

Then again, it's also pathetic that there are still massive dead zones in populated areas that force people into using land lines just to communicate in the first place.  As long as the telcos refuse to expand their cellular and internet infrastructure (you know, like they promised the FCC they would do well over a decade ago), people living in those zones, regardless of their technical prowess, will still be forced to use archaic technology.


You might be surprised to learn that other countries

1) Have a literal telco monopoly, making it much to nickel and dime consumers for everything
2) Have a different geological constraints (and population densities) than CONUS, resulting in higher operating and maintenance costs for their telco infrastructures.

Also, when you have to start dealing with old people on a regular basis (like say, your parents when they hit 99), they might be resistant to newer technology and opt to stick with the telecom technology they are familiar with.  That might entail costs such as long distance.
 
2013-07-28 12:25:50 PM  

Turbo Cojones: Flint Ironstag: here to help: Waldo Pepper: but it is sad to see you equate overpriced cell phones and service with importance.

My point was it is unlikely you are important enough to anyone in society that it is absolutely imperative you can be reached at all times. The vast majority of calls made on celphones is inane jibber jabber that could wait until you get home or to your office. It's a waste of time, money and brainpower.

But you knew that's what I meant, didn't you?

Cellphones aren't anything to do with how "important" you are, and haven't been since the day of Yuppies. Now it's "wife has gone to the store and I've just noticed we're out of mayo but iI can call her" or "I'm stuck in traffic and going to be late so I should call", common everyday occurances where having a cellphone has made a huge ddifference to everyday life.

So your argument is that cell phones are important because they let us maintain appearances while being forgetful and not planning for normal eventualities I take it?

The reality of cell phones as toys dawned on me when a douche that I went out for drinks with sat at the sidewalk table and pulled up "weather.com" to check the weather....While we were sitting outside.  I'm guessing that 99% of all cell phone use is just as important.


you know if you can't decide whether to buy a jar of mayo or not maybe just maybe you shouldn't be shopping.  When in doubt buy the mayo you will use it up.  There was a redbox thread earlier about people taking forever to decide what to rent at the box, these same folks are the ones who will get on the phone and go over every movie. Use your brain and pick a movie, hopefully you know your family/friends well enough to pick wisely.

Life isn't perfect and if you make the wrong choice well you might just have a fun moment to remember in the future. "dude remember that horrible movie you rented." "omg yea that was so bad". but doubtful if 10 years later you will remember renting Avengers and watching it with your friends.
 
2013-07-28 12:26:21 PM  
No one noticed that both of the people in the picture are holding wireless "landline" phones?
 
2013-07-28 12:30:10 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Cellphones aren't anything to do with how "important" you are, and haven't been since the day of Yuppies. Now it's "wife has gone to the store and I've just noticed we're out of mayo but iI can call her" or "I'm stuck in traffic and going to be late so I should call", common everyday occurances where having a cellphone has made a huge ddifference to everyday life.


Society managed not collapse before we had those minor conveniences and I do not see the cost to benefit ratio being anywhere near equal. Most people have them because they feel they are expected to. Some folks seem shocked when I tell them I don't have a cel and even if I did I'd still tell them I don't. When I had one and gave out the number, even to people that I needed to stay in contact with (before I had a landline) they'd inevitably call me and burn through my minutes when they could have just waited until I saw them next.
 
2013-07-28 12:31:12 PM  
I just bought a land line phone. When I call subby's mom's chat line, I hate when I run out of battery on the cell.
 
2013-07-28 12:33:54 PM  

RickN99: The cell companies and telco's haven't expanded their network and infrastructure in over 10 years?  Cell and internet today is just like it was in, say, 2000?  You're kidding. right?


Okay, fair enough, I wasn't very clear there.
They haven't expanded their networks to appropriately to keep pace with their subscription rate.  They've been in straight reactionary mode, expanding only when absolutely necessary, and only after they've sold a lot of people on services or capabilities that they don't actually have yet.

