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(The Atlantic)   The pitch dropped   (theatlantic.com) divider line 40
    More: Cool, Trinity College, University of Queensland, human foot, Caught on Camera, lecture hall  
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4638 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Jul 2013 at 2:51 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-18 10:32:26 PM
So, not the long-runner in Australia, but a similar experiment based on it. OK.
 
2013-07-18 10:50:01 PM

BKITU: So, not the long-runner in Australia, but a similar experiment based on it. OK.


Yeah, bad subby.

It's like headlinging "President dead!" while TFA is along the lines of "The President of Ecuador...".
 
2013-07-18 10:55:08 PM
Dang, I missed it.  Can we start over?
 
2013-07-19 12:09:26 AM
reminds me of glass- it's an amorphous solid that behaves like a slow-moving liquid over long periods of time
 
2013-07-19 12:52:27 AM

Bung_Howdy: reminds me of glass- it's an amorphous solid that behaves like a slow-moving liquid over long periods of time


Please tell me you're trolling, because you are DEAD F*CKING WRONG.

It does not flow like pitch, even on long timescales. It is an amorphous solid, that much you are correct about.

Here is a decent source:

http://www.glassnotes.com/WindowPanes.html

To wit:

I was made aware of the fallacy of the glass flows myth many years ago by the late great glass chemist, Nick Labino. Nick offered this simple analogy, "...if the windows found in early Colonial American homes were thicker at the bottom than the top because of "flow" then the glass found in Egyptian Tombs should be a puddle." Wow, that was a shocker. And there's this one from Wikipedia, "If glass flows at a rate that allows changes to be seen with the naked eye after centuries, then the effect should be noticeable in antique telescopes. Any slight deformation in the antique telescopic lenses would lead to a dramatic decrease in optical performance, a phenomenon that is not observed". I just love real world examples! For those of you that are still skeptical I cite research that tells us that although 1/2 of the glass in old stained glass windows is thicker at the bottom, take three guesses where the other half are thicker and the first two guesses don't count. You got it, sides and top.
 
2013-07-19 12:53:04 AM
Thank God!  Finally I can get some sleep.
 
2013-07-19 01:25:28 AM
Brown 25

/At Uranus, things come out a little differently
 
2013-07-19 02:10:37 AM

Sid_6.7: Please tell me you're trolling, because you are DEAD F*CKING WRONG.


Whoa dude... too much coffee?  You're going to blow your O-ring.
Yes, he's wrong, but the "glass flows over time" thing is a pretty common misconception.  No reason to freak out.
 
2013-07-19 03:00:53 AM

Z-clipped: No reason to freak out.


Don't take this from him, he has nothing else.
 
2013-07-19 03:06:13 AM
www.nuvo.net

Pitches love droppin'
 
2013-07-19 03:22:25 AM
Wow, that stuff moves slower than molasses going uphill on a cold winter's morning.
 
2013-07-19 05:07:16 AM
Had to go pee.  Anything happen with that pitch-thingee thing?
 
2013-07-19 05:48:31 AM
Yah, totally teevoed that while I was catching up with last months highlight reel from The Paintdrying Channel.
 
2013-07-19 05:56:38 AM

Ishkur: Wow, that stuff moves slower than molasses going uphill on a cold winter's morning.


Back in my day we used to chase molasses uphill in the winter, both ways in fact.  If you didn't catch it Dad would beat you with a moldy banana.
 
2013-07-19 06:36:55 AM
I've got 99 problems but a pitch ain't one.

Seriously, I wonder if pitch is the most viscous material that will flow, or whether they can do the experiment with an even slower liquid.
 
2013-07-19 06:37:16 AM
What you're saying is that after the ball fell off the pitch went higher?
 
2013-07-19 06:46:42 AM
www.claremontshows.com

Appreciates a slow pitch.
 
2013-07-19 07:37:06 AM
As the great chemist, Ansel Adams, told his lab assistant: "Don't glorify the insignificant."
 
2013-07-19 08:03:08 AM
"looks like poo"
 
2013-07-19 08:07:58 AM
That's what happened to my voice when I turned 15.
 
