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(BBC)   Since Fark has spent the last week mocking the UK for its 85 degree "heatwave", here are ten reasons why the country is so poorly equipped to deal with it   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 207
    More: Followup, Network Rail, building projects, energy consumption, GCSE, Mintel  
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14965 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jul 2013 at 2:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-18 04:55:57 PM
I don't like the heat.

I'm in NY, and it's what I call "Dallas hot" right now.
 
2013-07-18 04:56:32 PM

The Irresponsible Captain: I can't believe they have so few swimming pools. What, are they afraid of water? They live on a frekin' Island!


They fear tiny vikings might rape and pillage their homes. And Kelpies, too.
 
2013-07-18 04:58:01 PM
Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun.
 
2013-07-18 04:59:15 PM

Prevailing Wind: new_york_monty: cbauer357: new_york_monty: potterydove: bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.

I live in Michigan.  Where I live it averages just under 2 meters of snowfall a year.  I think I'd be ok in Hamilton or whatever Toronto suburb you live in.

Heck here in Garrett County, Maryland, we topped 20 feet in the winter of 2010-11 and regularly go over 10 feet. I'd love less than 2 meters in a winter--might be able to fire the snowplow driver who does my driveway and just use a damned shovel.

/Used to think Maryland didn't get serious snow
//Now knows that's just the downstate

snerk.... we get snow, it's either we get a truckload where the Gov shuts down the major roadways or we get enough to just make a freakin' sloppy mess OR we get the snow storm, then an ice storm, then more snow. I live on a cul-de-sac and we are the red headed step-children of Anne Arundel County and never get plowed out. If it's big time snow, they plow the secondary road and block us with a huge snow bank and there is no other exit available.

How did you make out in Sandy last year? We had something like 95% outages across Garrett with a foot+ of the heaviest snow I've ever seen. Had the power back at my house after a week, and we were the fortunate ones in the county (other than the county seat). I had friends without power for two weeks or so. I'm in a small private development, so our road-care is private, but even our guy couldn't get in for 2 days or so.

I will say, at least around here everyone has snow tires in the winter and most people know how to deal with it. I feel bad for the people who get snowed in who aren't provisioned for it. Around here, we pretty much expect it from Oct to Apr.


My folks live in Accident.  Ever since 2010, they've snowbirded the shiat out of there and just dealt with the inevitable damage to the house in the Spring.  The ...


Ah yes, Accident (one of my favorite name-origin stories for a town). I'm about twenty minutes or so from there. I would love to do the snowbird thing, unfortunately I work full time in the region, so that's a no-go for me. One day, I'll make this a summer house... until then... well I installed a generator after Sandy, so at least I can make it through the worst of it!

It really is a gorgeous area for about six months out of the years. But it will definitely try to kill you the other six months!
 
2013-07-18 04:59:22 PM

Tom_Slick: I remember watching a BBC series where a middle class family had to live one month traveling through time from the year 1970-2000, I was shocked at the different standards of living between the UK and the US over those time periods.  The 70s were really enlightening.


Did it resemble the British scenes in National Lampoon's European Vacation?
 
2013-07-18 05:00:29 PM

CoRrUpTeDbUdGiE: Brit, living near Manchester. Suffering. Major heat rash on the backs of both hands and arms, also everything from the knees down has swelled up in the heat.
I am in agony, I can't wear anything on my arms as it hurts. I also have to keep them both heavily moisturised because the blistering hurts like hell.
As for walking, sort of. I feel like I'm walking through thick mud. I can't put them up for too long. I'm drinking plenty of water.
I *HATE* warm weather.

If you in the US have done with the storms you've been experiencing, could you be so kind as to ship a few over, please?
I know I'm not keen on storms, but they're definitely prettier than the locals and endless blue sky. And I might actually stand a better chance of being able to move/not look like an accident victim.
Thanks in advance!