AT&T sold a lot of people on the iPhone.  They knew they'd have a massive customer uptake specifically for the data capabilities, but didn't bother to ensure the network could handle the load.  They waited until they'd realized the peak adoption rate before they begrudgingly began to expand the network to address the massive outcry about dropped calls, and general false advertising about available network speeds.
They (the telcos) then turned around and started crowing about "4G", knowing it was really little more than a marketing term, but that people would snap at it anyway.  That got them another influx of customers and upgraders, and again only after people realized what was really going on did they actually do any network improvements.  At that point, once they really could start offering a tangible improvement in speed, they dropped the charade and started calling it "4G LTE" (which is really what they were claiming 4G was supposed to have been in the first place).

Basically nobody is upgrading their infrastructure in advance to offer new and faster technologies to their customers.  What they're doing is selling the concept first, milking every dime they can from it, then doing the upgrade when their customers start demanding what they paid for, (often under threat of a class-action lawsuit).
 
2013-07-28 12:34:17 PM  
Also my husband who insists we pay for a landline that we never use "in case of emergencies".  I've given up asking him what sort of emergency would overtake us in our populated area that would wipe out our cell phones, computers AND ability to walk or drive to a neighbor's house or a store that would leave our landline intact.
 
2013-07-28 12:37:08 PM  
For those who were old enough in 1984 to hate changes such as the breakup of Ma Bell, the former Bell System subsidiary that leases landline telephones, as was done under the old AT&T monopoly,  still exists and collects $5.95 a month to lease this:
i.imgur.com
 
2013-07-28 12:39:54 PM  
As those over the age of 65 eventually pass into history, so will the traditional copper phone line.
I've been repair tech, dealing with all aspects of office machines for over 30 years.  With the telcos
not wanting (for obvious reasons $$$) to replace copper trunk lines, you see this more and more, because
it is cheaper to pump liquid nitrogen into the lines to dry them out, than to repair them.

i392.photobucket.com

Just in the last year, I was able to convince my parents, to ditch their "landline" since they hardly ever
used it, and were spending, with taxes, 30 bucks a month on the phone.  They did the "but what happens
if the power goes out, the cell tower won't work".  Ummm...parents, what kind of landline phone do you have?
Well, cordless of course.  Ummmm...how is it powered?  It's battery powered.  Ummm...and the base station where you charge it?  The wall outlet, duh....ummmm...and if the AC goes out, how is the base station going
to work?   Then they gave me one of those deer in the headlights looks, and said they would cancel their landline phone.
 
2013-07-28 12:42:10 PM  

Shadowknight: Waldo Pepper: The nice thing about old fashion landlines (not internet or fios) they always work. If you have a power failure and a standard old phone, you have service and it is great service. No issues with trying to charge your cell phone in your car, no worries about dropped calls

I live in a small rural town and cell service sucks. I have to step out of the house and take a walk to get decent cell reception. My landline just pick up the phone and no worries.

KidneyStone: I'm lucky to get one bar at my house so I need a landline.

Hell, I'm sitting outside and only have one bar showing. Talking on my cell at home is like typing without half of the keys.

Verizon carries a network extender.   I'd imagine most carriers do.  Makes a world of difference.


Actually, most carriers (worldwide) do not offer small cells routed over the public Internet. They're concerned about the security and reliability of the customer's ADSL or cable connection, and the possibility of the small cell causing radio interference to the surrounding cellular network.
 
2013-07-28 12:42:15 PM  
Well, the Feds still need a warrant if they want to tap your land line.
 
2013-07-28 12:43:39 PM  

Waldo Pepper: well to be honest you came across rather smug about it.


Imma cel phone hipster. ;-)

Waldo Pepper: Could it be part of the reason the economy is suffering is the high cost of cell phones


For sure it is. Lots of wasted productivity and tons of cash being funneled directly into the pockets of massive communications moguls never getting a chance to hit the street level economy. Most employed by those companies are overseas too and their infrastructure is heavily subsidized with tax dollars. There is no tangible product that retains usefulness or value over time (except knowledge but how much actual useful knowledge is put through the system). The physical devices are designed to become obsolete within a year or so so they end up in landfills AND you get the added benefit of feeding into a massive surveillance database furthering a pseudo police state. Oh and let's not forget the sweatshops where this crap is made.

I mean that's not to say they are completely useless. They are great for emergencies and keeping certain aspects of businesses flowing but they aren't the necessity most have been made to believe they are. Just another shiny thing to keep you distracted and handing over fistfuls of cash.
 
