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(CF News 13)   Police officer keeps nude selfies on her work computer, could be forbidden from being a police officer in Florida. Maybe she should try running for New York City mayor instead   (cfnews13.com) divider line 106
    More: Florida, Florida Department, Mayor of New York City, police officers, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, mayors, nude  
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12871 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Jul 2013 at 3:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-26 05:14:27 AM

ThrobblefootSpectre: wallywam1: No.

Um, yes.


Not even a little bit.
 
2013-07-26 05:14:48 AM

serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer.  Computers are computers.

That said, don't take semi-nude selfies in your police uniform.


Well, my police department provides me with a laptop to use, at work.  It is issued to me, for official business, and I'm responsible for its care.  That's a work computer.  They have a right to tell me what can and cannot be on it, restrict what I download or upload, restrict what applications or functions are usable, etc.

Then there's my laptop at home, which I paid for, and they have fark all to do with.

That's the distinction.

If I had pictures of my wang (i don't) on my work computer, I'd rightfully be fired.
If I had pictures of my wang (i don't) on my personal computer, who gives a fark.

That's the distinction.
 
2013-07-26 05:15:44 AM

serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer.Computers are computers.

That said, don't take semi-nude selfies in your police uniform.


Are you in the middle of a brain-fart?
 
2013-07-26 05:20:07 AM

serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer. Computers are computers.


You. You're the sort that likes to talk about ~*THE CLOUD*~ aren't you...
 
2013-07-26 05:21:23 AM

starsrift: "The pictures were discovered during an internal investigation, which started after Dane filed a complaint against another officer. "

Nothing to see here, move along, folks.


Probably standard procedure when you are investigating something like this. I would think that the first thing they would do is check all parties involved computers.

hinten: serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer.  Computers are computers.

That said, don't take semi-nude selfies in your police uniform.


You don't understand the difference between your pen and the pen that the company gave you to do your job?


A lot of people don't. Some people seem to think that because the company issued them a laptop for work, that laptop is now theirs to do what they want with. I have a few friends that act like this, and a couple of them work in IT.

This reminds me of a place I used to work. We were only allowed to use 20 mb of our computer's harddrive to save anything. Instead we had a personal folder on the network and we were supposed to save everything to that or to whatever folder your department had set up. Because it was a "personal" folder, people took that to mean it was their property and they could store whatever they wanted in it. People were getting fired left and right because of some of the stuff they saved to that folder. Sad thing is warnings and emails about proper use were constantly sent out about it, but people still saved non approved stuff in it and complained that it was "their" folder to do what they wanted with when they were fired.
 
2013-07-26 05:34:52 AM
Great, now we know how to get a cop in Florida fired. Blatantly violate the Constitution (which they've sworn to uphold and protect. We've got problems with cops ignoring the 1st and 4th Amendments a lot), nada. Nude and semi-nude selfies on the work 'puter, fired and license threatened.
 
2013-07-26 05:36:52 AM

Tallman: Great, now we know how to get a cop in Florida fired. Blatantly violate the Constitution (which they've sworn to uphold and protect. We've got problems with cops ignoring the 1st and 4th Amendments a lot), nada. Nude and semi-nude selfies on the work 'puter, fired and license threatened.


How was this cop's constitutional rights violated? Her work computer can be checked at anytime by her employer. She doesn't own that computer or anything on it, her employer does.
 
2013-07-26 05:44:46 AM
I don't have a penny Dane. Will you settle for a 50 øre Dane instead?

coinz.eu
 
2013-07-26 05:56:35 AM

wallywam1: ThrobblefootSpectre: wallywam1: No.

Um, yes.

Not even a little bit.


Shrug.  Okay.

(btw, Your IT guy can also tell you how many minutes per day you use each program on your computer, how long you spent browsing the web, the exact list of ip addresses you went to, the names and locations of all files you copied to or from your computer such as from a usb device, the amount of time your computer was idle during the day, how many times you typed keywords such as "hot sex",  and can show you a backup copy of everything you have sent to the company's printers for the past month.   http://employee-monitoring-software-review.toptenreviews.com/ )
 
2013-07-26 06:00:32 AM

wildcardjack: British hot.