Sorry. It's been cool and rainy here in Dallas the past 3 days or so (apparently the result of a rare case where the blob of low pressure moved west instead of east), but it's going to warm up today and for the foreseeable future. Supposedly, it is 94F here now (which is pretty pleasant for July, but it's humid as fark because it's been raining). And it will only go up from there. 98 or so over the weekend.

As soon as the heat wrings the humidity out of the air and ground, it'll be normal around here (high 90s, no rain). So maybe you'll get your normal weather back.
 
2013-07-18 05:01:17 PM

Prevailing Wind: mmagdalene: Real reason: The British are so white you can see their veins and organs through their skin.

Lol.  London is about as ethnically diverse city as you are likely to find on planet earth.  The anglo's spend a great deal of time out of doors walking (or sadly, smoking) so they are less pale than you might think.

As for the heat, 85 doesn't sound hot unless you've ever been in the tube on a typical summer day and its still hotter than crotch.  I can't imagine what that hellhole must feel like right now.


Like Kolkata and twice as smelly.
 
2013-07-18 05:06:12 PM

CoRrUpTeDbUdGiE: Brit, living near Manchester. Suffering. Major heat rash on the backs of both hands and arms, also everything from the knees down has swelled up in the heat.
I am in agony, I can't wear anything on my arms as it hurts. I also have to keep them both heavily moisturised because the blistering hurts like hell.
As for walking, sort of. I feel like I'm walking through thick mud. I can't put them up for too long. I'm drinking plenty of water.
I *HATE* warm weather.

If you in the US have done with the storms you've been experiencing, could you be so kind as to ship a few over, please?
I know I'm not keen on storms, but they're definitely prettier than the locals and endless blue sky. And I might actually stand a better chance of being able to move/not look like an accident victim.
Thanks in advance!


Former blast furnace worker here...  If it's really heat rash (versus sunburn) and you want rid of it, put a piece of wood or your wallet between your teeth to bite down on and pour rubbing alcohol over the affected area.  Hurts like a sonofabiatch but the heat rash will be dried up and gone in a half hour or so.

It's the only thing I ever found completely effective.

It's also very good for cooling you down, pour the rubbing alcohol on your wrists.  Blood vessels are close to the skin there and the alcohol evaporates rapidly taking a lot of heat out of your system (to the point you can give yourself a chill).  Cold water works too, just not as quickly.
 
2013-07-18 05:06:35 PM

Gabrielmot: TheOmni: It's like when we make fun of the southern states for being pretty much completely shut down whenever they get about an inch of snow. There are a variety of reasons why their infrastructure isn't set up to handle snow, and a population with a lack of personal experience handling it also complicates matters.

None of this makes it not hilarious or mockable though.

too true.

Another example is when northern states spend years mocking southern states only to run around screaming like little girls when a hurricane hits.

/that shiat was hilarious.


You do realize over 200 people died from that storm right?
 
2013-07-18 05:06:56 PM

Prevailing Wind: As for the heat, 85 doesn't sound hot unless you've ever been in the tube on a typical summer day and its still hotter than crotch.  I can't imagine what that hellhole must feel like right now.


New York is the same way.  I went there in August and it was like 85 outside and 110 in the subway.

/Boston on the other hand has really, really cold subways.  Dunno why.
 
2013-07-18 05:07:22 PM

Lollipop165: Waaaaaaah!

We have the exact same problems here in NYC and have been handling 100 degrees (110 with humidity) all week just fine. Although admittedly I'm one of those weird people that prefers this weather to anything under 25 degrees.


Are you serious?  25F (w/o wind) is jeans and barn jacket weather. Freakin' weirdo!
 
2013-07-18 05:07:56 PM

dabbletech: 11.  Spent all their money on dental care.

[img.mixedmartialarts.com image 310x165]


You know what's funny? The British get a ton of shiat for their teeth yet they have universal health care that includes dentistry work,up to a point of course. At this point that should be an American in that pic.
 
