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(Daily Mail)   Old and busted: Being attacked by a wild animal while out for a stroll. New hotness: Being attacked by a herd of cows while out for a stroll   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 53
    More: Scary, St. Martin, midwife, public right of ways, public access, Shrewsbury  
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3520 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jul 2013 at 10:53 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-19 10:56:39 AM
That is a MOOOOOOVVVinnngg story
 
2013-07-19 10:56:42 AM
According to the Daily Mail yesterday, the cow is the most dangerous animal in the British Isles.
 
2013-07-19 10:57:03 AM
So, it begins...
 
2013-07-19 10:57:33 AM
Well they did tell us yesterday that cows are a 4 out of 5 on the british dangerous animals scale.  So they must utterly frightening because apparently the cud murder you.
 
2013-07-19 10:58:56 AM
oh it happens.  nearly happened to me.  scary thing.

one minute they are across the field, quiet and innocent looking.  next thing you know, they are coming right at you, walking with a very determined look in their eyes.  and they just wont stop!

/they thought I had the food, is why
 
2013-07-19 10:59:33 AM
www.d2tomb.com
 
2013-07-19 11:01:50 AM
wizbangpop.com

The worm has turned.
 
2013-07-19 11:03:20 AM

skinbubble: [www.d2tomb.com image 800x600]


moo, moo moo, moo, moo, moomoomoo, moo, MOOOOO, moo
 
2013-07-19 11:03:40 AM
Out hiking once had to cross through some pasture. One particular bovine refused to let me pass, literally would be minding her own business, but when catching sight of me, would cross in front of my path and stare me down. I decide to back track and take a long way, when she sighted me again, she charged. I had to run for my life from a defensive momma.

Cowstorybro
////yeah
 
2013-07-19 11:03:51 AM
Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra. Emma Smith it St. Martin on the Lizard.
 
2013-07-19 11:05:15 AM
Cattle running at you is not a fun thing to happen.

Best thing to do is turn and face them, yell, wave your arms and make a lot of noise.  You won't out run them.

Fortunately all the holsteins, angus, hereford and belties I've worked with spook when threatened, except the bulls, but I still like the security of carrying a nice hard maple cane.

On the dairy farm I worked at, all the holsteins are separated from the calf pretty early on.
 
2013-07-19 11:07:39 AM
South Park did it.
 
2013-07-19 11:07:41 AM
recollectionbooks.com

At least it wasn't cows with guns
 
2013-07-19 11:09:31 AM
She has angered the Cow God, for it is clearly a sign of Bovine Intervention.

/sorry
 
2013-07-19 11:09:50 AM
A Briton while out for a walk,
encountered some random livestock
Despite being bovine,
they acted malign,
and udderly left her in shock.
 
2013-07-19 11:10:30 AM
Stupid cow!
 
2013-07-19 11:10:50 AM
any word on the dog?
 
2013-07-19 11:12:59 AM

Mose: Cattle running at you is not a fun thing to happen.

Best thing to do is turn and face them, yell, wave your arms and make a lot of noise.  You won't out run them.

Fortunately all the holsteins, angus, hereford and belties I've worked with spook when threatened, except the bulls, but I still like the security of carrying a nice hard maple cane.

On the dairy farm I worked at, all the holsteins are separated from the calf pretty early on.


seconded.  I grew up on a farm where we raised 200-300 head of beef cattle each year. Usually hereford or angus.

Holsteins are mean biatches.  Seriously mean, out to get you for no real reason.


 One of my jobs was to bed the barn.  It's scary when you don't pay attention to what you're doing and realize you've been blocked in by a solid wall of a few hundred 700-1000 lb bodies slowly crushing in because they think you have hay, not straw.
 
2013-07-19 11:15:31 AM
//Maybe Cool Cow Story

I visited a few friends from a small farming community back in my college years. After too many beers, a few of my friends decided to harass the neighbor's cows in the night just to see what they would do. The cows got ticked off, turned and charged as a group of about two dozen. The kids jumped back over the outer fence near the road, but about 5 of the cows someone managed to hit the bar on the gate hard enough to knock it open (or one of the drunk kids left it open) and charged into the road. 3 Teenagers running down the one lane road with cows chasing after them as the sun rose in the background is probably one of the more interesting memories I have of my college years.

//Okay, maybe not such an interesting cow story
 
2013-07-19 11:16:05 AM
"The law should be changed to keep cattle with calves out of fields with public access and require signs to warn of the danger"

How bout you let the landowner decided whether they want publc access to thier land instead of the counicls. Signs? Look out across the field, are there cattle? If yes, don't go in. Especially don't go in with a predator.
 
2013-07-19 11:20:07 AM
i1136.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-19 11:20:25 AM
static.comicvine.com
 
2013-07-19 11:22:42 AM
We raised cattle on our farm the whole time I was growing up. Never saw that kind of behavior from any of them, even the bulls. Sure, they'd act concerned if there were newborn calves around, and if a dog was present they'd all get upset and chase it off, but they were never violent towards humans at all. The worst they'd act was if I was late in feeding them and they would start pushing around trying to get to the hay. That was more clumsiness than anything though; a 1000 pound cow doesn't exactly notice when they bump up against a 120 pound teenager. The woman's dog is probably what set off the cows, though.

