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(CNN)   Amazon truly has everything. Books, electronics, the Saturn V rocket engines from the Apollo 11 mission, and streaming movies too   (cnn.com) divider line 28
    More: Followup, Apollo, Amazon CEO, Amazon, rockets, Jeff Bezos, motive powers, electric cables, remotely operated vehicles  
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2095 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Jul 2013 at 1:02 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-20 01:14:34 AM
First anniversary without Neil around to see it... makes me sad.
 
2013-07-20 01:17:52 AM
EBay has a better selection, but you're stuck with PayPal.
 
2013-07-20 01:18:55 AM

Any Pie Left: First anniversary without Neil around to see it... makes me sad.


Yeah. Will this cheer you up? Because it does for me

www.badassoftheweek.com

/hot like an ablative shield
 
2013-07-20 01:21:26 AM
The alleged Apollo 11 mission.
 
2013-07-20 01:42:13 AM

Aye Carumba: The alleged Apollo 11 mission.


Notsureifserious.jpg
 
2013-07-20 01:49:16 AM
Bezos should have done his homework. The Saturn V launch system will get you to the moon in four days -- that's a full two days late for Prime deliveries.
 
2013-07-20 01:56:50 AM
Will my Amazon Prime membership cover free shipping?
 
2013-07-20 02:20:00 AM
What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.
 
2013-07-20 03:05:57 AM
In all seriousness, I know that Amazon Prime includes access to their streaming video library, but it's nigh on impossible to browse. You can search or look through a short list of popular choices in various genres and that seems to be it. Does anyone know of a site or resource with a proper catalogue of their selections?
 
2013-07-20 03:19:40 AM

Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.


because he has an enourmous fortune and he wanted to?
 
2013-07-20 03:46:55 AM
Jeff, don't you have better things to do?
 
2013-07-20 05:07:17 AM

Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.


That's like saying there's nothing special about the Liberty Bell, because there are brand new bells that are in much better condition.
 
2013-07-20 05:08:13 AM
Oh and also, to whomever suggested Kerbal Space Program to me in one of these threads, you're the reason why I'm still up at 5am on a Saturday.  Stupid orbital insertion...
 
2013-07-20 06:41:25 AM
Yeah, that thing is maybe in acceptable condition and has no sales rank.

I'd pick it up for $2. I'll probably lose on the shipping.

/Marketplace Dealer.
 
2013-07-20 07:46:26 AM
www.raymondaustin.com

These guys are going to be thrilled.
 
2013-07-20 07:59:24 AM

Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.


That engine is a piece of history, and for those of us who are history buffs love to see and touch the actual thing from that time.  Picard described it best in the First Contact movie when he and Data were having a moment with the Phoenix.  "..touch can connect you to an object in a very personal way, make it seem more real. "

I doubt when this goes on display people can actually touch it, but seeing it will be close enough.
 
2013-07-20 08:15:32 AM

Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.


My understanding from other threads is that they aren't in better condition nor are they complete with all the pumps and ancillary equipment needed to fire.   Not that you'd want to fire up an engine that's spent all those years at the bottom of the ocean but if you no longer had the blueprints on how to make them (which again, according to Fark threads is also true) getting the most complete example possible is probably a good place to start reverse engineering them.
 
2013-07-20 09:02:27 AM

Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean?


Add to that, NASA usually claims perpetual ownership of all rocket parts and debris and will come repossess them as 'government property', even decades later

'We still own them, you stole them from our underwater storage unit!'
 
2013-07-20 09:13:24 AM

Vaneshi: Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.

My understanding from other threads is that they aren't in better condition nor are they complete with all the pumps and ancillary equipment needed to fire.   Not that you'd want to fire up an engine that's spent all those years at the bottom of the ocean but if you no longer had the blueprints on how to make them (which again, according to Fark threads is also true) getting the most complete example possible is probably a good place to start reverse engineering them.


Uh. No.

http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/04/how-nasa-brought-the-monstrou s- f-1-moon-rocket-back-to-life/
 
2013-07-20 09:24:49 AM

Vaneshi: Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.

My understanding from other threads is that they aren't in better condition nor are they complete with all the pumps and ancillary equipment needed to fire.   Not that you'd want to fire up an engine that's spent all those years at the bottom of the ocean but if you no longer had the blueprints on how to make them (which again, according to Fark threads is also true) getting the most complete example possible is probably a good place to start reverse engineering them.


There is at least one complete unit in Huntsville and they are successfully reverse engineering it. They have the plans as well, the big issue is the changes made as each one was handmade, and in an era before computer controlled machining every part was just a little out of spec.
 
2013-07-20 10:25:33 AM

FrancoFile: These guys are going to be thrilled.


And... Leaving satisfied.
 
2013-07-20 11:03:23 AM
Those old F-1 engines are a work of art. That alone should be a reason to raise em.
 
2013-07-20 11:23:34 AM

EponymousCowHerd: Vaneshi: Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.

My understanding from other threads is that they aren't in better condition nor are they complete with all the pumps and ancillary equipment needed to fire.   Not that you'd want to fire up an engine that's spent all those years at the bottom of the ocean but if you no longer had the blueprints on how to make them (which again, according to Fark threads is also true) getting the most complete example possible is probably a good place to start reverse engineering them.

Uh. No.

http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/04/how-nasa-brought-the-monstrou s- f-1-moon-rocket-back-to-life/


Excellent article. Thanks for the link.
 
2013-07-20 12:24:47 PM
Seeing as how we didn't go there, sure, why not sell them?

/Soon you'll be telling me the Earth is round, and females have "orgasms" too
 
2013-07-20 03:25:25 PM

The All-Powerful Atheismo: Jeff, don't you have better things to do?


You'll get over it.
 
2013-07-20 11:19:22 PM

cameroncrazy1984: Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.

That's like saying there's nothing special about the Liberty Bell, because there are brand new bells that are in much better condition.


No, because the Liberty Bell was a one-off. The F-1 engines were not one-offs as there is more than just one example and those other examples are for all practical purposes identical
 
2013-07-21 12:44:26 AM

Befuddled: cameroncrazy1984: Befuddled: What's the point of spending a small fortune to find junk on the bottom of the ocean? There's nothing special about those particular rocket engines; they are the same as the other examples of F-1 engines that still exist, only that the other examples are in far better condition.

That's like saying there's nothing special about the Liberty Bell, because there are brand new bells that are in much better condition.

No, because the Liberty Bell was a one-off. The F-1 engines were not one-offs as there is more than just one example and those other examples are for all practical purposes identical


How many of those sent a man to the moon for the first time in human history?
 
2013-07-21 03:21:28 AM

cameroncrazy1984: How many of those sent a man to the moon for the first time in human history?


How would you know the difference between one of the F-1 engines that was used in that launch and one that was never used other than the plaque in front of it?

I think that the F-1 engines are pretty interesting, just that any one example is not more interesting than any other example.

If Bezos wanted to "inspire something amazing" then maybe he should have invested in research rather than finding a curio at the bottom of the ocean.
 
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