2013-07-18 05:15:35 PM

Klopfer: ...go to McDonald's next time. You'll get more than one ice cube. Even during winter when it's farking freezing out there....


Decided to try the Sonic breakfast. Ice in the orange juice cup??? I paid more than two farking dollars for it, and when I was finished the cup was still 2/3 full of ice.

/I asked about it when the cup was brought, but was too afraid to send it back. Next time I'll know to order it without ice - or to buy it ANYwhere but Sonic.
 
2013-07-18 05:19:30 PM
Temperatures have been up to 32 celsius,


32 C? Jesus we had 2 a day soccer (football) practices in 95F (35C) in August. 32C is not hot.


Hell it was 90% humidity and 32C today and I just went on a 5 mile jog, mowed the lawn, cleaned the garage (That is closer to 40C in the afternoon). Last week it was 32C I was sitting out on a locomotive in business casual with no AC, high humidity and a laptop on my lap trying to compile software. Just drink lots of water and you'll be fine.


I grew up in an old farm house. We didn't have AC. There are plenty of people in the south with out AC and our grandparents and older didn't have AC.


Yesterday it was 32C.  While on my run yesterday I saw a 6 month pregnant lady walking the dog on the 1 mile loop in our subdivision. 6 months pregnant walking a dog in 32C heat.
 
Come to the midwest, we've seen it all.


Annual London Weather:

Average highest high: July @74F/23.5C.Average lowest low: Feb @35.8F/2.1CRecords (From Manchester)

Record High: 92.7F (33.7C).

Record Low: 7.7F (-13.5C)

Annual Chicago Weather (1981-2010)

Average highest high, July @84.2F/29C.Average lowest low: Jan @18.2F/-7.7C

Record High: 102 (41C).

Record Low: -27F (-33C)
 
2013-07-18 05:19:34 PM

give me doughnuts: Valiente: All of Britain is north of 50N. It is moderated by the Gulf Stream into a sort of Goldilocks zone of frequent rains and temperatures in what North Americans would consider a very narrow range of 0-20C. (It was 36C/98F in Toronto yesterday, by contrast, and we are just south of 44N). If the weather starts to swing in accordance with the high latitude, and/or the Gulf Stream moves or ceases, Britain could be Siberia pretty quickly, with France being Southern Siberia, I suppose...or Northern Saskatchewan.


It's kind of incredible how much the Gulf Stream and Mediterranean (as a heat sink) moderate european weather.
I'm currently at 38 degrees, 12' North latutude, and while we may not get meters of snow every winter, we aren't strangers to the cold. Our record low temperature was -27F, and our 24-hour snowfall record is just shy of two feet.

Messina, Italy is as 38 degrees, 11' North latitude, and I doubt it has snowed there in living memory.


We're doing the Continental, unfortunately.
 
2013-07-18 05:30:52 PM
gweilo8888:

Valiente: British water heaters tend to work on demand and can be as small as toaster ovens.

What is this I don't even.

Every British house I've ever been in has had a large ...


See here, and here, and view this:

upload.wikimedia.org

Not found in the Duke's Palace, perhaps, but very common in student digs, B&Bs and the smaller sort of hostelry. Becoming fairly common here (Canada), even where space is rarely an issue, because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.
 
2013-07-18 05:33:18 PM

Smeggy Smurf: Valiente: Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?

Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.

Who cares?  She's hot


I didn't think that was up for debate. I'd ball her monsterously.
 
2013-07-18 05:35:13 PM

calufrax: It will be difficult for anyone with Dave's Syndrome...

[24.media.tumblr.com image 438x252]


That guy is the spitting image of my cousin Pete.
 
2013-07-18 05:40:25 PM

mjjt: Smeggy Smurf: Valiente: Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?

Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.

Who cares?  She's hot

Exactly

(but if you care  Link )

(article also lists "Number of people worldwide who Google "Is Halle Berry black?": 260 ")


Hmm. Apparently, according to that theory, I'm black, which I've always suspected. As have my girlfriends. And despite looking like a tanning-capable Irish football hooligan.

