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(Network World)   "This is a 3D printed jet engine," says GE. And it's presumably for the world's smallest 3D printed jet   (networkworld.com) divider line 79
    More: Interesting, jet engines, circuit breakers, Texas Instruments, Hartford Courant  
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3671 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Jul 2013 at 10:01 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-19 09:10:04 AM
Paging Quantum Apostrophe to thread 7850076. Paging Quantum Apostrophe to 7850076.
 
2013-07-19 10:04:57 AM
You said 3D printed twice.
 
2013-07-19 10:09:29 AM
NO! We will never 3D print a jet engine or any meaningful part of it. I say this knowing that it is short if impossible to predict where technology will go. I am positive it won't go there.

If I recall correctly, those compressor blades are made of single crystal nickle super alloys. The thought of printing that is insane.
 
2013-07-19 10:12:33 AM

hardinparamedic: Paging Quantum Apostrophe to thread 7850076. Paging Quantum Apostrophe to 7850076.


what are you doing?!


It's bad enough to have him troll without being invited to do so from the start.

/ok everyone, just act cook and pretend he's not here.
/we might be able to save this threat yet.
 
2013-07-19 10:13:03 AM

hardinparamedic: Paging Quantum Apostrophe to thread 7850076. Paging Quantum Apostrophe to 7850076.


Time for him to move the goal posts again.
 
2013-07-19 10:13:55 AM

Cambrian: You said 3D printed twice.


they REALLY like 3d printing.

www.theboxset.com
 
2013-07-19 10:13:59 AM

way south: hardinparamedic: Paging Quantum Apostrophe to thread 7850076. Paging Quantum Apostrophe to 7850076.

what are you doing?!
It's bad enough to have him troll without being invited to do so from the start.

/ok everyone, just act cook and pretend he's not here.
/we might be able to save this threat yet.


Says you. I thought he was priceless choking after the 3D printed gun came out.
 
2013-07-19 10:14:03 AM

way south: hardinparamedic: Paging Quantum Apostrophe to thread 7850076. Paging Quantum Apostrophe to 7850076.

what are you doing?!
It's bad enough to have him troll without being invited to do so from the start.

/ok everyone, just act cook and pretend he's not here.
/we might be able to save this threat yet.


On a side note, I'm really starting to fate autocorrect...
 
2013-07-19 10:14:49 AM
Tip-toes carefully into thread...I'll be right over here, waiting to be called LIAR!!!

/not obscure if you watch 3d printing threads...
 
2013-07-19 10:15:21 AM

Carousel Beast: Says you. I thought he was priceless choking after the 3D printed gun came out.


His meltdowns in space threads are comedy gold.

way south: On a side note, I'm really starting to fate autocorrect...


HAHAHAHA
 
2013-07-19 10:17:04 AM
Waiting for MakerBot to release a printer that prints in metal and costs $100.

Who am I kidding? The cartridges will cost $3000 apiece.
 
2013-07-19 10:22:37 AM
What is this? A jet engine for ANTS?
 
2013-07-19 10:31:03 AM
Seems like some people here need to reread the posting rules:

http://www.fark.com/farq/posting/#What_are_the_posting_rules.3F


Calling out of other Farkers (in headlines): As odd as this may sound, not everyone wants attention on Fark. Specifically mentioning a fellow Farker in a headline or post (where the named Farker isn't participating) generates attention to a Farker who didn't intend it. This is not welcome on this site. If you have something to say to a particular Farker (and it isn't abusive), check their profile for an email address and go directly to the source. Comments and headlines about specific Farkers will likely be deleted, as not everyone needs or wants to see their name in bright lights, and most often, the attention is undesired.
 
2013-07-19 10:31:19 AM

b2theory: If I recall correctly, those compressor blades are made of single crystal nickle super alloys. The thought of printing that is insane.


wait wait wait ... you're saying that those huge blades that we all can see when we look into the front of a jet engine - those things are each one huge crystal? That's insane. How do they even MAKE those?
 