/cows don't like dogs
 
2013-07-19 11:29:16 AM
So many questions... like why are there cattle running around in an open field with no fencing... wtf are these passage ways... who's cows where those anyways.....
 
2013-07-19 11:30:28 AM
What a cow might look like:

www.gofashiontrend.com
 
2013-07-19 11:34:54 AM
She may never work again. Sounds like she's trying to milk it.
 
2013-07-19 11:35:09 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-07-19 11:35:57 AM
Cows kill more people than sharks, lightning strikes or snake bites each year in the US.

http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/stories/11-animals-more-lik el y-to-kill-you-than-sharks
 
2013-07-19 11:40:24 AM

FabulousFreep: Cows kill more people than sharks, lightning strikes or snake bites each year in the US.


Which is why I am working on a screenplay for "Electric Viper Shark-cow". Coming soon to the Syfy channel.
 
2013-07-19 11:42:49 AM

Maul555: So many questions... like why are there cattle running around in an open field with no fencing... wtf are these passage ways... who's cows where those anyways.....


Why was this broad not paying attention to the herd of really pissed off cows coming at her?  I bet she was texting.
 
2013-07-19 11:49:40 AM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-07-19 11:52:53 AM
Cow tipping stroll maybe?
 
2013-07-19 11:55:21 AM
moo means moo
 
2013-07-19 12:11:16 PM

Maul555: So many questions... like why are there cattle running around in an open field with no fencing... wtf are these passage ways... who's cows where those anyways.....


They would belong to a farmer who owned or leased the land they were grazing on.  They are in the open field because that is where cows live.  They eat grass.  There was indeed fencing; TFA has photos of the electric fence that the woman crawled under to escape from the cows.  The passageways are public rights of way through private land, which is common in Great Britain.

/tmyk
 
2013-07-19 12:14:15 PM
It's the ninja cows you gotta watch out for.
 
2013-07-19 12:14:20 PM
A friend and I were once chased out of a field while mushroom picking.  I tore through some brush and dove through a barbed wire fence.  The cows chased us the length of the fence stomping and mooing while a little kid on the other side of the canal yelled "Look the cows trying to kill those guys!"  We went back to class empty handed.

/csb
 
2013-07-19 12:14:49 PM

skinbubble: [www.d2tomb.com image 800x600]


Came for the cow level, left to eat my burger.

/moooo, mooo, MOOOO, moo.
 
2013-07-19 12:16:08 PM
Gah, people who live where there are cattle have the responsibility to understand that cattle are NOT like in cartoons. Cattle are very large, very strong, and very cantankerous. A bull could overturn a pickup truck if he had a mind to do it--and some of them do, from time to time. Cows are not much more docile. The citified have no business living in the country until they learn country ways. After all, if some yokel wants to move to the city, it behooves him to learn basics like "how to cross a street that actually has cars on it".
 
2013-07-19 12:23:41 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-07-19 12:27:08 PM
Meh, cows are amateurs when compared to hippos.
 
2013-07-19 01:00:30 PM

Merry Sunshine: Maul555: So many questions... like why are there cattle running around in an open field with no fencing... wtf are these passage ways... who's cows where those anyways.....

They would belong to a farmer who owned or leased the land they were grazing on.  They are in the open field because that is where cows live.  They eat grass.  There was indeed fencing; TFA has photos of the electric fence that the woman crawled under to escape from the cows.  The passageways are public rights of way through private land, which is common in Great Britain.

/tmyk


The public rights  o way are part of the reason my family stopped letting snowmobilers through our land (the other was property damage). Once a route through your property becomes common custom, people can sue you for trying to end it.  Its one of  the downsides of living in a country with english common law
 
2013-07-19 01:06:41 PM

amishkarl: How bout you let the landowner decided whether they want publc access to thier land instead of the counicls.


Public access to the countryside is a hard fought for right, that enjoys extremely strong and vocal support, in the UK but,
unless they have been in use unchallenged for more than twenty years, landowners can challenge the opening or existence of any footpath, bridleway or restricted byway and frequently do so successfully where there are concerns over livestock safety.

That being said, going into a field full of cows with a dog is spectacularly ill-advised.
 
2013-07-19 01:18:41 PM
I grew up around cows. They are dumb, dirty, oblivious and mean.  Some people quit eating meat because they had a favorite animal as a pet. I eat beef not because I like it all that much, but because I know a cow had to die to give it up. Fack off cows.
 
2013-07-19 01:19:41 PM

FarkinNortherner: Public access to the countryside is a hard fought for right, that enjoys extremely strong and vocal support, in the UK but,
unless they have been in use unchallenged for more than twenty years, landowners can challenge the opening or existence of any footpath, bridleway or restricted byway and frequently do so successfully where there are concerns over livestock safety.


