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(BBC)   Since Fark has spent the last week mocking the UK for its 85 degree "heatwave", here are ten reasons why the country is so poorly equipped to deal with it   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 207
    More: Followup, Network Rail, building projects, energy consumption, GCSE, Mintel  
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14971 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jul 2013 at 2:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



207 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-07-18 01:47:02 PM  
Last week, 200 ScotRail services were cancelled or held up because of the heat. In temperatures of 30C (86F) the rails themselves can easily reach 50C.
The UK network uses continuous welded rail as this is safer, stronger and allows trains to travel more quickly over it, Network Rail says.


In Massachusetts commuter rail slows to 30 mph when temperature reaches 90. The state (country?) has not historically been a fan of continuous welded rail. Some has been installed over the past 15 years.

4. Roads don't handle heat well either

A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.
 
2013-07-18 02:04:28 PM  
I'm sorry my apology melted before I could put it in the post, Britain
 
2013-07-18 02:12:13 PM  
It's like when we make fun of the southern states for being pretty much completely shut down whenever they get about an inch of snow. There are a variety of reasons why their infrastructure isn't set up to handle snow, and a population with a lack of personal experience handling it also complicates matters.

None of this makes it not hilarious or mockable though.
 
2013-07-18 02:33:29 PM  

TheOmni: None of this makes it not hilarious or mockable though.

 
2013-07-18 02:35:53 PM  
It's pining for the fjords.
 
2013-07-18 02:37:09 PM  
#11  www.journeywoman.com
 
2013-07-18 02:37:55 PM  
They can't figure out where to shove in 'u' into 'air conditioning'.
 
2013-07-18 02:39:12 PM  
I still disagree that 85 degrees is a heat wave. So they're excuses are invalid.

/92 here right now
 
2013-07-18 02:39:42 PM  

amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]


man when i visited europe last late summer, i missed ice cubes badly. why are those losers stuck in the middle ages? give me my AC and ice cubes any day.
 
2013-07-18 02:40:03 PM  
You can get a window shaker in the States for under $200.  How much are they in the old empire?
 
2013-07-18 02:40:07 PM  
Air Con was a pretty sweet Nic Cage movie.
 
2013-07-18 02:40:42 PM  

amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]


#12  4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-07-18 02:40:42 PM  
here is ten reasons indeed.
 
2013-07-18 02:40:47 PM  
Real reason: The British are so white you can see their veins and organs through their skin.
 
2013-07-18 02:41:47 PM  
"On railways there are traditionally expansion joints, using small gaps in the rail. But once the rail has expanded to fill those gaps you are in trouble.  "

Maybe in the early 1900's.  Modern railways use stretched rails to account for expansion.  I would hope even British rails would account for temps to occasionally go into the high 80s.
 
2013-07-18 02:42:02 PM  
Subby: It's not "85 degree", it's "90 degree". Temperatures have been up to 32 celsius, which is 89.6 fahrenheit.
 
2013-07-18 02:42:41 PM  
A Mintel report in 2008 found that just 0.5% of houses and flats in the UK had any kind of air con.

I wonder what percentage of their poor people have refrigerators?
 
2013-07-18 02:43:58 PM  
It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.
 
2013-07-18 02:44:15 PM  

coldcuts: Maybe in the early 1900's.  Modern railways use stretched rails to account for expansion.  I would hope even British rails would account for temps to occasionally go into the high 80s.


They don't account for leaves on the track, which is an annual occurrence. Why would you expect them to account for the one year in fifty with good weather?
 
2013-07-18 02:44:44 PM  

abhorrent1: I still disagree that 85 degrees is a heat wave. So they're excuses are invalid.

/92 here right now


They are indeed a nation of excuses
 
jvl
2013-07-18 02:45:42 PM  

ZAZ: Last week, 200 ScotRail services were cancelled or held up because of the heat. In temperatures of 30C (86F) the rails themselves can easily reach 50C.
The UK network uses continuous welded rail as this is safer, stronger and allows trains to travel more quickly over it, Network Rail says.

In Massachusetts commuter rail slows to 30 mph when temperature reaches 90. The state (country?) has not historically been a fan of continuous welded rail. Some has been installed over the past 15 years.


Yet somehow BART in the San Franscico Bay Area (with continuous rails) magically runs at full speed even when temperatures run up to 110F.
 
2013-07-18 02:45:45 PM  
So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers
 
2013-07-18 02:46:00 PM  

TheOmni: It's like when we make fun of the southern states for being pretty much completely shut down whenever they get about an inch of snow. There are a variety of reasons why their infrastructure isn't set up to handle snow, and a population with a lack of personal experience handling it also complicates matters.

