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(SFGate)   Following Asiana fake name debacle, KTVU fires long-time producers Wi Fuk Tup, Took Mai Chob, and Wai Mi   (sfgate.com) divider line 4
    More: Followup, Asiana Airlines, KTVA, KTVU, pseudonyms  
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4755 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Jul 2013 at 9:54 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-25 10:12:12 AM
2 votes:

BunkoSquad: But not the anchorlady reading them out loud on the air, because anchorpeople, as we learned from Ron Burgundy, will read any damn thing you put in front of them and should never be confused with actual professional journalists.


Yep, pretty much. Then again, I'm curious how much processing you'd be doing as you read a teleprompter on a live news broadcast. I have a friend who works at KTVU and is very critical of the industry, but even he doesn't blame the anchors involved as it really isn't their job to be analyzing the scroll.

He did say that multiple people in the newsroom looked at the copy before it went to the prompter. I'm guessing that the people who lost their job were the same people who looked at this and let it go.
2013-07-25 09:59:15 AM
2 votes:
But not the anchorlady reading them out loud on the air, because anchorpeople, as we learned from Ron Burgundy, will read any damn thing you put in front of them and should never be confused with actual professional journalists.
2013-07-25 12:50:04 PM
1 votes:
I do have to applaud the intern's (supposedly the NTSB intern, though I still have a hard time believing that story) epic trolling.

I mean, how many people can say their troll led to the dismissal of several long-time employees at a news station? That's some shiat you should put on a resume.
2013-07-25 12:23:27 PM
1 votes:
FTFA: "...  the episode was emblematic of the pressure news reporters everywhere are under to get information out as quickly as possible."

Here's an idea: how about you feel pressure to get shiat right, rather than getting it quickly?

I've never understood this philosophy that you go on air (or to print to publish on the web) with whatever unsubstantiated bullshiat you can come up with as quickly as possible, and then "correct" it later.

"Correcting" it isn't going to make any goddam difference. By the time that happens (assuming it happens at all), thousands (or hundreds of thousands or millions) of people have already gotten and passed on to others the unsubstantiated bullshiat.

This is why people don't believe "mainstream" news sources anymore and have replaced them with the internet. Not necessarily because it's more convenient and quicker (though it is, obviously), but because the "mainstream" news has proven, over and over again, that they are no more reliable sources of information than some random asshole on the intertubes.

They have only themselves to blame. Esp. TV news. Throwing a dart at a bulletin board full of random shiat you copied and pasted from various websites would be just as reliable as most "reporters" on TV.

As much contempt as I have for Fox News (and they are contemptible), at least they're somewhat upfront about the fact that they're disseminating their own "view" (AKA bullshiat opinions). They're just taking advantage of the other fact, that their viewers are so stupid, they don't care that they're being misinformed. It obviously pays well. If I had no scruples whatsoever, I'd do it too.
 
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