/no he dint.
 
2013-07-18 05:43:21 PM

Mose: dittybopper:
Also, the human body can put up with a very high temperatures so long as it stays hydrated properly.  Keep the water intake up, and the electrolytes balanced, and you should be fine as long as you don't have any major underlying health issues.

It's uncomfortable, but there is no reason why temperatures in the mid-80s to low 90s should be *FATAL*.

But keeping a human's core temperature in the safe range is heavily dependent on relative humidity since we rely on evaporative cooling.  One can be fully hydrated and still suffer hyperthermia.  90 degrees with a dew point in the 50s could be considerably safer from a hyperthermic standpoint than 84 and a dewpoint of 78.  The latter of which we had in my part of New England about a week ago.  Never seen the dewpoint that high and I hope to never see that again.


We had a high of 95 F and a dew point of 76 F yesterday.  No to tiny bit of breeze, humidity got over 90%.   Freaking hell.  I fainted for the first time since I was in 4th grade (drank plenty of water and Gatorade too, although medication I'm on likely didn't help).  My just moved here from Texas coworker worried that she'd turn into us in a few years.  Good times.

I don't have AC in the house either but dehumidifier/fans/creek and tall trees shading the south side of the house have gotten us through the past two years relatively easily except yesterday.  Holy crap.  Even the flipping basement was hot.

/Michigan
 
2013-07-18 05:48:40 PM

Valiente: because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.


Um, I get it, and that's definitely a good idea... but my water heater isn't the greatest but doesn't keep water at top temperature unless there's a demand for it.  The water will turn hot relatively quickly during the day - since our weird work schedules mean someone is often awake in the house 9 AM through 2 AM - but at night the heater falls into standby mode.  In the winter I'd stumble out of bed, get up, and wash some dishes using the hot tap - in lukewarm at best water - until the heater kicked in and I could take a properly scalding shower.
 
2013-07-18 05:53:08 PM

Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers



Some of us Americans are of English stock.
 
2013-07-18 06:00:06 PM

darkscout: Temperatures have been up to 32 celsius,
32 C? Jesus we had 2 a day soccer (football) practices in 95F (35C) in August. 32C is not hot.
Hell it was 90% humidity and 32C today and I just went on a 5 mile jog, mowed the lawn, cleaned the garage (That is closer to 40C in the afternoon). Last week it was 32C I was sitting out on a locomotive in business casual with no AC, high humidity and a laptop on my lap trying to compile software. Just drink lots of water and you'll be fine.

I grew up in an old farm house. We didn't have AC. There are plenty of people in the south with out AC and our grandparents and older didn't have AC.


Why, back in MY day....
/Threadjack.
 
2013-07-18 06:00:53 PM

mama2tnt: Why, back in MY day....
/Threadjack.


I didn't say AC didn't exist. It was just an old farm house that wasn't retrofitted with AC.
 
2013-07-18 06:01:25 PM

Tom_Slick: Mock26: If you run the current backwards through a heater it produces cold instead.  Problem solved.

/Sigh.  I really wish it worked that way.

Take a 5 gallon bucket, some plastic tubing, and ornamental fountain pump, and an electric fan.   Fill bucket with ice and water, run plastic tubing in front of fan sticking both ends in the bucket, hook one end to pump and Ta Da cheap homemade swamp cooler.


Your ideas are intriguing, and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

I've ran a fan over a stainless steel bowl full of ice before.  Better than nothing, but I've got everything except the ornamental pump here now.  Might give it a go next time around.  Heat's supposed to break tomorrow at least.

trackerbri: At a previous employer we had a bunch of guys coming up from the southern states to Ontario and the repeated question leading up to it was how cold was it going to be in Canada.  It was April or something stupid.  Anyway, we decked out the office reception with snowshoes, snow-shovels, toques, parkas and mitts.