2013-07-28 12:44:56 PM  
Digital phone landlines are where it's at yo! SuddenLink told me so!! Actually, I love their latest gimmick; that cellphones and crappy reception means emergency personnel have absolutely no way whatsoever to triangulate your position, even though e-911 GPS has been mandated for phones for 10 years now. They also, in another commercial commented how cell phones are useless in an area wide emergency if towers get knocked out. Umm.....if the power goes out, so does the digital phone. It also goes out if you don't pay your cable bill. But that part is always left out.
 
2013-07-28 12:48:04 PM  

p51d007: They did the "but what happens
if the power goes out, the cell tower won't work". Ummm...parents, what kind of landline phone do you have?
Well, cordless of course. Ummmm...how is it powered? It's battery powered. Ummm...and the base station where you charge it? The wall outlet, duh....ummmm...and if the AC goes out, how is the base station going


Which is why you keep a hard wire phone around for power outages. My phone is actually through the cable company so the line goes through the modem but it has batteries to keep the phone going. At least I think that's how it's supposed to work. I haven't tested it.
 
2013-07-28 12:48:31 PM  

Man On A Mission: If I give up my landline, how will I be able to call my cell when I can't remember where I set it down in the house?


Exactly
 
2013-07-28 12:50:00 PM  

tiamet4: Also my husband who insists we pay for a landline that we never use "in case of emergencies".  I've given up asking him what sort of emergency would overtake us in our populated area that would wipe out our cell phones, computers AND ability to walk or drive to a neighbor's house or a store that would leave our landline intact.


before I moved to NC, I was up in nova and didn't want to totally give up my landline, had the number for 20 years and this keep me in the white pages which allowed old family friends (parents friends mainly) to contact me in case of emergency well to be honest in case of death.  

I called verizon and for once got a customer service person who truly helped, I kept my landline for $13 a month, no long distance and if I made an outgoing call it would cost but I could take as many any coming calls and make as many 800 calls that i wanted.

Perfect for calling business 800 lines as this gave me clear communication and if someone need to call. Also gave faster 911 if something happened at home/neighborhood.
 
2013-07-28 12:55:58 PM  
I keep on VoIP landline in the house. It comes in handy every now and then. Like for the moments when one's cell voice service goes belly up because your carrier upgraded MTSO or tower software. Then they roll the upgrade back and your phone works again and you get an email saying take it into the store so they can upgrade the firmware. So now that it's upgraded voice and sms work just fine, but no net service or 4G connection.

So I've been haranguing the customer service reps. I'll keep doing it until they escalate me to someone in engineering who understands that they BROKE the main part of the service that I'm paying for.
 
2013-07-28 12:58:42 PM  
If AT&T gives me a *smoking* deal on a landline maybe I'll stick with them after I port the last two landline numbers to Call centric. But I'll be honest despite living in hurricane country I view a generator for A/C, food and water higher up on the list than a land line. Once you've called everyone and said yup I'm fine, there's not much else use for one unless your house is burning down, or you ran out of bullets before you ran out of looters. ;-)
 
2013-07-28 12:59:38 PM  
So everybody here thinks AT&T will just give up their DSL business just like that? Comcast monopoly uberalles?
 
2013-07-28 01:02:16 PM  

here to help: Flint Ironstag: Cellphones aren't anything to do with how "important" you are, and haven't been since the day of Yuppies. Now it's "wife has gone to the store and I've just noticed we're out of mayo but iI can call her" or "I'm stuck in traffic and going to be late so I should call", common everyday occurances where having a cellphone has made a huge ddifference to everyday life.

Society managed not collapse before we had those minor conveniences and I do not see the cost to benefit ratio being anywhere near equal. Most people have them because they feel they are expected to. Some folks seem shocked when I tell them I don't have a cel and even if I did I'd still tell them I don't. When I had one and gave out the number, even to people that I needed to stay in contact with (before I had a landline) they'd inevitably call me and burn through my minutes when they could have just waited until I saw them next.

 
2013-07-28 01:03:42 PM  
We're looking at dumping our landline right now and going cell only.  Has anyone here used Republic?  I hate Sprint, we're with Verizon now and not thrilled, and that kind of leaves us with pre-pay.  Republic says they can save us about $50 bucks a month, and combine that with the landline cost, and we're right at $100 a month off the budget.
 
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