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(Slashdot)   Hackers in San Francisco are using bots, automated scripts to score reservations at popular restaurants   (slashdot.org) divider line 17
    More: Interesting, high-frequency trading, table reservation, restaurants  
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1878 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jul 2013 at 4:57 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-26 04:51:04 PM  
www.semich.assistanceleague.org
 
2013-07-26 05:08:48 PM  
They lost me at "great table at a hot restaurant"

Shill much?
 
2013-07-26 05:12:34 PM  

studebaker hoch: They lost me at "great table at a hot restaurant"

Shill much?


This.

Also, so what?

I suppose a headline of, "People make reservations at restaurants" wouldn't get many hits.
 
2013-07-26 05:12:34 PM  
Like I've said elsewhere about this story, Urbanspoon's reservation API doesn't appear to be designed with sniping prevention in mind. All they would have to do is add an application key or require a login, then add a timer to make sure you're not submitting reservation requests more than every minute or so.
 
2013-07-26 05:26:56 PM  
...and this is how entities like Ticketmaster were born.  Remember that.
 
2013-07-26 05:31:17 PM  
Step 2: Create an exchange for trading your reservations.
 
2013-07-26 05:39:14 PM  
Sigh.

Scraping a page and posting into a form are not "hacking"

Breaking into the restaurant's POS/reservation system and knocking someone from the list and adding your own would be considered hacking.
 
2013-07-26 06:10:20 PM  
Hackers script kiddies in San Francisco are using bots, automated scripts to score reservations at popular restaurants

www.myselfanand.com

// fixed
 
2013-07-26 06:10:33 PM  

ProfessorOhki: Step 2: Create an exchange for trading your reservations.


That was my first thought. If it's just people using software to snipe reservations then I don't see any fuss, but if they're scalping those reservations, then... well, then what? Are there any legal restrictions to making a reservation and then selling it?

Fark lawyers, hear my call!
 
2013-07-26 06:12:51 PM  

Nexzus: Sigh.

Scraping a page and posting into a form are not "hacking"

Breaking into the restaurant's POS/reservation system and knocking someone from the list and adding your own would be considered hacking.


It's closer to hacking than what 90% of the population can manage. For the purposes of journalism, that's usually close enough. If you want better nomenclature, then you should probably be reading Slashd...'oh.

Well, this is a bit awkward, isn't it?
 
2013-07-26 06:16:34 PM  
i.imgur.com
So you're telling me I  can get a reservation at Dorsia?
 
2013-07-26 06:27:31 PM  
I don't want to eat anywhere that's described as a hot restaurant full of self-described foodies. As someone who loves dining out, it's about my worst nightmare. Give me a busy place, the sort of place where you won't get a table on the day, but you will a couple of days before. That's full of normal couples/groups who are going out to have fun. Where the food is well-cooked and well-presented, without someone trying to construct the Guggenheim on a plate. Where you've got time after the meal rather than getting kicked out, where the tables have enough space between them that you aren't squashed in or hearing someone else's conversation.

One of my favourite restaurants is mediocre on a load of levels: the food is average, the service is poor. But there's always a great buzz in there. It's always got a great crowd with people booking the big tables for celebrations, and you always leave feeling like you had a good time.
 
2013-07-26 06:32:36 PM  

farkeruk: I don't want to eat anywhere that's described as a hot restaurant full of self-described foodies.


That's why you take ALL the reservations (from behind 7 proxies, of course), but only one in your real name. Then you can eat in an empty restaurant, devoid of self-proclaimed foodies.

Wow, the service here is great! They've got 3 waiters just for our table!!
 
2013-07-26 07:23:09 PM  

farkeruk: I don't want to eat anywhere that's described as a hot restaurant full of self-described foodies. As someone who loves dining out, it's about my worst nightmare. Give me a busy place, the sort of place where you won't get a table on the day, but you will a couple of days before. That's full of normal couples/groups who are going out to have fun. Where the food is well-cooked and well-presented, without someone trying to construct the Guggenheim on a plate. Where you've got time after the meal rather than getting kicked out, where the tables have enough space between them that you aren't squashed in or hearing someone else's conversation.

One of my favourite restaurants is mediocre on a load of levels: the food is average, the service is poor. But there's always a great buzz in there. It's always got a great crowd with people booking the big tables for celebrations, and you always leave feeling like you had a good time.


After moving back to Southern California, I miss my Mexican restaurant in Illinois. The chips and salsa were awesome. The margaritas were fantastic. The food was usually good and the service was always crappy.

But the regulars loved it, as did I. Wish I could head there tonight.
 
2013-07-27 01:38:58 AM  
here's an idea:

take reservations by phone
write them down in a little book

serve dinner
 
2013-07-27 02:50:18 AM  

Some 'Splainin' To Do: ProfessorOhki: Step 2: Create an exchange for trading your reservations.

That was my first thought. If it's just people using software to snipe reservations then I don't see any fuss, but if they're scalping those reservations, then... well, then what? Are there any legal restrictions to making a reservation and then selling it?

Fark lawyers, hear my call!


Better yet, if you're the popular restaurant, put the reservations up for auction to the highest bidder. If people are willing to go to the trouble of writing scripts, then they probably would kick in an extra fifty or hundred to get a primo table and time.
 
2013-07-27 04:03:01 AM  

jjorsett: Better yet, if you're the popular restaurant, put the reservations up for auction to the highest bidder. If people are willing to go to the trouble of writing scripts, then they probably would kick in an extra fifty or hundred to get a primo table and time.


But that's not cool in the Bay Area, you can't be seen flaunting wealth openly like that. Using technology to get ahead, that's hip.

It's a different kind of douchery up here my friends. :) A better kind, a more organic kind.
 
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