None of this makes it not hilarious or mockable though.


Well, I grew up in the South, and now I live in the North.  They do mock people, but you know what I noticed?  They can't drive on snow or ice, either.  So at least Southerners have the sense to stay inside when they shouldn't be driving.

We had a "heat wave" the past two summers (this year was more moderate), and people were dying when the temperature reached 90 degrees!  Oh, my, how terrible.  So the whining goes both ways.
 
2013-07-18 02:46:38 PM  
I read about Black Sunday on wiki last night and holy shiat everything in Australia is out to murder the humans.
 
2013-07-18 02:46:42 PM  
Do you all have fans over there? It's 94 and humid as hell here and I'm comfy in front of my $25 fan.

Fake draft. (Draughts are beer.)
 
2013-07-18 02:48:07 PM  

teylix: amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]

man when i visited europe last late summer, i missed ice cubes badly. why are those losers stuck in the middle ages? give me my AC and ice cubes any day.


Amen to that! It's damn hard to find an ice cube in Germany. One time, when I got a coke, I was given one ice cube and a room temperature soda.... sigh... The waitress thought I was insane when I explained to her to FILL the entire glass with ice.

However, when I do visit, the whole family buys "ice cube bags" just for me (they think I'm nuts) Basically plastic bags that have little "pockets" You fill them with water tie them off and stuff them in the freezer and you get little round ice cubes. They start making me ice two weeks before I show up. It's quite comical.
 
2013-07-18 02:49:38 PM  
Wow. Britain really is a shiathole place to live. I thought that was just a stereotype.
 
2013-07-18 02:50:48 PM  

bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.


I detect Canadian weather-brag.

Yes we all know its cold as farkity farkin fark up there in winter.  We also know you sometimes get 80 quintillion metric shiattonnes of snow, twice a day, uphill both ways.

Oh, and here in the US, we're idiots and weaklings because we don't have 3 snowplows and 47 loads of salt for every man, woman and child. And we wreck our cars in wholesale fashion after 15 minutes of sleet.

But you guys are SO NICE about pointing it out.

The point is, if the weather is not what you generally are equipped for, ITS NEWS TO US SO CLIMB BACK IN YOUR FARKING IGLOO AND EAT YOUR GODDAMNED ROAST PEGUIN.
 
2013-07-18 02:50:51 PM  
London has the same latitude as calgary, and similar to Saskatoon . Seems like it should be colder there
 
2013-07-18 02:52:14 PM  

ZAZ: Last week, 200 ScotRail services were cancelled or held up because of the heat. In temperatures of 30C (86F) the rails themselves can easily reach 50C.
The UK network uses continuous welded rail as this is safer, stronger and allows trains to travel more quickly over it, Network Rail says.

In Massachusetts commuter rail slows to 30 mph when temperature reaches 90. The state (country?) has not historically been a fan of continuous welded rail. Some has been installed over the past 15 years.

4. Roads don't handle heat well either

A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.


That was an SUV.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlQcVQw18V8

The concrete around here EXPLODES at the joints when it gets hot if it's not engineered right, usually it's large basketball sized chunks thrown a couple of feet, resulting in a big gap and rubble on the road.
 
2013-07-18 02:52:35 PM  
PENGUIN

/rage typo
 
2013-07-18 02:53:39 PM  

FTA:

just 0.5% of houses and flats in the UK had any kind of air con...the US, where nearly 100 million homes have it

I hate when "journalists"  they do this.  How the hell am I supposed to compare the percent of UK houses to the number of US houses.  This juxtaposition is utterly meaningless without more context.
 
2013-07-18 02:54:13 PM  

bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.


In the American South that would be spring.

Yes, with your "high" humidity.
 
2013-07-18 02:54:44 PM  

cbauer357: teylix: amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]

man when i visited europe last late summer, i missed ice cubes badly. why are those losers stuck in the middle ages? give me my AC and ice cubes any day.

Amen to that! It's damn hard to find an ice cube in Germany. One time, when I got a coke, I was given one ice cube and a room temperature soda.... sigh... The waitress thought I was insane when I explained to her to FILL the entire glass with ice.

However, when I do visit, the whole family buys "ice cube bags" just for me (they think I'm nuts) Basically plastic bags that have little "pockets" You fill them with water tie them off and stuff them in the freezer and you get little round ice cubes. They start making me ice two weeks before I show up. It's quite comical.