"What are those for?"
"Those are the loaners, in case you come to work without checking the weather and get caught in a snowstorm."
"In April?"
"Wouldn't be the first time."

One guy spent the whole visit wondering if he was going to be snowed in for his return flight.


I got snowbound in Toronto for two days one spring break a few years ago, so getting a kick, etc.

To be fair, IIRC that was March and not April but close enough.  And we get the same stupid questions when we have folks coming to work with us in Michigan from any other state.  I mean.... the internet exists, just look it up, dammit.  And even though we're north of Windsor, it's not like we're Canadian eh.
 
2013-07-18 06:03:48 PM
i live in Yuma, AZ
complaints about high temperatures always amuse me.
 
2013-07-18 06:05:25 PM

darkscout: mama2tnt: Why, back in MY day....
/Threadjack.

I didn't say AC didn't exist. It was just an old farm house that wasn't retrofitted with AC.


I lived in an non air conditioned house built in 1860 for a year.  It was considerably cooler than most other non-air-conditioned houses because it was built for that, dammit.  Two large covered porches, and a huge attic for all the heat to flow up to and out of that covered the entire non-porch footprint of the house.  Wood floors and decent sized windows in every room and in the hallways, large trees planted when the house was built (or possibly built around) shading most sides.  If you're in a house built to deal with non AC conditions it makes a world of difference, and I'm willing to wager an old farm house certainly qualified.
 
2013-07-18 06:07:39 PM

geekasaurus: i live in Yuma, AZ
complaints about high temperatures always amuse me.


Dry heat, etc.

Coworker from AZ was breaking yesterday in MI and mentioned that she'd rather be in Arizona.  Humid enough that even being in the shade really didn't give all that much relief, and it didn't really cool down considerably at night either.
 
2013-07-18 06:12:02 PM

Mikey1969: gweilo8888: Also, keeps what cold in, precisely? Did you miss how most UK homes have no A/C, because for the overwhelming majority of the time, most UK homes *need* no A/C?

My point was that just because there's insulation, it doesn't heat the place up. By saying that it keeps the cold in, I was implying that when there is A/C, it's what keeps the cold inside. I should have explained that better. Having less insulation isn't suddenly going to make your house cooler in a (chuckle) "heat wave". Sorry, I only chuckle because for the entire 22 years I lived in Arizona, we were past 88.5 degrees by the beginning of March until somewhere around the end of November. Our railroad tracks, roads, sidewalks, and most importantly, people seemed to do OK.


So you missed that 99.5% of British housing lacked any kind of A/C (even bad A/C)? Or you just didn't want to let the facts get in the way of a good snark?

I'm sure Arizona would fall to its knees were it to experience weather conditions it wasn't developed for. And that's precisely the point. Whether you can survive the weather you get every single farking year isn't the issue. It's what happens when you get the rare change in weather.

Your smugness fails to take account of that.

Valiente: gweilo8888:

Valiente: Not found in the Duke's Palace, perhaps, but very common in student digs, B&Bs and the smaller sort of hostelry. Becoming fairly common here (Canada), even where space is rarely an issue, because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.


I'm very familiar with it, and frankly ignoring the cost issue I vastly prefer it. (Well, for gas heat anyway; the electric "instant" water heaters I've used were anything but.)

But I've not used it in the UK, with the sole exception of student digs. (Where they don't give two hoots about cost of living for the tenant, just about getting something that's cheap to repair or replace when it gets broken.) And what you get in B&Bs / hostels bears no relation to what the typical Brit has in their house.

When power is more expensive in the day time than it is at night, using an instant heater is MORE expensive than one which stores the hot water. That's entirely the point. Many of my British relatives aren't terribly well off -- more than a few don't even own a car -- yet they all have storage water heaters that run in the middle of the night only.
 
2013-07-18 06:15:28 PM

abhorrent1: I still disagree that 85 degrees is a heat wave. So they're excuses are invalid.

/92 here right now


85 is bullshiat and welded rail twisting in that is just an excuse for poor engineering.