Oh, she's not bad on the eyes.

{Scans her Facebook page - sees she "likes" all of the Twilight movies}

"She should be torn into little bitty pieces AND BURIED ALIVE!!!!"
 
2013-07-26 07:00:52 AM

ongbok: Tallman: Great, now we know how to get a cop in Florida fired. Blatantly violate the Constitution (which they've sworn to uphold and protect. We've got problems with cops ignoring the 1st and 4th Amendments a lot), nada. Nude and semi-nude selfies on the work 'puter, fired and license threatened.

How was this cop's constitutional rights violated? Her work computer can be checked at anytime by her employer. She doesn't own that computer or anything on it, her employer does.


I think he means if she had violated someones constitutional rights she'd be ok, but put a selfie on her laptop and the hammer of Thor shall come down upon thee.

/ at least that's what I got out of that
 
2013-07-26 07:06:13 AM
Send a 20 year old to buy guns, get her killed; we'll protect ya. Kill a hostage being released; we'll protect ya. Do 110 on the interstate and cause a traffic fatality; we'll protect you. Taze a 10 year old; we'll protect you.

Naked pictures of yourself on your office computer, that's a forced resignation copper.
 
2013-07-26 07:09:46 AM
Judging by a few of her facebook posts, she like to be spanked as well.
 
2013-07-26 07:27:43 AM
www.everyview.com
 
2013-07-26 07:47:41 AM

serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer.  Computers are computers.

That said, don't take semi-nude selfies in your police uniform.


One is owned by your boss, which is a pretty important distinction.  In most places (especially if there's a published policy in place) you've got no expectation of privacy on equipment owned by your boss.

I agree there's more to the story though.  Fired from this job?  Sure.  Keeping nudes on your work computer warrants a firing.  Go after her ability to be a cop anywhere?  That's way too much.  Unless she's porking kids and animals in the pics, she didn't break any law.
 
2013-07-26 07:52:06 AM
First I thought she was stupid for keeping nude selfies on her work computer.

Then, after a simple Google search revealed her G+ page, I see that she posted her home address publicly.

Now I know she's a moran.
 
2013-07-26 07:59:05 AM

ProfessorOhki: serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer. Computers are computers.

You. You're the sort that likes to talk about ~*THE CLOUD*~ aren't you...


Heh, well BYOD is the buzzword you want here.  It's a whole new paradigm that's really synergizing the marketplace.

I'm just glad my company isn't uptight enough to make me carry two phones everywhere I go.  Or, pull the old "sorry guys, my flight home got canceled so I'm here another day, but I didn't bring my work laptop on vacation with me, so I'll just drop the ball on all the shiat I was supposed to do today" trick.

They tried to impose goofy security theater on our phones at one point though, like you had to have an 8+ character mixed case lock password and give them the ability to remote wipe everything on the phone, if you wanted to read work emails on it.  After a while of people requesting separate work phones or just reducing productivity by not answering emails away from their desks, company realized it wasn't worth the cost and rescinded the policy.

Seems to me that somebody who fires employees because of an image they stored on a computer that only they have regular access to is making the same mistake.  Not only that but they're going so far as to blackball her so she never works in the state again?  Ridiculous.
 
2013-07-26 08:04:35 AM

serial_crusher: ProfessorOhki: serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer. Computers are computers.

You. You're the sort that likes to talk about ~*THE CLOUD*~ aren't you...

Heh, well BYOD is the buzzword you want here.  It's a whole new paradigm that's really synergizing the marketplace.

I'm just glad my company isn't uptight enough to make me carry two phones everywhere I go.  Or, pull the old "sorry guys, my flight home got canceled so I'm here another day, but I didn't bring my work laptop on vacation with me, so I'll just drop the ball on all the shiat I was supposed to do today" trick.

