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(Salon)   Salon forgets who their readers are, completely shiats all over Steve Jobs. Hilarity most definitely ensued   (salon.com) divider line 18
    More: Amusing, Nobel Prize in Physiology, deadweight, Robert Fulton, social costs  
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14992 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jul 2013 at 8:44 AM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2013-07-20 08:49:37 AM
6 votes:
Plaster his name in the title, show his picture, then never mention his name in the article?

Go home Salon, you're drunk.
2013-07-20 08:59:56 AM
5 votes:
Steve Jobs was a great American entrepreneur who also thought that drinking more fruit juice would cure his pancreatic cancer holistically; cancer that was almost certainly caused by decades of a fruit and nut diet that pushed his pancreas past the breaking point.

There's a fine line between genius and insanity.  It's interesting how many great innovators stand on both sides.
2013-07-20 09:06:53 AM
3 votes:

Baron Harkonnen: Steve Jobs was a great American entrepreneur who also thought that drinking more fruit juice would cure his pancreatic cancer holistically; cancer that was almost certainly caused by decades of a fruit and nut diet that pushed his pancreas past the breaking point.

There's a fine line between genius and insanity.  It's interesting how many great innovators stand on both sides.


Reading Walter Isaacson's bio of Steve Jobs makes it sound like they succeeded as much despite him as because of him.  Take the iPhone 4, for example: Jobs insisted on having a metal band around its edges, which the engineers (rightfully) told him was a bad idea, because it would block radio signals.  He only budged enough to allow some openings to be put in that metal band, which then led to a problem where you could easily block that opening with your finger as you hold it and lose signal strength, sometimes enough to drop calls.  and then when that was questioned later, he gave his infamous "You're holding it wrong" response, which would have gotten any frontline iPhone support agent fired.  And there's much more like that, like the way his design demands made the original Macintosh far more expensive and underpowered (even by the standards of the day) than it should have been.

It's kind of interesting to think about, with all the "Apple is doooooooooooooooooooooomed without Steve Jobs!" trolls that seem to infest the tech press these days.
2013-07-20 08:50:46 AM
3 votes:
I missed the part where the hilarity ensued. Was it the part where Jobs was featured prominently in the headline but not mentioned in the article?
2013-07-20 08:48:13 AM
3 votes:
Either I woke up too early or that was one boring arse article.
2013-07-20 10:23:36 AM
2 votes:
Patent trolls need to be reigned in. It's like domain parking. No website, no valid claim to the domain. No product, no valid claim to the patent. these companies spring up that buy these patents up and sit on them, then sue other companies for settlements.

It's an extortion scheme, plain and simple.
2013-07-20 08:54:36 AM
2 votes:
I did a quick find on that article's page, and Steve Jobs is only mentioned in the headline, the tags on the article, and the photo credit below.  He is not mentioned at all in the article.

Portrait of Salon's headline writer below:

static.freepik.com
2013-07-21 02:29:12 PM
1 votes:

orbister: HeartBurnKid: Raging Whore Moans: Skyrmion: Our IP laws suck and so did that article.

Our patent system is royally farked but it's unfair to lump good faith businesses (™) and artists (©) in with the patent trolls.

True, those IP laws suck in an entirely different way

/Trademarks are a blunt cudgel, overly used to crush competition
//Copyright has become perpetual, spelling the end of common culture

Physical property does not expire; why should intellectual property? If I inherit a house, I can charge rent on it indefinitely, as can my heirs. It does not become public property 50 (or however many years) after the original builder dies.

Capitalism. Don't you love it?


Physical property and "intellectual property" are two entirely different things.  For example, if I own a house, I can't sue you because your house looks too similar to mine, or even if you deliberately set out to copy my house.

And copyright isn't capitalism.  Capitalism involves the trading of money for goods and services, with values fluctuating based upon the scarcity of the good or service.  Copyright is the creation of a monopoly on a non-scarce good by government fiat.
pla
2013-07-20 11:25:36 AM
1 votes:
Baron Harkonnen : Steve Jobs was a great American entrepreneur who also thought that drinking more fruit juice would cure his pancreatic cancer holistically; cancer that was almost certainly caused by decades of a fruit and nut diet that pushed his pancreas past the breaking point.

You left out the part where he gamed the US organ transplant system to steal a liver from hundreds of other (non-rich) people actually interested in getting real medical care.

Steve Jobs may well have embodied the American Dream, but in a way that makes that not even remotely a compliment.

/ At least Bhopal happened by accident.
2013-07-20 10:41:02 AM
1 votes:

Baron Harkonnen: There's a fine line between genius and insanity.  It's interesting how many great innovators stand on both sides.


Based on Walter Isaacson's bio, Jobs was nothing more than a combination of a sociopath, good salesman and motivator. Also not very bright when his health or family was concerned. His cancer was a rare form of treatable pancreatic cancer but he chose to wait for a year and see if eating large quantities of fruit (which probably caused his condition in the first place) and "alternative medicine" will cure him. That decision almost certainly killed him.
2013-07-20 10:14:26 AM
1 votes:
`Marconi' invented the radio - I've heard that all of my life. What most don't know is that his idea was based on 17 patents by Tesla. Most of todays technology is based on this guys inventions, patents and ideas.
2013-07-20 09:35:20 AM
1 votes:

miss diminutive: Plaster his name in the title, show his picture, then never mention his name in the article?

So he did what some people making submissions to Fark have done?

I wonder if the article writer is someone from Fark?
2013-07-20 09:34:13 AM
1 votes:
I don't think the author of this article should be paid. He is only standing on the shoulders of every other crappy writer. We wouldn't even be able to read this article if not for DARPA.
2013-07-20 09:25:27 AM
1 votes:
I guess its possible that the article writer had a section relating directly to Steve Jobs that Salon removed.
2013-07-20 09:18:59 AM
1 votes:
Of course Jobs didn't make that. Wozniak did.

/ And our patent system sucks. As Buckminster Fuller said, the patent system should be used just for historical attribution, not to prevent people from using ideas.
2013-07-20 08:57:11 AM
1 votes:
Mmmm.... Other than "Steve Jobs" in the title, I didn't see any mention of him in the article. His Strength was marketing of other peoples ideas.
2013-07-20 08:54:11 AM
1 votes:
The American patent system is based on what Gar Alperovitz calls "the hero inventor" ideology, the belief that one man or woman working diligently and independently on a project drives innovation by upending the status quo.

I don't think it's that at all. I think the problem is a deliberately overworked and underfunded Patent Office that doesn't have the time to read patent applications that are deliberately written in a confusing, complicated way and so they end up granting overly broad patents. The intent is to stifle competition but every once in a while, one of these overly-broad patents comes back to bite a big company in the ass.
2013-07-20 08:48:58 AM
1 votes:
Steve Jobs didn't invent things, but he would prod buttock until he got an elegant product.

After all, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. He didn't flatter.
 
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