I got used to drinking beer warm half of the time because my fridge was tiny when I lived in Germany and half of my alcohol purchases were spontaneous in nature so I could not chill them in the fridge. Hell the only place I ever saw ice for sale was at Esso, and it was ~5 Euro for a tiny bag. It might have been a half kilo or so.
 
2013-07-18 02:55:02 PM  
11.  Spent all their money on dental care.

img.mixedmartialarts.com
 
2013-07-18 02:55:11 PM  

thisiszombocom: London has the same latitude as calgary, and similar to Saskatoon . Seems like it should be colder there


The North Atlantic Current apparently has a lot to do with keeping its temperature more mild than its latitude would suggest.
 
2013-07-18 02:56:21 PM  

TheOmni: It's like when we make fun of the southern states for being pretty much completely shut down whenever they get about an inch of snow. There are a variety of reasons why their infrastructure isn't set up to handle snow, and a population with a lack of personal experience handling it also complicates matters.


No, it's actually quite different.

Getting an inch of snow means the roads are going to be slippery, and if you don't have the *PHYSICAL* infrastructure to deal with it (snowplows, huge piles of sand and salt), it can be a problem.  And that infrastructure costs money to maintain.  It's just not economical for government to maintain that in places that rarely get snow.

On the other hand, a couple of window fans (one facing in, one facing out in different rooms) can provide the draft necessary to keep a flat reasonably cool.  In fact, you'd want to do that at night, to get the cool air in, and then button up the flat and close the curtains/shades/blinds during the day to keep it cooler.

Also, the human body can put up with a very high temperatures so long as it stays hydrated properly.  Keep the water intake up, and the electrolytes balanced, and you should be fine as long as you don't have any major underlying health issues.

It's uncomfortable, but there is no reason why temperatures in the mid-80s to low 90s should be *FATAL*.
 
2013-07-18 02:56:35 PM  

23FPB23: The point is, if the weather is not what you generally are equipped for, ITS NEWS TO US SO CLIMB BACK IN YOUR FARKING IGLOO AND EAT YOUR GODDAMNED ROAST PEGUIN.


Roast penguin sounds delicious.
 
2013-07-18 02:57:02 PM  
To all you Brits: Why do you insist on calling it Nasa when it's NASA? (they cited a NASA study in TFA)
 
2013-07-18 02:57:32 PM  
A couple I know took a trip to Wales a few years a go. They reserched the typical sort of weather for Wales in July, and packed accordingly. It was 2006, and right at the beginning of the worst heatwave in a century. Roads were closed because the blacktop softened too much to drive on. Trains were cancelled because the rails were buckling.

But they did get to watch some filming of the Doctor Who Christmas Special.
 
2013-07-18 02:57:32 PM  

bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.


Hey, another Ottawa farker! The Citizen said the humidex hit 47 yesterday. (I can't handle Fahrenheit nonsense.)
 
2013-07-18 02:57:50 PM  

23FPB23: Oh, and here in the US, we're idiots and weaklings because we don't have 3 snowplows and 47 loads of salt for every man, woman and child.


Actually, we have that in my neck of the woods.  It usually goes significantly below zero (F) every winter.  We've had days where it hit -30 F.
 
2013-07-18 02:59:11 PM  
}1)They live in something called "Flats" while normal humans live in houses.

2)A/C hasn't been invented yet.

3)Something about trains that they haven't figured out yet.

4)They didn't learn anything about roads, either in all those years of "civilization"

5)They don't care about people.

6)Swimming? Is that like going to the dentist?

7)No sitting allowed. It's the nanny state.

8)Water? Isn't that what the dentist makes you spit with? Gross.

9)'ave a pint, mate.
 
2013-07-18 02:59:39 PM  

bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.


Whenever we have foreign visitors in the office (in Edmonton) I'm always disappointed that it isn't -25 C or below. I want them to experience the coldest we have to offer. I don't want them leaving and saying back home "I don't see what all the fuss is about"
 
2013-07-18 02:59:42 PM  
Sorry, we in the US are just a little over 200 years old. How old is the British Empire? I think you guys would have some infrastructure in place now.

And "well insulated" doesn't mean that your "flat" will be hotter, otherwise, they wouldn't even bother with insulation in homes in Phoenix. It keeps the cold in, also. Not having a cross breeze does. Open a window in different walls and things will make a difference.

And for God's sake, put in some more swimming pools and water fountains.
 
2013-07-18 03:00:48 PM  
TFA says workers are more likely to encounter air conditioning at work than at home, then whines about workers looking longingly outside and hoping for a siesta.
 
2013-07-18 03:00:52 PM  
The only common Freude is Schadenfreude.
 