They tried to impose goofy security theater on our phones at one point though, like you had to have an 8+ character mixed case lock password and give them the ability to remote wipe everything on the phone, if you wanted to read work emails on it.  After a while of people requesting separate work phones or just reducing productivity by not answering emails away from their desks, company realized it wasn't worth the cost and rescinded the policy.

Seems to me that somebody who fires employees because of an image they stored on a computer that only they have regular access to is making the same mistake.  Not only that but they're going so far as to blackball her so she never works in the state again?  Ridiculous.


In .corp I'd agree.  In this case, it is one more piggy off the street, so I'm not waving the slave laborers controlling life flag.
 
2013-07-26 08:08:26 AM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: ThrobblefootSpectre: A human still has to decide if they are offensive or not.

Are there any job openings? I'd be great at that!




t0.gstatic.com
 
2013-07-26 08:08:40 AM

JustGetItRight: Sure. Keeping nudes on your work computer warrants a firing.


So, here's my CSB.  I have a Dropbox account that I keep various personal data in.  Tax documents, serial numbers, that sort of thing.  I often need to do quick errands from my office desktop that require me to have access to those things, so I'm running Dropbox on my work PC.  That alone probably doesn't warrant a firing in your book, does it?

Now, once upon a time somebody shared some pornographic images with me.  She did so by giving me a link to a publicly shared Dropbox folder.  From the privacy of my own home I clicked that link, thinking it was a straight download link, but ended up syncing the files in that folder to all the machines on my account, including the one at the office.  So, for a brief period of time there was porn on my company-owned hard drive.
When I logged in the next morning Dropbox helpfully popped up its "new files have been added to your dropbox" popups, which of course included some explicit filenames, which of course the guy talking to me at that moment happened to see.  I got a little red faced, deleted the files, and we all got back to work.  Should I have been fired over that?
 
2013-07-26 08:16:07 AM

serial_crusher: JustGetItRight: Sure. Keeping nudes on your work computer warrants a firing.

So, here's my CSB.  I have a Dropbox account that I keep various personal data in.  Tax documents, serial numbers, that sort of thing.  I often need to do quick errands from my office desktop that require me to have access to those things, so I'm running Dropbox on my work PC.  That alone probably doesn't warrant a firing in your book, does it?

Now, once upon a time somebody shared some pornographic images with me.  She did so by giving me a link to a publicly shared Dropbox folder.  From the privacy of my own home I clicked that link, thinking it was a straight download link, but ended up syncing the files in that folder to all the machines on my account, including the one at the office.  So, for a brief period of time there was porn on my company-owned hard drive.
When I logged in the next morning Dropbox helpfully popped up its "new files have been added to your dropbox" popups, which of course included some explicit filenames, which of course the guy talking to me at that moment happened to see.  I got a little red faced, deleted the files, and we all got back to work.  Should I have been fired over that?


Absolutely. Deleting the porn files before sharing them with your male co-worker violates the basic man code. You should have been dismissed and had your man card revoked.
 
2013-07-26 08:25:50 AM

serial_crusher: JustGetItRight: Sure. Keeping nudes on your work computer warrants a firing.

So, here's my CSB.  I have a Dropbox account that I keep various personal data in.  Tax documents, serial numbers, that sort of thing.  I often need to do quick errands from my office desktop that require me to have access to those things, so I'm running Dropbox on my work PC.  That alone probably doesn't warrant a firing in your book, does it?

Now, once upon a time somebody shared some pornographic images with me.  She did so by giving me a link to a publicly shared Dropbox folder.  From the privacy of my own home I clicked that link, thinking it was a straight download link, but ended up syncing the files in that folder to all the machines on my account, including the one at the office.  So, for a brief period of time there was porn on my company-owned hard drive.
When I logged in the next morning Dropbox helpfully popped up its "new files have been added to your dropbox" popups, which of course included some explicit filenames, which of course the guy talking to me at that moment happened to see.  I got a little red faced, deleted the files, and we all got back to work.  Should I have been fired over that?