/goddam brits still think they have the corner on everything.
 
2013-07-18 06:31:29 PM
different type of heat. you can't really compare.

i guess we have to mock britain and europe for stuff... lets face it the world is getting fed up of mocking the US... it's not even fun anymore.

one nation under god. yeah come on. even god doesn't want you
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-07-18 07:03:01 PM

HailRobonia: If only they had windmills to keep them cool.


encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2013-07-18 07:11:09 PM
Did they add in drinking fountains as a joke?  Who drinks from those disease infested things?
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-07-18 07:20:33 PM

Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: Valiente: Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?

Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.

Who cares?  She's hot

I didn't think that was up for debate. I'd ball her monsterously.


"Been there, done that"
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2013-07-18 07:20:55 PM
1. The design of modern flats The average UK one-bedroom home is a compact 46 sq m (495 sq ft), according to the Royal Institute of British Architects. And as well as being on the small side it's also increasingly very insulated. This can be a good thing when it's cold and damp outside but not always helpful during a heatwave when a nice draught could make all the difference. There are even fears that homes insulated under the government's Green Deal could actually lead to deaths.
============================================================

Why on Earth does no one understand how insulation works? Insulation works to keep heat in AND to keep heat out. It works to keep everything at the same temperature. Not allowing cold or heat in.

The only difference between a house in, say, the UK or Alaska and a House in Texas is that a house in Texas is going to have shades on every non-north facing window (vice-versa for southern hemisphere) while a house in the UK or Alaska is going to have lots of skylights and no blides so as to invite the sun in when it can.

The solution? Buy some window blinds. If you're too cheap for that, tape some blankets or, hell, even paper. Something to reflect the sun away.

When the sun goes down, break out the fan.
 
jvl
2013-07-18 07:24:35 PM

my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Lets say San Fran averages between 50* and 110*, they need to install rails such that the gaps aren't too big at 50* (when fully contracted) and not to small at 110*.  So they need to account for an expansion resulting from a 60* temperature difference.


SF routinely gets into the mid 20s during winter.
 
2013-07-18 09:38:49 PM
They should move back into the subway tunnels like ww2. Probably cooler and safe from German bombings.
 
2013-07-18 09:57:59 PM
"it's also increasingly very insulated.  This can be a good thing when it's cold and damp outside but not always helpful during a heatwave"

Sorry, but no, insulation keeps heat out as well as in. That's why energy efficient windows advertise by shining a heat lamp rather than blowing cold air on them.
 
2013-07-18 10:11:05 PM
Since Fark has spent the last week wasting greeenlit links, oboviously at the hand of some admin who fancies the Brits (YTISWWT), being concerned as to how hot it is in the UK. Here is one reason to shut the Fark Up about it, Who The F*CK Cares!!!!!
 
2013-07-18 10:11:33 PM

Valiente: Much of their plumbing runs outside of the house, as many quite functional houses predate the widespread invention of plumbing.


...

No.

You may want to look up the meaning of the word "plumbing", taking into consideration why lead is known as Pb.

And there are many historically, and archaeologically interesting sites and structures within the UK. Settlements going back tens of thousands of years, kind of thing.

Functional houses pre-dating the invention of plumbing (c. a couple of thousand years ago)? Not really.
 
rka
2013-07-18 10:21:37 PM

ReapTheChaos: "it's also increasingly very insulated.  This can be a good thing when it's cold and damp outside but not always helpful during a heatwave"

Sorry, but no, insulation keeps heat out as well as in. That's why energy efficient windows advertise by shining a heat lamp rather than blowing cold air on them.


Indeed. Have none of these people seen a beer-coozy?

Insulation...keeping my beer cold. Mind Blown.
 
2013-07-18 10:28:15 PM

Mikey1969: ZAZ: 4. Roads don't handle heat well either

A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.

Sounds like an engineering issue to me. Roads and sidewalks work just fine in such frosty cities as Phoenix and Las Vegas.