2013-07-18 03:00:55 PM  

mmagdalene: Real reason: The British are so white you can see their veins and organs through their skin.


Are we now?

lh6.googleusercontent.com

Thinks not.
 
2013-07-18 03:02:20 PM  
So you're telling me it's so awful, because 85 degrees turns London into an average US city circa 1980?
shiatty roads, no rail, no pools/drinking fountains, no AC, crappy housing not designed for air flow, the elderly fending for themselves --
You're describing "an average, reasonably warm summer day" from not-so-long-ago.
 
2013-07-18 03:02:42 PM  

coldcuts: "On railways there are traditionally expansion joints, using small gaps in the rail. But once the rail has expanded to fill those gaps you are in trouble.  "

Maybe in the early 1900's.  Modern railways use stretched rails to account for expansion.  I would hope even British rails would account for temps to occasionally go into the high 80s.


Yeah, considering they can have trains in the Sonoran Desert and the Mohave Desert, i'm pretty sure that they can handle temps 30 degrees cooler than those places hit every year.
 
2013-07-18 03:04:04 PM  

ZAZ: 4. Roads don't handle heat well either

A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.


Sounds like an engineering issue to me. Roads and sidewalks work just fine in such frosty cities as Phoenix and Las Vegas.
 
2013-07-18 03:04:06 PM  

ZAZ: A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.


The only thing strange about that was the timing; concrete buckling at the seams is fairly common up here in Wisconsinland.

Here's another fun one:   http://youtu.be/i-zVEq3d8ws
 
2013-07-18 03:04:16 PM  

give me doughnuts: A couple I know took a trip to Wales a few years a go. They reserched the typical sort of weather for Wales in July, and packed accordingly. It was 2006, and right at the beginning of the worst heatwave in a century in three years. Roads were closed because the blacktop softened too much to drive on. Trains were cancelled because the rails were buckling.

But they did get to watch some filming of the Doctor Who Christmas Special.


Summer of 2003 saw London hit 100 F for the first time in recorded history. I was in Germany for the 2003 heat wave. I thought it highly amusing seeing people wear jeans in 95+ degree weather. Didn't see too many Germans under the age of 25-30 wearing shorts, and plenty of Germans my age stuck to wearing pants.
 
2013-07-18 03:05:22 PM  

dabbletech: 11.  Spent all their money on dental care.

[img.mixedmartialarts.com image 310x165]



How much did they save by not buying tweezers?
 
2013-07-18 03:06:43 PM  
When the Canadians are making fun of your being too acclimated to cold to handle the heat, you are officially fair game.
 
2013-07-18 03:07:13 PM  
If only they had windmills to keep them cool.
 
2013-07-18 03:07:19 PM  

TheOmni: It's like when we make fun of the southern states for being pretty much completely shut down whenever they get about an inch of snow. There are a variety of reasons why their infrastructure isn't set up to handle snow, and a population with a lack of personal experience handling it also complicates matters.

None of this makes it not hilarious or mockable though.


Indeed. British water heaters tend to work on demand and can be as small as toaster ovens. Much of their plumbing runs outside of the house, as many quite functional houses predate the widespread invention of plumbing. So you can imagine the effect of a cold snap longer than, say, 24 hours. Hint: It involves a lot of snapping.

All of Britain is north of 50N. It is moderated by the Gulf Stream into a sort of Goldilocks zone of frequent rains and temperatures in what North Americans would consider a very narrow range of 0-20C. (It was 36C/98F in Toronto yesterday, by contrast, and we are just south of 44N). If the weather starts to swing in accordance with the high latitude, and/or the Gulf Stream moves or ceases, Britain could be Siberia pretty quickly, with France being Southern Siberia, I suppose...or Northern Saskatchewan.

They wouldn't do well. Most of them don't have words for "snow shovel, road salt and tire chains".
 
2013-07-18 03:08:10 PM  
Just checked outside and it is 90f degrees, which is uncommonly cool for this time of year in the afternoon.  When are ya frickin limeys gonna learn to put ice in yer tea?

/posted while sitting in front of my 30 year old box fan.
 
2013-07-18 03:08:40 PM  
Isn't 85 degrees in Britain like eleventy billion on the American scale?

No wonder people have to go to THE hospital in such conditions.
 
2013-07-18 03:08:59 PM  
dittybopper:
Also, the human body can put up with a very high temperatures so long as it stays hydrated properly.  Keep the water intake up, and the electrolytes balanced, and you should be fine as long as you don't have any major underlying health issues.