You might get fired for installing programs on your office computer. That was a no no at my old job. The bastards used Internet Explorer and I got a talking to for installing Firefox. I left on good terms for a better paying job and since I know a lot more about computers than my boss, I get to do whatever now. Also, I'm not sure on the rules or legality, but your company may try to claim ownership or want to browse your Dropbox if it's being accessed through their system. That would suck.
 
2013-07-26 08:30:49 AM
As one of the resident IT geeks, I too think there's much more to this story.

That said, I personally practice keeping an 'air barrier' between work and personal. if Mrs Xaks and I get giggy wit it and take pictures, there are places for those....and they aren't on a work phone.

Personal cell doesn't even get plugged in to work machines.

Work and home do NOT touch. Period. Full stop.

Whatever is done on a work machine, I assume, passes through the CEO and counsel's hands before getting shoveled onto the front page of the daily rag.

That I'm the one that gets the requests to scan user machines/folders for inappropriate shiat and get them canned just means I see what happens when people DON'T do this.
 
2013-07-26 08:59:54 AM
totalfratmove.com

P. Barnes would tase that arse...
 
2013-07-26 09:19:52 AM

Twilight Farkle: On a computer is a cop beside her motorcar,
Fellow officers poking 'round behind her back,
For the Sergeant didn't wear a mac,
Even in the pouring rain.
Very strange.

Penny Dane is on your screen and in your files,
Barely-clad in blue-uniformed style,
She sits and meanwhile back in...

Penny Dane, she was a sergeant with siome nudie pics,
And in her pocket was a letter; she resigned.
She liked to keep her Crown Vic so fine.
'Twas a fine machine.
Never mind...

Penny Dane is on your screen and in your files...


That doesn't even scan. -8 for taking a perfectly good opportunity and crapping on it.
 
2013-07-26 09:43:43 AM

serial_crusher: JustGetItRight: Sure. Keeping nudes on your work computer warrants a firing.

So, here's my CSB.  I have a Dropbox account that I keep various personal data in.  Tax documents, serial numbers, that sort of thing.  I often need to do quick errands from my office desktop that require me to have access to those things, so I'm running Dropbox on my work PC.  That alone probably doesn't warrant a firing in your book, does it?

Now, once upon a time somebody shared some pornographic images with me.  She did so by giving me a link to a publicly shared Dropbox folder.  From the privacy of my own home I clicked that link, thinking it was a straight download link, but ended up syncing the files in that folder to all the machines on my account, including the one at the office.  So, for a brief period of time there was porn on my company-owned hard drive.
When I logged in the next morning Dropbox helpfully popped up its "new files have been added to your dropbox" popups, which of course included some explicit filenames, which of course the guy talking to me at that moment happened to see.  I got a little red faced, deleted the files, and we all got back to work.  Should I have been fired over that?




Yes. "It's theft of time."
 
2013-07-26 10:15:16 AM

serial_crusher: JustGetItRight: Sure. Keeping nudes on your work computer warrants a firing.

So, here's my CSB.  I have a Dropbox account that I keep various personal data in.  Tax documents, serial numbers, that sort of thing.  I often need to do quick errands from my office desktop that require me to have access to those things, so I'm running Dropbox on my work PC.  That alone probably doesn't warrant a firing in your book, does it?

Now, once upon a time somebody shared some pornographic images with me.  She did so by giving me a link to a publicly shared Dropbox folder.  From the privacy of my own home I clicked that link, thinking it was a straight download link, but ended up syncing the files in that folder to all the machines on my account, including the one at the office.  So, for a brief period of time there was porn on my company-owned hard drive.
When I logged in the next morning Dropbox helpfully popped up its "new files have been added to your dropbox" popups, which of course included some explicit filenames, which of course the guy talking to me at that moment happened to see.  I got a little red faced, deleted the files, and we all got back to work.  Should I have been fired over that?