You want something that won't turn into a disjointed pile o rock and concrete come spring after a low of -30F? And then get into the comfy heat of 100+? The fact that they don't explode every day of summer is commendable in WI. Last summer was only a surprise because Mother Nature was trolling. Low of 65-high of 105 and humid as balls. Rapid heat changes are much worse than small ones.
 
2013-07-18 10:49:17 PM
Meh it was 118 here last summer with 100% humidity, sweatily ball weather indeed.
I've seen the asphalt look like pudding it was so hot.

Why do we panic when it snows or ices up? Mountains, and lack of proper equipment to handle it. A snow plow is a road grader and a salt truck is a tractor with a broadcast seeder on the back.
 
2013-07-18 11:34:58 PM

rka: ReapTheChaos: "it's also increasingly very insulated.  This can be a good thing when it's cold and damp outside but not always helpful during a heatwave"

Sorry, but no, insulation keeps heat out as well as in. That's why energy efficient windows advertise by shining a heat lamp rather than blowing cold air on them.

Indeed. Have none of these people seen a beer-coozy?

Insulation...keeping my beer cold. Mind Blown.


HOW DO THERMOS'  KNOW?
 
2013-07-18 11:58:44 PM

gweilo8888: Mikey1969: gweilo8888: Also, keeps what cold in, precisely? Did you miss how most UK homes have no A/C, because for the overwhelming majority of the time, most UK homes *need* no A/C?

My point was that just because there's insulation, it doesn't heat the place up. By saying that it keeps the cold in, I was implying that when there is A/C, it's what keeps the cold inside. I should have explained that better. Having less insulation isn't suddenly going to make your house cooler in a (chuckle) "heat wave". Sorry, I only chuckle because for the entire 22 years I lived in Arizona, we were past 88.5 degrees by the beginning of March until somewhere around the end of November. Our railroad tracks, roads, sidewalks, and most importantly, people seemed to do OK.

So you missed that 99.5% of British housing lacked any kind of A/C (even bad A/C)? Or you just didn't want to let the facts get in the way of a good snark?

I'm sure Arizona would fall to its knees were it to experience weather conditions it wasn't developed for. And that's precisely the point. Whether you can survive the weather you get every single farking year isn't the issue. It's what happens when you get the rare change in weather.

Your smugness fails to take account of that.

Valiente: gweilo8888:

Valiente: Not found in the Duke's Palace, perhaps, but very common in student digs, B&Bs and the smaller sort of hostelry. Becoming fairly common here (Canada), even where space is rarely an issue, because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.

I'm very familiar with it, and frankly ignoring the cost issue I vastly prefer it. (Well, for gas heat anyway; the electric "instant" water heaters I've used were anything but.)

gweilo8888: When power is more expensive in the day time than it is at night, using an instant heater is MORE expensive than one which stores the hot water. That's entirely the point. Many of my British relatives aren't terribly well off -- more than a few don't even own a car -- yet they all have storage water heaters that run in the middle of the night only.


I understand and concur completely. Of course, being somewhat antique myself, I recall visits to equally poor (by my middle-class North American standards) to friends and relatives whose heaters, "gas meters" and phones were coin-operated. Strangely, I suspect that was more economical in money, if less economical in time waiting for a couple of miserable gallons to heat up in order to produce a Protestant-grade shower.

Britain in the '80s, despite having better resolution on the TV, better music and even early computers in homes, seemed a bit Dickensian to me in terms of utilities. Do they still have "piss walls" in the older pubs?
 
2013-07-18 11:59:12 PM
WHOLE HOUSE ATTIC VENT FANS

They will save you a buttload of money on your electrical bill.  My highest electrical bill
last year for an 1100 sq ft house (and this includes an electric stove and water heater)
in SE Michigan, was $90.  And that was in August when it hot and humid as fark like
it is this summer.

i51.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-19 12:02:53 AM
The average UK one-bedroom home is a compact 46 sq m (495 sq ft),

That there is what their bowing down to their nanny state gets them.  I would seriously farking rebel if the only option was a sub 500 foot space with shared walls.