2013-07-19 08:30:33 AM
ftfa: The work (the experimenter who set it up has been, alas, lost to history) examined this phenomenon in a lab setting. And it wasn't the first to do this: the pitch-and-jar setup was a replication of a similar experiment being conducted at the University of Queensland in Australia -- one that, to this day, remains the longest-running laboratory experiment in the world. Both experiments were simple and, in that, wonderfully elegant: their primary component, aside from the pitch and the jar, was time.

I don't know shiat about this slow moving stuff that "looks like poo," but this writing is horrendous.
 
2013-07-19 08:34:00 AM

Sid_6.7: Bung_Howdy: reminds me of glass- it's an amorphous solid that behaves like a slow-moving liquid over long periods of time

Please tell me you're trolling, because you are DEAD F*CKING WRONG.

It does not flow like pitch, even on long timescales. It is an amorphous solid, that much you are correct about.

Here is a decent source:

http://www.glassnotes.com/WindowPanes.html

To wit:

I was made aware of the fallacy of the glass flows myth many years ago by the late great glass chemist, Nick Labino. Nick offered this simple analogy, "...if the windows found in early Colonial American homes were thicker at the bottom than the top because of "flow" then the glass found in Egyptian Tombs should be a puddle." Wow, that was a shocker. And there's this one from Wikipedia, "If glass flows at a rate that allows changes to be seen with the naked eye after centuries, then the effect should be noticeable in antique telescopes. Any slight deformation in the antique telescopic lenses would lead to a dramatic decrease in optical performance, a phenomenon that is not observed". I just love real world examples! For those of you that are still skeptical I cite research that tells us that although 1/2 of the glass in old stained glass windows is thicker at the bottom, take three guesses where the other half are thicker and the first two guesses don't count. You got it, sides and top.


And here's another. They actually have a different measure of viscosity.
http://www.cmog.org/article/does-glass-flow

FTL:
Molasses has a rating of .01 poises.
Brie has a rating of 500,000 poises.
Drumroll please.
Glass has a poise of roughly 10 to the 20th power. And that is an estimate because it essentially pegs the scale. To compare, metallic lead has a RT poise rating of 10 to the 11th power.
 
2013-07-19 08:47:31 AM

mephox: Sid_6.7: Bung_Howdy: reminds me of glass- it's an amorphous solid that behaves like a slow-moving liquid over long periods of time

Please tell me you're trolling, because you are DEAD F*CKING WRONG.

It does not flow like pitch, even on long timescales. It is an amorphous solid, that much you are correct about.

Here is a decent source:

http://www.glassnotes.com/WindowPanes.html

To wit:

I was made aware of the fallacy of the glass flows myth many years ago by the late great glass chemist, Nick Labino. Nick offered this simple analogy, "...if the windows found in early Colonial American homes were thicker at the bottom than the top because of "flow" then the glass found in Egyptian Tombs should be a puddle." Wow, that was a shocker. And there's this one from Wikipedia, "If glass flows at a rate that allows changes to be seen with the naked eye after centuries, then the effect should be noticeable in antique telescopes. Any slight deformation in the antique telescopic lenses would lead to a dramatic decrease in optical performance, a phenomenon that is not observed". I just love real world examples! For those of you that are still skeptical I cite research that tells us that although 1/2 of the glass in old stained glass windows is thicker at the bottom, take three guesses where the other half are thicker and the first two guesses don't count. You got it, sides and top.

And here's another. They actually have a different measure of viscosity.
http://www.cmog.org/article/does-glass-flow

FTL:
Molasses has a rating of .01 poises.
Brie has a rating of 500,000 poises.
Drumroll please.
Glass has a poise of roughly 10 to the 20th power. And that is an estimate because it essentially pegs the scale. To compare, metallic lead has a RT poise rating of 10 to the 11th power.


Eppur si muove.
 
2013-07-19 08:56:34 AM
It drops so slowly it hasn't happened in 69 years?  Submitter missed the perfect opportunity for a  img1.fark.net tag.
 