Uhm... do you still have tht link? Just wondering.

/ Oh, and uh, was your 'friend' into 'pho-tog-ro-phy'? Eh? nudge-nudge, wink-wink
// He asks knowingly
 
2013-07-26 10:16:12 AM

4tehsnowflakes: Something stinks really badly about this story.  As in, maybe she had beef with another officer (male?), the superior officer took his side, and then together the good old boys they ran her out of the department by shaming her, showing everyone her selfies, which the first officer (her ex boyfriend?) already had, maybe, and they somehow found their way onto her "work" computer, and she's too farking embarassed to defend herself?

Yes, it's a total outrage, she should never work again the reporter echoes.  FARK!!

she needs ... <seinfeldlawyer.jpg>


Wow....you got really worked up over a story that you just made up. Maybe you should leave fiction writing to the pros.
 
2013-07-26 10:17:32 AM

drjekel_mrhyde: Isn't that a Farkett?
/ first name is of the canine kind


That was my first thought as well...
 
2013-07-26 10:20:56 AM
How can someone be a cop and be so farking dumb when it comes to basic computer security...

Using your work computer for personal pics? Leaving your Facebook open 100% to the public to read...

You're a cop with kids and posting where they go to school?

I mean, seriously??
 
2013-07-26 10:21:41 AM

CMYK and PMS: 4tehsnowflakes: Something stinks really badly about this story.  As in, maybe she had beef with another officer (male?), the superior officer took his side, and then together the good old boys they ran her out of the department by shaming her, showing everyone her selfies, which the first officer (her ex boyfriend?) already had, maybe, and they somehow found their way onto her "work" computer, and she's too farking embarassed to defend herself?

Yes, it's a total outrage, she should never work again the reporter echoes.  FARK!!

she needs ... <seinfeldlawyer.jpg>

Wow....you got really worked up over a story that you just made up. Maybe you should leave fiction writing to the pros.




Some call that, "projection."
 
2013-07-26 10:25:43 AM

Tallman: Great, now we know how to get a cop in Florida fired. Blatantly violate the Constitution (which they've sworn to uphold and protect. We've got problems with cops ignoring the 1st and 4th Amendments a lot), nada. Nude and semi-nude selfies on the work 'puter, fired and license threatened.


Umm............. since when were cops sworn to uphold the constitution?
 
2013-07-26 10:48:02 AM
MagSeven:Also, I'm not sure on the rules or legality, but your company may try to claim ownership or want to browse your Dropbox if it's being accessed through their system. That would suck.

That's the case for me anytime I access something relating to work, doesn't matter if its my personal computer, the computer at the coffee shop, friends smart phone and what have you. Before I can access work related stuff I have to acknowledge that by doing so the federal gubbmint can now access any and all files and programs on the device and or devices connected to any network that it is on.
 
2013-07-26 10:53:40 AM

serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer.  Computers are computers.

That said, don't take semi-nude selfies in your police uniform.


I don't get the joke.
 
2013-07-26 10:54:47 AM

wallywam1: ThrobblefootSpectre: Philbb: As mentioned above, I'd be interested in knowing why someone else was going through her computer looking at images in the first place. I could be that the machine was in for maintenance, upgrade, etc... But, unless she had them in a folder on her desktop labeled something like "Sexy Pics of Me" I don't understand why someone would, officially, scan the machine for dirty pictures.

Many (most?) employers, including government, use software that remotely scans networked computers for forbidden content.  "Forbidden" usually includes - games, unlicensed software, digital media without DRM (ripped music), and yes personal photos.  This all happens automatically, similar to a virus scan.  And this isn't just at mega-secure corporations.  It is extremely common now.

No.


WMI - Windows Management Interface. MS will actually pay your IT guy to do the audit and get the company in line w/ compliance to unlicensed copies of Office, etc.
 