As for their 10 explanations about why they are pansies about 85°F heat they don't really add up to me.  While I have air conditioning I usually set my thermostat around 82° to minimize the cost. Its at worst mildly warm.  An extra 3° would be uncomfortable but hardly a crisis.  For 15 years I had a unit in a two story 4-plex in San Jose and had no air conditioning.  It regularly hit 85° in the summer and I was just fine. Sometimes I abandoned my bedroom to sleep downstairs but it wouldn't have killed me if I couldn't.

I suspect the explanation is less in the infrastructure and is more likely what the average brit is acclimated to.  Its time for me to put on a somewhat heavy jacket if it drops below 55°F or so but they probably think of that as t-shirt weather.
 
2013-07-19 12:04:03 AM

Valiente: gweilo8888: Mikey1969: gweilo8888: Also, keeps what cold in, precisely? Did you miss how most UK homes have no A/C, because for the overwhelming majority of the time, most UK homes *need* no A/C?

My point was that just because there's insulation, it doesn't heat the place up. By saying that it keeps the cold in, I was implying that when there is A/C, it's what keeps the cold inside. I should have explained that better. Having less insulation isn't suddenly going to make your house cooler in a (chuckle) "heat wave". Sorry, I only chuckle because for the entire 22 years I lived in Arizona, we were past 88.5 degrees by the beginning of March until somewhere around the end of November. Our railroad tracks, roads, sidewalks, and most importantly, people seemed to do OK.

So you missed that 99.5% of British housing lacked any kind of A/C (even bad A/C)? Or you just didn't want to let the facts get in the way of a good snark?

I'm sure Arizona would fall to its knees were it to experience weather conditions it wasn't developed for. And that's precisely the point. Whether you can survive the weather you get every single farking year isn't the issue. It's what happens when you get the rare change in weather.

Your smugness fails to take account of that.

Valiente: gweilo8888:

Valiente: Not found in the Duke's Palace, perhaps, but very common in student digs, B&Bs and the smaller sort of hostelry. Becoming fairly common here (Canada), even where space is rarely an issue, because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.

I'm very familiar with it, and frankly ignoring the cost issue I vastly prefer it. (Well, for gas heat anyway; the electric "instant" water heaters I've used were anything but.)gweilo8888: When power is more expensive in the day time than it is at night, using an instant heater is MORE expensive than one which stores the hot water. That's entirely the point. Many of my British relati ...


Hey piss walls are awesome. I don't have any problems with piss troughs either.
 
2013-07-19 12:05:17 AM

iron de havilland: Valiente: Much of their plumbing runs outside of the house, as many quite functional houses predate the widespread invention of plumbing.

...

No.

You may want to look up the meaning of the word "plumbing", taking into consideration why lead is known as Pb.

And there are many historically, and archaeologically interesting sites and structures within the UK. Settlements going back tens of thousands of years, kind of thing.

Functional houses pre-dating the invention of plumbing (c. a couple of thousand years ago)? Not really.


Plumbing in the conventional sense left with the Romans and didn't really establish itself in a meaningful way until statisticians sussed up cholera from wells next to cesspits in the 1840s. Many water supply and sewage lines in older British row houses and flats (like where my relatives live) run not to central waste stacks or feeder lines WITHIN the walls (and therefore subject to house heat) but down the exterior walls and are therefore subject to the elements.

That's fine if you remember to shut off and drain them every time it goes below -2C (which is getting increasingly common in Britain), but that's a big if. Retrofitting pre-1860 housing stock for anything other than mains and quarter-inch gas lines was and remains expensive...rolling the dice that a hard frost won't occur in a southern English winter has actually been a pretty good wager.
 
2013-07-19 02:00:45 AM
85 degrees... that's almost room temperature ffs. Hahahaha...
 
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