2013-07-19 10:31:25 AM
When it comes to precision, 3D printing doesn't have it, yet.

That said, 3D printing could be used in a meaningful way today by making a rough part and then taking it to a CNC mill for final dimensions*. The material savings alone would be in the tens of billions a year.

/ * This assumes that a printed object has equal or superior strength of material properties to cast/forged stock after cutting.
 
2013-07-19 10:39:05 AM
I said get on the plane

mostlymargaret.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-07-19 10:39:33 AM

meanmutton: Calling out of other Farkers (in headlines): As odd as this may sound, not everyone wants attention on Fark. Specifically mentioning a fellow Farker in a headline or post (where the named Farker isn't participating) generates attention to a Farker who didn't intend it. This is not welcome on this site. If you have something to say to a particular Farker (and it isn't abusive), check their profile for an email address and go directly to the source. Comments and headlines about specific Farkers will likely be deleted, as not everyone needs or wants to see their name in bright lights, and most often, the attention is undesired.


The mods will remove it if they want to. Click the little "report post" button at the bottom.

The Mods will also allow a FARKer to be mentioned by name if they have become a Meme on the website for certain topics, or are considered "experts" in their field. This is why a certain Jewish Farker will be mentioned in a thread on Israel, why a certain Furry Nuclear technician will get mentioned in Nuke threads, etc.
 
2013-07-19 10:40:30 AM

rubi_con_man: b2theory: If I recall correctly, those compressor blades are made of single crystal nickle super alloys. The thought of printing that is insane.

wait wait wait ... you're saying that those huge blades that we all can see when we look into the front of a jet engine - those things are each one huge crystal? That's insane. How do they even MAKE those?


Here you go. This is one method of creating them. In Bangor we have another plant that does it a different, but similar way.

Note: at 2:40, they're using what's called a Coordinate Measuring Machine. That little bead is attached to one of the most advanced 3D analyzers on the planet. The one I saw was a quarter million and had a precision of ±0.000002 in. Yes, it was necessary.
 
2013-07-19 10:46:21 AM
rubi_con_man

... you're saying that those huge blades that we all can see when we look into the front of a jet engine - those things are each one huge crystal?

Assuming you are referring to a commercial airliner, those are the fan blades. The compressor is behind them and of somewhat smaller diameter.
 
2013-07-19 10:47:33 AM

meanmutton: Seems like some people here need to reread the posting rules:

http://www.fark.com/farq/posting/#What_are_the_posting_rules.3F


Calling out of other Farkers (in headlines): As odd as this may sound, not everyone wants attention on Fark. Specifically mentioning a fellow Farker in a headline or post (where the named Farker isn't participating) generates attention to a Farker who didn't intend it. This is not welcome on this site. If you have something to say to a particular Farker (and it isn't abusive), check their profile for an email address and go directly to the source. Comments and headlines about specific Farkers will likely be deleted, as not everyone needs or wants to see their name in bright lights, and most often, the attention is undesired.


Cry me a river.
 
2013-07-19 10:52:35 AM

Larva Lump: rubi_con_man

... you're saying that those huge blades that we all can see when we look into the front of a jet engine - those things are each one huge crystal?

Assuming you are referring to a commercial airliner, those are the fan blades. The compressor is behind them and of somewhat smaller diameter.


Some of the compressor blades which are single crystal are as large as 18 inches. Still quite large, but yeah, not as huge as those fan blades.
 
2013-07-19 10:58:06 AM
Even if it isn't against posting rules and even if it is pretty freaking pathetic to need protection from the mods here because you're (in)famous for acting like a jackass about a particular subject, why try to get it to appear?

The thread will be much more constructive (aka completely unlike every other thread) without it here, why would you even jokingly ask for its presence? The act is not amusing, it's just another person wrong on the Internet. Ignore it and move on, or derive whatever sad pleasure you get from correcting people on Fark, but don't try to summon it to threads it hasn't shiat in yet.