It's uncomfortable, but there is no reason why temperatures in the mid-80s to low 90s should be *FATAL*.


But keeping a human's core temperature in the safe range is heavily dependent on relative humidity since we rely on evaporative cooling.  One can be fully hydrated and still suffer hyperthermia.  90 degrees with a dew point in the 50s could be considerably safer from a hyperthermic standpoint than 84 and a dewpoint of 78.  The latter of which we had in my part of New England about a week ago.  Never seen the dewpoint that high and I hope to never see that again.
 
2013-07-18 03:10:06 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers


Hybrid vigour for the win!


encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
www.vibe.com
 
2013-07-18 03:11:00 PM  

abhorrent1: I still disagree that 85 degrees is a heat wave. So they're THEIR excuses are invalid.

/92 here right now


FTFM.
/95 here right now.
 
2013-07-18 03:12:20 PM  

23FPB23: PENGUIN

/rage typo


WRONG HEMISPHERE, MORAN.

/geography, basic.
 
2013-07-18 03:12:41 PM  

HailRobonia: If only they had windmills to keep them cool.


I lol'd.  It took far too long for that line to be used in this thread.
 
2013-07-18 03:13:55 PM  

bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.


+1

Although I worked in Chalk River this winter (now too, but speaking of cold..), and a few days were chilly enough to halt nuclear fission let me tell ya..

/we put on a sweater
 
2013-07-18 03:14:10 PM  
What about cars in Britain?  What are the percentage of them that have A/C?

/it's currently 86 degrees F here in southeast USA.  I'm very comfortable.
 
2013-07-18 03:14:21 PM  
All I took out of that article:

news.bbcimg.co.uk

Drinking fountains point straight up in the UK?  Gross.
 
2013-07-18 03:16:09 PM  

coldcuts: "On railways there are traditionally expansion joints, using small gaps in the rail. But once the rail has expanded to fill those gaps you are in trouble.  "

Maybe in the early 1900's.  Modern railways use stretched rails to account for expansion.  I would hope even British rails would account for temps to occasionally go into the high 80s.


They still use gauge the width of roman chariot wheels, or so I've heard.
 
2013-07-18 03:17:01 PM  

Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]


 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?
 
2013-07-18 03:17:49 PM  

Rezurok: Drinking fountains point straight up in the UK? Gross


Eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwwwww! You're right!.  No wonder there's not enough of them, nobody in his right mind would use one designed like that, so why put in something no one will use?.
 
2013-07-18 03:17:50 PM  

cbauer357: teylix: amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]

man when i visited europe last late summer, i missed ice cubes badly. why are those losers stuck in the middle ages? give me my AC and ice cubes any day.

Amen to that! It's damn hard to find an ice cube in Germany. One time, when I got a coke, I was given one ice cube and a room temperature soda.... sigh... The waitress thought I was insane when I explained to her to FILL the entire glass with ice.


Because you clearly are. If the glass is full of ice cubes you get less coke, so what's the point in ordering a coke anyway? (Oh, and go to McDonald's next time. You'll get more than one ice cube. Even during winter when it's farking freezing out there. Bastards.)
 
2013-07-18 03:18:54 PM  
Brits are such pussies. They whine about literally everything possible. Except for standing in line. Which is apparently like the British equivalent of Paradise.

Also, for you Canucks, your little winter breezes aren't cold. They're laughable. I'm a Texan and I spent 6 months in Adak...in the winter, most often in the water.

It's not hard to adjust your body to wildly varying thermal cycles, you just can't be a fatass who sits on their ass all day.
 
2013-07-18 03:20:09 PM  

lemurs: The North Atlantic Current apparently has a lot to do with keeping its temperature more mild than its latitude would suggest.


Some, but not a lot.  tl;dr version:

"Fifty percent of the winter temperature difference across the North Atlantic is caused by the eastward atmospheric transport of heat released by the ocean that was absorbed and stored in the summer.
Fifty percent is caused by the stationary waves of the atmospheric flow.
The ocean heat transport contributes a small warming across the basin.

The seasonal ocean heat storage and pattern of atmospheric heat transport add up to make winters in western Europe 15 to 20 degrees C warmer than those in eastern North America. A very similar process occurs across the Pacific Ocean. The ocean heat transport warms the North Atlantic Ocean and the land on both sides by a modest few degrees C. The only place where the ocean heat transport fundamentally alters climate is along the coast of northern Norway which would be sea ice-covered were it not for the warm northward flowing Norwegian Current."
 