2013-07-19 09:21:19 AM
 
2013-07-19 09:21:57 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Brown 25

/At Uranus, things come out a little differently



Goddammitsomuch.
 
2013-07-19 09:52:45 AM

Z-clipped: pretty common misconception


Due to a failure to nip that sh*t in the bud, and then you're stuck having to listen for years to people make idiot claims.
 
2013-07-19 09:57:40 AM
FTFA: "And it wasn't the first to do this: the pitch-and-jar setup was a replication of a similar experiment being conducted at the University of Queensland in Australia -- one that, to this day, remains the longest-running laboratory experiment in the world."

Wrong! That title goes to the Beverly Clock in the foyer of the Physics Department at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, which has run without human winding since 1864. The clock is 'self-winding', using an atmospheric bellows that operates off changes in room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

The Beverly has stopped of its own accord several times during times of extended low temperature variation (it needs a 6 F degree per day swing to stay wound), plus it was stopped by its curator so the clock could be moved to its present location (to give it more temperature variation). It stopped another time when a link failed in the hand-made Huygens chain after a 90-year run. (A new chain was made which is expected to last hundreds of years more.) In all cases the clock wound itself back up and started running again as soon as its pendulum was given a nudge. The Beverly is well regulated, and is generally accurate to within a few minutes a year.

Jeff Bezos has funded the Clock of the Long Now, which is expected to run completely without human intervention for 10,000 years when it's completed, with an accuracy of 1 day over that time frame.

/amateur horologist
//building a Beverly replica
 
2013-07-19 10:05:33 AM
What about the beat?
 
2013-07-19 10:37:17 AM

mephox: Sid_6.7: Bung_Howdy: reminds me of glass- it's an amorphous solid that behaves like a slow-moving liquid over long periods of time

Please tell me you're trolling, because you are DEAD F*CKING WRONG.

It does not flow like pitch, even on long timescales. It is an amorphous solid, that much you are correct about.

Here is a decent source:

http://www.glassnotes.com/WindowPanes.html

To wit:

I was made aware of the fallacy of the glass flows myth many years ago by the late great glass chemist, Nick Labino. Nick offered this simple analogy, "...if the windows found in early Colonial American homes were thicker at the bottom than the top because of "flow" then the glass found in Egyptian Tombs should be a puddle." Wow, that was a shocker. And there's this one from Wikipedia, "If glass flows at a rate that allows changes to be seen with the naked eye after centuries, then the effect should be noticeable in antique telescopes. Any slight deformation in the antique telescopic lenses would lead to a dramatic decrease in optical performance, a phenomenon that is not observed". I just love real world examples! For those of you that are still skeptical I cite research that tells us that although 1/2 of the glass in old stained glass windows is thicker at the bottom, take three guesses where the other half are thicker and the first two guesses don't count. You got it, sides and top.

And here's another. They actually have a different measure of viscosity.
http://www.cmog.org/article/does-glass-flow

FTL:
Molasses has a rating of .01 poises.
Brie has a rating of 500,000 poises.
Drumroll please.
Glass has a poise of roughly 10 to the 20th power. And that is an estimate because it essentially pegs the scale. To compare, metallic lead has a RT poise rating of 10 to the 11th power.


Except that the whole article DOES state that glass flows, just not at any rate we can discern... By giving it a viscosity rating, and doing the calculations for how long it would take a piece of glass to become 1 angstrom thicker, it is indeed stating that the glass DOES flow downward, just extremely, super-duper slow....
 
2013-07-19 10:44:16 AM
One of the longest-standing continuing experiments in the history of the world...

...still can't get around to setting the appropriate height on the funnel's clamp stand in time.

Way to go, dipshiats. The pitch did not "drop". The pitch made contact with the material already in the beaker before detaching. FSM I swear everybody on this planet except for me is a total tard.
 
2013-07-19 10:46:58 AM

Stone Meadow: FTFA: "And it wasn't the first to do this: the pitch-and-jar setup was a replication of a similar experiment being conducted at the University of Queensland in Australia -- one that, to this day, remains the longest-running laboratory experiment in the world."