Because right now any space thread or 3d printing thread consists of about half the people asking for it to appear. And that's worse then it being here and dropping a turd that's easily ignored.
 
2013-07-19 11:03:57 AM

meanmutton: Seems like some people here need to reread the posting rules:

http://www.fark.com/farq/posting/#What_are_the_posting_rules.3F


Calling out of other Farkers (in headlines): As odd as this may sound, not everyone wants attention on Fark. Specifically mentioning a fellow Farker in a headline or post (where the named Farker isn't participating) generates attention to a Farker who didn't intend it. This is not welcome on this site. If you have something to say to a particular Farker (and it isn't abusive), check their profile for an email address and go directly to the source. Comments and headlines about specific Farkers will likely be deleted, as not everyone needs or wants to see their name in bright lights, and most often, the attention is undesired.


Id like to specifically mention that Quantum Apostrophe is a farking douche bag, and deserves any attention he gets.
 
2013-07-19 11:07:02 AM
Some people have ink jet printers, some people just have get printers.
 
2013-07-19 11:07:49 AM
jet printers...

/dammit
 
2013-07-19 11:09:57 AM
ajgeek

When it comes to precision, 3D printing doesn't have it, yet.

That said, 3D printing could be used in a meaningful way today by making a rough part and then taking it to a CNC mill for final dimensions*. The material savings alone would be in the tens of billions a year.

/ * This assumes that a printed object has equal or superior strength of material properties to cast/forged stock after cutting.


Actually, a 3D-printed pattern for a mold to be used with casting or powdered-metal processes would be quite handy. It's doubtful a machine that can directly squirt alloys is in the works yet. (Please, no one point to plasma deposition as an example of "squirting alloys" as it is not the same.) Finish machining is usually required with most cast/forged/sintered PM parts, anyway, unless they're for non-precision applications.
 
2013-07-19 11:14:16 AM
TFA: "Even NASA is getting in on the 3D printing act."

C'mon guys.  With a line like this, Space Bevets will be in this thread, whether you've summoned him or not.
 
2013-07-19 11:20:07 AM

b2theory: NO! We will never 3D print a jet engine or any meaningful part of it. I say this knowing that it is short if impossible to predict where technology will go. I am positive it won't go there.

If I recall correctly, those compressor blades are made of single crystal nickle super alloys. The thought of printing that is insane.


3D printing will come into play for bespoke components and for complicated single piece components that need internal empty spaces. Conformal cooling being the buzzword on the latter.

Though direct metal laser sintering is damn cool and I really want to play around with one of those printers.
 
2013-07-19 11:22:26 AM
...and largest.
 
2013-07-19 11:22:42 AM

meanmutton: Seems like some people here need to reread the posting rules:

http://www.fark.com/farq/posting/#What_are_the_posting_rules.3F


Calling out of other Farkers (in headlines): As odd as this may sound, not everyone wants attention on Fark. Specifically mentioning a fellow Farker in a headline or post (where the named Farker isn't participating) generates attention to a Farker who didn't intend it. This is not welcome on this site. If you have something to say to a particular Farker (and it isn't abusive), check their profile for an email address and go directly to the source. Comments and headlines about specific Farkers will likely be deleted, as not everyone needs or wants to see their name in bright lights, and most often, the attention is undesired.


*psst*

Ya got a little brown smudge on your nose there
 
2013-07-19 11:29:58 AM
I'm looking into getting a 3D printer.  I work with a lot of 3D CAD Software (CATIA, Solidworks, Autodesk) and I would like to do something productive with that skill.  I would like to get one of these, and get the Kinect SDK 1.7 (Fusion) that allows for 3D scanning (I have the Kinect already, gathering dust, might as well use it for something).

Ultimately, I would like to get into making molds for my wife (she is an amateur silver smith) but of course I could find other applications for it.