2013-07-18 03:20:13 PM  

Klopfer: cbauer357: teylix: amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]

man when i visited europe last late summer, i missed ice cubes badly. why are those losers stuck in the middle ages? give me my AC and ice cubes any day.

Amen to that! It's damn hard to find an ice cube in Germany. One time, when I got a coke, I was given one ice cube and a room temperature soda.... sigh... The waitress thought I was insane when I explained to her to FILL the entire glass with ice.

Because you clearly are. If the glass is full of ice cubes you get less coke, so what's the point in ordering a coke anyway? (Oh, and go to McDonald's next time. You'll get more than one ice cube. Even during winter when it's farking freezing out there. Bastards.)


Erm, you get the exact same amount. I always got the can unless I was in some place like Burger King or McDonalds. Every Doner shop I ate at just give you the can, same with sit down restaurants.
 
2013-07-18 03:21:20 PM  

Caelistis: It's not hard to adjust your body to wildly varying thermal cycles, you just can't be a fatass who sits on their ass all day.


you said "ass" twice.
 
2013-07-18 03:22:41 PM  

amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]


Chalk me up as an American who doesn't use ice in his drinks.

/Because it melts.
//And waters down the drink.
///The furrners got this one right
 
2013-07-18 03:23:01 PM  

Klopfer: cbauer357: teylix: amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]

man when i visited europe last late summer, i missed ice cubes badly. why are those losers stuck in the middle ages? give me my AC and ice cubes any day.

Amen to that! It's damn hard to find an ice cube in Germany. One time, when I got a coke, I was given one ice cube and a room temperature soda.... sigh... The waitress thought I was insane when I explained to her to FILL the entire glass with ice.

Because you clearly are. If the glass is full of ice cubes you get less coke, so what's the point in ordering a coke anyway? (Oh, and go to McDonald's next time. You'll get more than one ice cube. Even during winter when it's farking freezing out there. Bastards.)


Maybe I should have been more clear. I got a glass with one ice cube and a small bottle of soda on the side. I just wanted the darn thing cold. I wasn't being cheated out of the proper amount that was paid for.
 
rka
2013-07-18 03:23:45 PM  

23FPB23: Oh, and here in the US, we're idiots and weaklings because we don't have 3 snowplows and 47 loads of salt for every man, woman and child. And we wreck our cars in wholesale fashion after 15 minutes of sleet.


That's just you Southerners. There are parts of the continental US that get a damn site colder than Ottawa.
 
2013-07-18 03:24:04 PM  
This was the article I referenced earlier.  Thanks for posting it.  There are some interesting engineering challenges for them ahead.
 
2013-07-18 03:24:49 PM  

Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]


I'd hybrid her with vigor and by that I mean I'd penis her until she was disappointed
 
2013-07-18 03:24:57 PM  
Bunch of pansy wankers, whinging about bollocks : it's 96 outside right now (35.6C) and I biked to work. AC in the office can't keep the temperature below 80 right now, but I have a fan for that.

/We now return you to other people bragging about their weather resistance...
 
2013-07-18 03:25:36 PM  

fireclown: Caelistis: It's not hard to adjust your body to wildly varying thermal cycles, you just can't be a fatass who sits on their ass all day.

you said "ass" twice.


I like ass.
 
2013-07-18 03:25:45 PM  
This just in - people are bad at unhanding unexpected weather.

I'd rather have two weeks of 110 degree weather in the US than two weeks of 85 degree weather in the UK.

In the US my house, my car, my office, and every restaurant I went to - had AC.
In the UK nothing has AC, and if it does, it's inadequate AC.
 
2013-07-18 03:26:50 PM  

gameshowhost: ZAZ: A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.

The only thing strange about that was the timing; concrete buckling at the seams is fairly common up here in Wisconsinland.

Here's another fun one:   http://youtu.be/i-zVEq3d8ws


That took place a few miles from my home.
It seems that the new (US 53) road was made with inferior concrete. The older highways were not seeing any buckling.
 
2013-07-18 03:27:30 PM  

DirtyDeadGhostofEbenezerCooke: They can't figure out where to shove in 'u' into 'air conditioning'.


That's the one for me. Thanks
 
2013-07-18 03:27:42 PM  

mama2tnt: abhorrent1: I still disagree that 85 degrees is a heat wave. So they're THEIR excuses are invalid.

/92 here right now

FTFM.
/95 here right now.


96 Here!  Feels like 110 so it says.  Office temperature - 72.
 
2013-07-18 03:31:17 PM  

jvl: ZAZ: Last week, 200 ScotRail services were cancelled or held up because of the heat. In temperatures of 30C (86F) the rails themselves can easily reach 50C.
The UK network uses continuous welded rail as this is safer, stronger and allows trains to travel more quickly over it, Network Rail says.