2013-07-26 10:54:51 AM

CMYK and PMS: Tallman: Great, now we know how to get a cop in Florida fired. Blatantly violate the Constitution (which they've sworn to uphold and protect. We've got problems with cops ignoring the 1st and 4th Amendments a lot), nada. Nude and semi-nude selfies on the work 'puter, fired and license threatened.

Umm............. since when were cops sworn to uphold the constitution?




They aren't required to protect either.
 
2013-07-26 10:58:17 AM
She sounds either real dumb or there is more to this. I keep strict seperation of work and home computer usage. The IT dept told me after a project I always have the cleanest laptop. I did get questioned about what fark.com was though. But I never saved or downloaded anything personal to it. They told me the worst offenders were senior partners.
 
2013-07-26 10:58:58 AM

serial_crusher: ProfessorOhki: serial_crusher: I never got this distinction between a "personal" computer and a "work" computer. Computers are computers.

You. You're the sort that likes to talk about ~*THE CLOUD*~ aren't you...

Heh, well BYOD is the buzzword you want here.  It's a whole new paradigm that's really synergizing the marketplace.

I'm just glad my company isn't uptight enough to make me carry two phones everywhere I go.  Or, pull the old "sorry guys, my flight home got canceled so I'm here another day, but I didn't bring my work laptop on vacation with me, so I'll just drop the ball on all the shiat I was supposed to do today" trick.

They tried to impose goofy security theater on our phones at one point though, like you had to have an 8+ character mixed case lock password and give them the ability to remote wipe everything on the phone, if you wanted to read work emails on it.  After a while of people requesting separate work phones or just reducing productivity by not answering emails away from their desks, company realized it wasn't worth the cost and rescinded the policy.

Seems to me that somebody who fires employees because of an image they stored on a computer that only they have regular access to is making the same mistake.  Not only that but they're going so far as to blackball her so she never works in the state again?  Ridiculous.


It amazes me that there are people who think that the "BYOD" thing is going to fly (or, frankly, is even a good thing from the company's perspective).

The reason they fire someone over an image stored on a computer that only they have regular access to is because if they don't do it then they're liable for sexual harassment suits if someone else sees the image.
 
2013-07-26 11:01:08 AM

serial_crusher: JustGetItRight: Sure. Keeping nudes on your work computer warrants a firing.

So, here's my CSB.  I have a Dropbox account that I keep various personal data in.  Tax documents, serial numbers, that sort of thing.  I often need to do quick errands from my office desktop that require me to have access to those things, so I'm running Dropbox on my work PC.  That alone probably doesn't warrant a firing in your book, does it?

Now, once upon a time somebody shared some pornographic images with me.  She did so by giving me a link to a publicly shared Dropbox folder.  From the privacy of my own home I clicked that link, thinking it was a straight download link, but ended up syncing the files in that folder to all the machines on my account, including the one at the office.  So, for a brief period of time there was porn on my company-owned hard drive.
When I logged in the next morning Dropbox helpfully popped up its "new files have been added to your dropbox" popups, which of course included some explicit filenames, which of course the guy talking to me at that moment happened to see.  I got a little red faced, deleted the files, and we all got back to work.  Should I have been fired over that?


If someone else saw it? Absolutely.  How is that any different than you accidentally leaving a copy of Hustler in your work bag and having it fall open when someone is borrowing a pen?
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-07-26 11:21:47 AM

Somacandra: bighairyguy: How big is her penis?

[i.imgur.com image 320x240]

After Chernobyl it fell off.


LOL!!!! Awesome. Thanks for a good laugh.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-07-26 11:22:41 AM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Truecrypt on a flashdrive with a distress partition that has copies of your tax returns or bank statements.

There, was that so hard?


You sound smart.

/TC for the win. Even the DoD and FBI couldn't beat it.
 
2013-07-26 11:29:45 AM

ThrobblefootSpectre: wallywam1: ThrobblefootSpectre: wallywam1: No.

Um, yes.

Not even a little bit.

Shrug.  Okay.