I just need to build my workshop first so I have room for all this.
 
2013-07-19 11:45:41 AM
Very cool.  I'm looking forward to what fabrication facilities will look like in 10 or 20 years if this technology continues to be refined.  Will it drop below casting in cost?  What materials will become feasible, etc.  If/when we start printing aluminum and steel at the same strength as casting at equivalent cost, this will take off.
 
2013-07-19 11:55:05 AM

Robo Beat: C'mon guys.  With a line like this, Space Bevets will be in this thread, whether you've summoned him or not.


Yeah...seems to be designed specifically to troll him.  Maybe NASA has a farker on staff.
 
2013-07-19 11:57:38 AM

rubi_con_man: b2theory: If I recall correctly, those compressor blades are made of single crystal nickle super alloys. The thought of printing that is insane.

wait wait wait ... you're saying that those huge blades that we all can see when we look into the front of a jet engine - those things are each one huge crystal? That's insane. How do they even MAKE those?


As others have said, there are typically three blade stages in a commercial turbine engine, 1. fan, which provides bypass thrust. 2. compressor (multi-stage). 3. combustion/turbine.  Then exhaust, but there are no blades there.  Usually only the stuff in the combustion section like turbine blades, combustion deflectors, and vanes, if any, are single crystal due to the high heat.  I think some of the later compression stages may be single crystal, but I doubt it.  So the blades you see on the front are almost certainly NOT single crystal.  Neat technology though.

Source: Worked in a casting house that made turbine blades
 
2013-07-19 12:04:08 PM
Khellendros: I'm looking forward to what fabrication facilities will look like in 10 or 20 years if this technology continues to be refined.

You misspelled "as"... :-)

/wondering "if" is like wondering "if" computer performance will continue to improve
 
2013-07-19 12:05:06 PM
oh, and how single crystal blades are  grown is very interesting.  I can't pretend to understand it perfect as I'm not a materials guy, but when they cast the blades in the investment casting (lost wax) process, at the bottom of the mold a "seed" or "starter" is inserted: this seed is already in single crystal orientation, so when the molten alloy is poured into the mold, it melts back the starter a certain amount, leaving a semi-molten region of seed alloy somewhere between a liquid and a solid.  Once the alloy starts to cool, the original crystal structure of the seed alloy propagates through the alloy and the crystal structure grows out of the seed structure and cools.  Cool stuff.
 
2013-07-19 12:06:51 PM
"This is a 3D printed model of a jet engine,"


FTFY.
 
2013-07-19 12:08:38 PM
Oh, brave new world, where planes will crash due to low toner levels.

/yes, I know it doesn't work that way.
 
2013-07-19 12:21:18 PM

Stone Meadow: Khellendros: I'm looking forward to what fabrication facilities will look like in 10 or 20 years if this technology continues to be refined.

You misspelled "as"... :-)

/wondering "if" is like wondering "if" computer performance will continue to improve


I generally meant "refined" to be a discussion of what plateaus it will reach and "beat", not that there's a chance the technology will just stop or not be improved.  Sorry for the misstatement.
 
2013-07-19 12:21:33 PM

Valiente: Oh, brave new world, where planes will crash due to low toner levels.

/yes, I know it doesn't work that way.


Everybody knows that they are more likely to crash due to PC LOAD LETTER!
 
2013-07-19 12:31:38 PM

Khellendros: Very cool.  I'm looking forward to what fabrication facilities will look like in 10 or 20 years if this technology continues to be refined.  Will it drop below casting in cost?  What materials will become feasible, etc.  If/when we start printing aluminum and steel at the same strength as casting at equivalent cost, this will take off.


It never will, because to do deposition printing requires the material be powdered at a very fine very consistent level.  That makes the raw material more expensive than casting ever will be, even for the exact same metal.  It's great for prototypes, one-off components and materials that require complex internal channels that cannot be cast in place.