In Massachusetts commuter rail slows to 30 mph when temperature reaches 90. The state (country?) has not historically been a fan of continuous welded rail. Some has been installed over the past 15 years.

Yet somehow BART in the San Franscico Bay Area (with continuous rails) magically runs at full speed even when temperatures run up to 110F.


Well, I don't know if this is the *only* reason, but there is some important missing information.  What is the average hottest AND LOWEST temperatur in each area, as it is the delta-T that determines the amount of expansion to expect.

Lets say San Fran averages between 50* and 110*, they need to install rails such that the gaps aren't too big at 50* (when fully contracted) and not to small at 110*.  So they need to account for an expansion resulting from a 60* temperature difference.

In Boston, it could be more like 10* and 90*, so they will need to account for expansion resulting from an 80* change.

I imagine having to deal with snow/ice might come into play as well, but I honestly don't know.  In fact I could be totally wrong, there could be compeltely different reasons why one would be fine at 110* and the other would break at 90*...but just ebcause the highest temperature is higher in one place, does not mean that they ahve to worry teh most about thermal expansion.  It is the difference in temperature.
 
2013-07-18 03:31:18 PM  

archbishop: FTA:

just 0.5% of houses and flats in the UK had any kind of air con...the US, where nearly 100 million homes have it
I hate when "journalists"  they do this.  How the hell am I supposed to compare the percent of UK houses to the number of US houses.  This juxtaposition is utterly meaningless without more context.


When I lived in Nagoya, Japan, I thought I could get away with not turning on my air conditioner one night in order to save money (because it was very expensive to run).  I woke up the next morning absolutely drenched in sweat, dizzy and nauseous.  That's when I learned about heat stroke, and how it wasn't a good idea to not have air conditioning when it's 100 degrees with 100% humidity...at night.  I never did that again.
 
2013-07-18 03:31:41 PM  

Valiente: All of Britain is north of 50N. It is moderated by the Gulf Stream into a sort of Goldilocks zone of frequent rains and temperatures in what North Americans would consider a very narrow range of 0-20C. (It was 36C/98F in Toronto yesterday, by contrast, and we are just south of 44N). If the weather starts to swing in accordance with the high latitude, and/or the Gulf Stream moves or ceases, Britain could be Siberia pretty quickly, with France being Southern Siberia, I suppose...or Northern Saskatchewan.



It's kind of incredible how much the Gulf Stream and Mediterranean (as a heat sink) moderate european weather.
I'm currently at 38 degrees, 12' North latutude, and while we may not get meters of snow every winter, we aren't strangers to the cold. Our record low temperature was -27F, and our 24-hour snowfall record is just shy of two feet.

Messina, Italy is as 38 degrees, 11' North latitude, and I doubt it has snowed there in living memory.
 
2013-07-18 03:32:06 PM  

ZAZ: A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.


No one should be allowed to be a civil engineer in the Midwest without planning for expansion. Simple freeze-thaw water expansion cycles require expansion joints!
 
2013-07-18 03:33:53 PM  
I can't believe they have so few swimming pools. What, are they afraid of water? They live on a frekin' Island!

I can understand some swimming in the ocean, but what about learning to swim?

We have 10 here in Pittsburgh, including the Dormont Pool.
 
2013-07-18 03:34:13 PM  
I'd just like to say, it is 102 here today in the Mojave, and I am wearing a suit.

All your lamentations of unbearableness at 89 degrees amuse me.

please, let's hear some more.

/I look for a hoodie under 70
 
2013-07-18 03:35:03 PM  

Mikey1969: coldcuts: "On railways there are traditionally expansion joints, using small gaps in the rail. But once the rail has expanded to fill those gaps you are in trouble.  "

Maybe in the early 1900's.  Modern railways use stretched rails to account for expansion.  I would hope even British rails would account for temps to occasionally go into the high 80s.

Yeah, considering they can have trains in the Sonoran Desert and the Mohave Desert, i'm pretty sure that they can handle temps 30 degrees cooler than those places hit every year.


It doesn't work that way.

You can design rails (and other infrastructure) to handle extremely hot and cold temperatures. But it costs a lot of money to do so. So you design them with the local climate in mind. If it hit -35 in Southern California you would see issues with the infrastructure as it is not designed for such cold temperatures, despite them being common in places where that is normal.
 