Wrong! That title goes to the Beverly Clock in the foyer of the Physics Department at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, which has run without human winding since 1864. The clock is 'self-winding', using an atmospheric bellows that operates off changes in room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

The Beverly has stopped of its own accord several times during times of extended low temperature variation (it needs a 6 F degree per day swing to stay wound), plus it was stopped by its curator so the clock could be moved to its present location (to give it more temperature variation). It stopped another time when a link failed in the hand-made Huygens chain after a 90-year run. (A new chain was made which is expected to last hundreds of years more.) In all cases the clock wound itself back up and started running again as soon as its pendulum was given a nudge. The Beverly is well regulated, and is generally accurate to within a few minutes a year.

Jeff Bezos has funded the Clock of the Long Now, which is expected to run completely without human intervention for 10,000 years when it's completed, with an accuracy of 1 day over that time frame.

/amateur horologist
//building a Beverly replica


I love clocks... Clocks and lights. Anything that is so straight up functional, yet can be made so artful. My wife hates it when I disappear into the lighting department at a store. Unfortunately, the best lighting department I can usually find is Ikea, and they only have 4 or 5 that I really like. Lucky for her, I haven't really found a good clock shop yet, or she'd never see me. My list of 'wants' is a Nixie Tube clock, an Art Deco 'Mystery Clock', and now thanks to a link in your link, a farking $12,000 Atmos clock... :-)
 
2013-07-19 10:47:21 AM

Stone Meadow: Jeff Bezos has funded the Clock of the Long Now, which is expected to run completely without human intervention for 10,000 years when it's completed, with an accuracy of 1 day over that time frame.


Neal Stephenson wrote "Anathem" based on the concept of that clock.  A lot of Stephenson fans dislike it because Platonism (or because Randall Munroe told them to) but it's one of my favorite novels.
 
2013-07-19 10:53:35 AM

Mikey1969: My list of 'wants' is a Nixie Tube clock, an Art Deco 'Mystery Clock', and now thanks to a link in your link, a farking

$12,000 Atmos clock... :-)

I too was enamored with Atmos clocks until I discovered their closed bellows needs recharging every 20 years or so (the working fluid leaks out through the metal). The Beverly and the Long Now clocks are open to the atmosphere, so will never* need recharging.

* -  never being a relative term
 
2013-07-19 10:54:14 AM

Hollie Maea: Stone Meadow: Jeff Bezos has funded the Clock of the Long Now, which is expected to run completely without human intervention for 10,000 years when it's completed, with an accuracy of 1 day over that time frame.

Neal Stephenson wrote "Anathem" based on the concept of that clock.  A lot of Stephenson fans dislike it because Platonism (or because Randall Munroe told them to) but it's one of my favorite novels.


Thanks, I'll check that out. :)
 
2013-07-19 11:01:44 AM

Stone Meadow: Thanks, I'll check that out. :)


Grind past the "invented words" (that's what tired out Randall)...there is a good glossary and after a chapter or so you don't notice it (and there is a method to his word choices).  Like most Stephenson books, it starts a bit slow.  But I pretty much read the second half in a single sitting.  And a lot of interesting stuff to think about.
 
2013-07-19 11:33:25 AM
oi40.tinypic.com
 
2013-07-19 02:35:47 PM
Looks like one of my hangover shiats.
 
2013-07-19 02:58:45 PM

Hollie Maea: Stone Meadow: Thanks, I'll check that out. :)

Grind past the "invented words" (that's what tired out Randall)...there is a good glossary and after a chapter or so you don't notice it (and there is a method to his word choices).  Like most Stephenson books, it starts a bit slow.  But I pretty much read the second half in a single sitting.  And a lot of interesting stuff to think about.


On hold at my local pubic library... :-)
 
2013-07-20 01:36:25 AM

RatMaster999: [www.nuvo.net image 850x565]

Pitches love droppin'


i.imgur.com

Better late than never.
 
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