(btw, Your IT guy can also tell you how many minutes per day you use each program on your computer, how long you spent browsing the web, the exact list of ip addresses you went to, the names and locations of all files you copied to or from your computer such as from a usb device, the amount of time your computer was idle during the day, how many times you typed keywords such as "hot sex",  and can show you a backup copy of everything you have sent to the company's printers for the past month.   http://employee-monitoring-software-review.toptenreviews.com/ )


This just in: software can claim to do anything but it doesn't always work and can require more overhead and maintenance that it's worth-- especially at enterprise level.

Also, most companies DON'T want passive monitoring on a large scale. They want to be able to selectively monitor so they don't have to maintain a bunch of overhead and useless data and because it's a liability in case you want to take action against a particular employee. In TFA, it was a local search on the PC itself as part of an investigation. If they monitored everything that was done all the time than on all machines then the target of this hatchet job could demand them to produce all the records of the police chief searching for tentacle porn as well. Management doesn't want that so that's not what they implement.

I'm not arguing about it with you any more. I've been working in IT for 15 years, and all I can say is that this monitoring stuff is meant more as a bogeyman to scare people than add a practical tool on a wide scale.
 
2013-07-26 11:31:31 AM

utah dude: wallywam1: ThrobblefootSpectre: Philbb: As mentioned above, I'd be interested in knowing why someone else was going through her computer looking at images in the first place. I could be that the machine was in for maintenance, upgrade, etc... But, unless she had them in a folder on her desktop labeled something like "Sexy Pics of Me" I don't understand why someone would, officially, scan the machine for dirty pictures.

Many (most?) employers, including government, use software that remotely scans networked computers for forbidden content.  "Forbidden" usually includes - games, unlicensed software, digital media without DRM (ripped music), and yes personal photos.  This all happens automatically, similar to a virus scan.  And this isn't just at mega-secure corporations.  It is extremely common now.

No.

WMI - Windows Management Interface. MS will actually pay your IT guy to do the audit and get the company in line w/ compliance to unlicensed copies of Office, etc.


Completely separate issue.
 
2013-07-26 11:33:41 AM

meanmutton: serial_crusher: JustGetItRight: Sure. Keeping nudes on your work computer warrants a firing.

So, here's my CSB.  I have a Dropbox account that I keep various personal data in.  Tax documents, serial numbers, that sort of thing.  I often need to do quick errands from my office desktop that require me to have access to those things, so I'm running Dropbox on my work PC.  That alone probably doesn't warrant a firing in your book, does it?

Now, once upon a time somebody shared some pornographic images with me.  She did so by giving me a link to a publicly shared Dropbox folder.  From the privacy of my own home I clicked that link, thinking it was a straight download link, but ended up syncing the files in that folder to all the machines on my account, including the one at the office.  So, for a brief period of time there was porn on my company-owned hard drive.
When I logged in the next morning Dropbox helpfully popped up its "new files have been added to your dropbox" popups, which of course included some explicit filenames, which of course the guy talking to me at that moment happened to see.  I got a little red faced, deleted the files, and we all got back to work.  Should I have been fired over that?

If someone else saw it? Absolutely.  How is that any different than you accidentally leaving a copy of Hustler in your work bag and having it fall open when someone is borrowing a pen?


Eh, I work with adults and mistakes happen.  If some snowflake can't handle accidentally seeing a boob or two I'd rather fire them for being a whiny biatch.  It's not harassment if it happens totally unintentionally like that.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-07-26 11:44:28 AM

wallywam1: ThrobblefootSpectre: wallywam1: ThrobblefootSpectre: wallywam1: No.

Um, yes.

Not even a little bit.

Shrug.  Okay.

(btw, Your IT guy can also tell you how many minutes per day you use each program on your computer, how long you spent browsing the web, the exact list of ip addresses you went to, the names and locations of all files you copied to or from your computer such as from a usb device, the amount of time your computer was idle during the day, how many times you typed keywords such as "hot sex",  and can show you a backup copy of everything you have sent to the company's printers for the past month.   http://employee-monitoring-software-review.toptenreviews.com/ )

This just in: software can claim to do anything but it doesn't always work and can require more overhead and maintenance that it's worth-- especially at enterprise level.