On the other hand, it's perfect for my new business making bespoke titanium dildos, butt plugs and cock rings because people will pay stupid money for that stuff!
 
2013-07-19 12:35:18 PM

Mr. Eugenides: cock rings


What kind of farking idiot would have a metal cock ring?
 
2013-07-19 12:35:53 PM

meanmutton: As odd as this may sound, not everyone wants attention on Fark.


Pfffft. everyone on Fark is an attention whore.

/especially me
//corollary: everyone on the internet is an attention whore
///especially you
 
2013-07-19 12:44:39 PM

Khellendros: Stone Meadow: Khellendros: I'm looking forward to what fabrication facilities will look like in 10 or 20 years if this technology continues to be refined.

You misspelled "as"... :-)

/wondering "if" is like wondering "if" computer performance will continue to improve

I generally meant "refined" to be a discussion of what plateaus it will reach and "beat", not that there's a chance the technology will just stop or not be improved.  Sorry for the misstatement.


I apologize if my comment came off as dickish. I was just riffing on the whole, '3d machines will never make anything but cheap junk' ethos.
 
2013-07-19 12:47:22 PM
So it's a nonfuctional model

wonder if at this point it could have been designed to be functional, they already make jet engines for RC planes, the smallest i found was 8 " long

it might have to be printed in parts, but i wonder if it would work
 
2013-07-19 01:03:36 PM

b2theory: NO! We will never 3D print a jet engine or any meaningful part of it. I say this knowing that it is short if impossible to predict where technology will go. I am positive it won't go there.

If I recall correctly, those compressor blades are made of single crystal nickle super alloys. The thought of printing that is insane.


There already are 3d printers that will print in nickel superalloys and other crazy stuff. Inconel, Cobalt superalloys etc.

Check out  http://www.eos.info/industries_markets/aerospace/engines, they make machines to print directly in metal with "reasonable" precision.

Want some superalloy compressor blades with internal cooling channels that can be made fully functional? It is possible.

Even if the tolerances are not anywhere near what can be done traditionally, the huge amount of flexibility allowed can often times be used to work around traditional limitations.
 
2013-07-19 01:11:41 PM

loonatic112358: So it's a nonfuctional model

wonder if at this point it could have been designed to be functional, they already make jet engines for RC planes, the smallest i found was 8 " long

it might have to be printed in parts, but i wonder if it would work


I don't know that they can make a functioning 1.5" long gas turbine engine, but NASA is planning to reduce the F-1B rocket engine from 5,600 parts to just 40 by literally 3d printing subcomponents that will be assembled into the finished engine. It is projected to make 1.8 million pounds of thrust at lift-off. I wonder how QA will move the goalposts then?
 
2013-07-19 01:21:16 PM

ajgeek: rubi_con_man: b2theory: If I recall correctly, those compressor blades are made of single crystal nickle super alloys. The thought of printing that is insane.

wait wait wait ... you're saying that those huge blades that we all can see when we look into the front of a jet engine - those things are each one huge crystal? That's insane. How do they even MAKE those?

Here you go. This is one method of creating them. In Bangor we have another plant that does it a different, but similar way.

Note: at 2:40, they're using what's called a Coordinate Measuring Machine. That little bead is attached to one of the most advanced 3D analyzers on the planet. The one I saw was a quarter million and had a precision of ±0.000002 in. Yes, it was necessary.


That cfm shait is old as dirt. The new hotness is the ge-90, genx with carbon fiber blades. Some people think graphene could replace carbon fiber, with some evidence to back them up. One of the best ways to make graphene is to shoot a graphene oxide solution with a laser, which would lend itself to 3d printing like this. I realize I'm going out on a limb here.
 
2013-07-19 01:29:30 PM
And yeah those are just then fan blades, later stages still have to be super metal.
 
2013-07-19 01:33:56 PM

Stone Meadow: I wonder how QA will move the goalposts then?


Space AND 3d-Printing?

The thread will be covered in Jizz.
 
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