Yeah, I know. But that dopey bint was wanting catle banned from publicly accessible land. That's putting a mighty big imposition on farmers when huge portions of the countryside are publicly accessable, whether the landowner wants it to be or not.
 
2013-07-19 01:33:51 PM

Satan's Bunny Slippers: Mose: Cattle running at you is not a fun thing to happen.

Best thing to do is turn and face them, yell, wave your arms and make a lot of noise.  You won't out run them.

Fortunately all the holsteins, angus, hereford and belties I've worked with spook when threatened, except the bulls, but I still like the security of carrying a nice hard maple cane.

On the dairy farm I worked at, all the holsteins are separated from the calf pretty early on.

seconded.  I grew up on a farm where we raised 200-300 head of beef cattle each year. Usually hereford or angus.

Holsteins are mean biatches.  Seriously mean, out to get you for no real reason.


 One of my jobs was to bed the barn.  It's scary when you don't pay attention to what you're doing and realize you've been blocked in by a solid wall of a few hundred 700-1000 lb bodies slowly crushing in because they think you have hay, not straw.


Holsteins being milked, or even the dry cows, I never had too much problem with.  Once they get old and in a routine, they were fine.  They knew what an electric fence was and to stay away from it.

The heifer pasture, on the other hand, was occasionally an unmitigated disaster.  I saw them get spooked one day and about 30 heifers anywhere from 200 to 800 lbs go head long right through a strand of electric wire and 5 strands of barbed wire behind that, fence posts about 10 feet apart.  The ones up front were a mess, all cut up.  And trying to herd heifers is a bit like herding cats.

Holstein bulls are mean fockers.  When I was a kid, they'd keep one around when artificial insemination was more expensive and less reliable.  Always had a ring in the nose and that was the only way you lead it anywhere.  Often it was tied to a tractor hitch.  Now a days, the only bulls on dairy farms are when you strike out and get one as a calf.  Those "go away" pretty quickly though.

Brown swiss and jersey on the other hand, much nicer to deal with.  I had a pet brown swiss for a while, although I suspect that she ended up in the freezer at some point even though my dad still won't tell me for sure.
 
2013-07-19 01:39:53 PM
Mose:

Brown swiss and jersey on the other hand, much nicer to deal with.  I had a pet brown swiss for a ...

yeah, we never had the steers long enough to get old, and only had the cows for a few years till we stopped anything to do with milking.  Jerseys were always my favorite.  Never too big, sweet natured for the most part, easy to calf and to get to move around.

Most bulls are bastards.  The one we had would push against the wooden fence (well, HIS side of the fence was 4X4s mounted on old railroad ties buried half in the ground), grinding his head in and slowly scraping his hooves in the dirt, just staring at you.  To this day those two boards are bowed out and nothing grows there.
 
2013-07-19 01:52:34 PM
I was attacked by a herd of wild cows at a bar in Indiana.

/or was it cougars?
 
2013-07-19 01:55:25 PM

whatshisname: I was attacked by a herd of wild cows at a bar in Indiana.

/or was it cougars?


It's Indiana.  They look the same.


bah dah *BOOM* tissssh
 
2013-07-19 02:37:06 PM

Mose: Holsteins being milked, or even the dry cows, I never had too much problem with. Once they get old and in a routine, they were fine. They knew what an electric fence was and to stay away from it.

The heifer pasture, on the other hand, was occasionally an unmitigated disaster. I saw them get spooked one day and about 30 heifers anywhere from 200 to 800 lbs go head long right through a strand of electric wire and 5 strands of barbed wire behind that, fence posts about 10 feet apart. The ones up front were a mess, all cut up. And trying to herd heifers is a bit like herding cats.

Holstein bulls are mean fockers. When I was a kid, they'd keep one around when artificial insemination was more expensive and less reliable. Always had a ring in the nose and that was the only way you lead it anywhere. Often it was tied to a tractor hitch. Now a days, the only bulls on dairy farms are when you strike out and get one as a calf. Those "go away" pretty quickly though.

Brown swiss and jersey on the other hand, much nicer to deal with. I had a pet brown swiss for a while, although I suspect that she ended up in the freezer at some point even though my dad still won't tell me for sure


If you tie them up as calves, they're much quieter as cows. I've found there' a noticeable difference between the calves raised in hutches or tied to a post and the ones raised in pens. 

Dairy bulls of all breeds tend to be nastier. (Jersey's have a reputation for being the nastiest). It comes down to the difference in rasing. Dairy bulls are raised by hand, and when they grow up they see humans as their rivals. Beef bulls grow up with the herd, so they see other cattle as their rivals.

My family started with holstiens and slowly switched to jerseys over about 10 years. The breeds have different tendencies. Jersey's tend to be much more stubborn - if they don't want to go they'll throw themselves down and pout, and there's nothing you can do but wait til she decides to get up again. They're also curiouser and more affectionate. If I go out in the pasture to check fence, they'll follow me around and lick at me the whole time
 
2013-07-19 02:45:22 PM

mbillips: According to the Daily Mail yesterday, the cow is the most dangerous animal in the British Isles.


Behold the cave of Caerbannog!
 
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