Also, most companies DON'T want passive monitoring on a large scale. They want to be able to selectively monitor so they don't have to maintain a bunch of overhead and useless data and because it's a liability in case you want to take action against a particular employee. In TFA, it was a local search on the PC itself as part of an investigation. If they monitored everything that was done all the time than on all machines then the target of this hatchet job could demand them to produce all the records of the police chief searching for tentacle porn as well. Management doesn't want that so that's not what they implement.

I'm not arguing about it with you any more. I've been working in IT for 15 years, and all I can say is that this monitoring stuff is meant more as a bogeyman to scare people than add a practical tool on a wide scale.


I have over 20 years in IT and happen to be a forensics expert (deposed many times in cases to give expert testimony).
You don't have to do passive monitoring with full capture, all you need to do is grab the drive in question and use a tool such as nCase.
You think you got rid of it, but unless you use a multipass low-level wipe and disk reorg tool, I will nail you. Easily. And sell you out pronto.

People, PLEASE think. If you do things on a computer or network that belongs to a company, and they have had you assent to their terms and guidelines, most times you will find verbiage that you agree to any and all monitoring in any method or form, and agree to 'hold harmless', and you cannot sue them, and agree to binding arbitration for all matters of redress.

If you don't own the end device (pc, phone, tablet) or the network don't do things that can be used to cause problems in your life. Or you are STUPID and deserve whatever you get.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-07-26 11:46:14 AM

gja: wallywam1: ThrobblefootSpectre: wallywam1: ThrobblefootSpectre: wallywam1: No.

Um, yes.

Not even a little bit.

Shrug.  Okay.

(btw, Your IT guy can also tell you how many minutes per day you use each program on your computer, how long you spent browsing the web, the exact list of ip addresses you went to, the names and locations of all files you copied to or from your computer such as from a usb device, the amount of time your computer was idle during the day, how many times you typed keywords such as "hot sex",  and can show you a backup copy of everything you have sent to the company's printers for the past month.   http://employee-monitoring-software-review.toptenreviews.com/ )

This just in: software can claim to do anything but it doesn't always work and can require more overhead and maintenance that it's worth-- especially at enterprise level.

Also, most companies DON'T want passive monitoring on a large scale. They want to be able to selectively monitor so they don't have to maintain a bunch of overhead and useless data and because it's a liability in case you want to take action against a particular employee. In TFA, it was a local search on the PC itself as part of an investigation. If they monitored everything that was done all the time than on all machines then the target of this hatchet job could demand them to produce all the records of the police chief searching for tentacle porn as well. Management doesn't want that so that's not what they implement.

I'm not arguing about it with you any more. I've been working in IT for 15 years, and all I can say is that this monitoring stuff is meant more as a bogeyman to scare people than add a practical tool on a wide scale.

I have over 20 years in IT and happen to be a forensics expert (deposed many times in cases to give expert testimony).
You don't have to do passive monitoring with full capture, all you need to do is grab the drive in question and use a tool such as enCase.
You think you got rid of it, b ...

/FTFM, darned fingers
 
2013-07-26 11:56:13 AM

CMYK and PMS: 4tehsnowflakes:

Wow....you got really worked up over a story that you just made up. Maybe you should leave fiction writing to the pros.


You are right, I speculated a lot based on very little hard information.  But most of the farkers seemed to agree that there was something fishy about the story just on its face.  Maybe, after the luscious Sgt. Danes gets over the shame, she will decide to tell her side and we will see.
 
2013-07-26 12:19:19 PM
Subby forgot smokin' hot.
 
2013-07-26 12:22:43 PM
Left disappointed.

You all know why.
 
2013-07-26 03:26:37 PM

jpo2269: [totalfratmove.com image 590x300]

P. Barnes would tase that arse...


One of the funniest videos I've ever seen.
That was farking gold.
 
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