2013-07-18 03:35:07 PM  

generallyso: 23FPB23: The point is, if the weather is not what you generally are equipped for, ITS NEWS TO US SO CLIMB BACK IN YOUR FARKING IGLOO AND EAT YOUR GODDAMNED ROAST PEGUIN.

Roast penguin sounds delicious.


www.sim64.co.uk

Recipe: http://www.sim64.co.uk/blog/roast-penguin-recipe/
 
2013-07-18 03:36:06 PM  
redmid17: give me doughnuts: A couple I know took a trip to Wales a few years a go. They reserched the typical sort of weather for Wales in July, and packed accordingly. It was 2006, and right at the beginning of the worst heatwave in a century in three years. Roads were closed because the blacktop softened too much to drive on. Trains were cancelled because the rails were buckling.

But they did get to watch some filming of the Doctor Who Christmas Special.

Summer of 2003 saw London hit 100 F for the first time in recorded history. I was in Germany for the 2003 heat wave. I thought it highly amusing seeing people wear jeans in 95+ degree weather. Didn't see too many Germans under the age of 25-30 wearing shorts, and plenty of Germans my age stuck to wearing pants.


Well once its over 98.6 F you are better off wearing long pants and long sleeves.
 
2013-07-18 03:38:06 PM  

thisiszombocom: London has the same latitude as calgary, and similar to Saskatoon . Seems like it should be colder there


Latitude is just one of a multitude of factors affecting climate.

Look at Vancouver, it is significantly further north and far warmer than Toronto. Or look at anywhere East of the Rockies, it gets cold well south of the border.
 
2013-07-18 03:38:13 PM  

Fatty McFatcheeks: I'd just like to say, it is 102 here today in the Mojave, and I am wearing a suit.

All your lamentations of unbearableness at 89 degrees amuse me.

please, let's hear some more.

/I look for a hoodie under 70


First time I went to Houston was in February. It was around 60 degrees. I was walking around in either a long sleeve T or normal T and some shorts. Everyone else was wearing pants and jackets, and I even saw multiple joggers wearing gear similar to what wrestlers wear when they are trying to make weight at the last minute, sans trash bag.

I found that fairly funny. Then again, I had just left Indy and it had just snowed over a foot. Take the good with the bad I guess.
 
2013-07-18 03:38:23 PM  

Fatty McFatcheeks: I'd just like to say, it is 102 here today in the Mojave, and I am wearing a suit.

All your lamentations of unbearableness at 89 degrees amuse me.

please, let's hear some more.

/I look for a hoodie under 70


Ha, 96* in DC and it "feels like" 115 according to weather.com with our 56% humidity.  I'll trade you this swampy ass-air anyday for some nice dry heat where my sweat will actually cool me off instead of just moistening my undergarments.

/soggy balls
 
2013-07-18 03:38:31 PM  

Klopfer: cbauer357: teylix: amindtat: #11  [www.journeywoman.com image 250x248]

man when i visited europe last late summer, i missed ice cubes badly. why are those losers stuck in the middle ages? give me my AC and ice cubes any day.

Amen to that! It's damn hard to find an ice cube in Germany. One time, when I got a coke, I was given one ice cube and a room temperature soda.... sigh... The waitress thought I was insane when I explained to her to FILL the entire glass with ice.

Because you clearly are. If the glass is full of ice cubes you get less coke, so what's the point in ordering a coke anyway? (Oh, and go to McDonald's next time. You'll get more than one ice cube. Even during winter when it's farking freezing out there. Bastards.)


Coke/Pepsi is 99% water.  The other 1% is ungodly cheap.

In the US - companies purchase large amounts of concentrated syrup that they combine, on demand, with chilled water, ice, and CO2.  It's called a 'Fountain drink'.  Typically, an American will pay $2 USD for such a drink....served in a 20oz (500ml) or larger glass....and it will almost always include unlimited free refills.

Americans are not concerned about the loss of volume due to ice.

For whatever reason - soft-drinks at restaurants cost about a gazillion times more in the EU.

Comparing a place like Eddie Rockets to a place like Steak N Shake works out to Coke being six or seven times as expensive in the EU than in the US.  It boggles my mind.
 
2013-07-18 03:38:42 PM  

Fatty McFatcheeks: I'd just like to say, it is 102 here today in the Mojave, and I am wearing a suit.

All your lamentations of unbearableness at 89 degrees amuse me.

please, let's hear some more.

/I look for a hoodie under 70


over 80 and I'd rather not leave the house, I'll wear shorts in 45 degree weather though, Winter isn't cold until around 20, then I'll defiantly grab a winter coat.
 
2013-07-18 03:38:46 PM  
archbishop: I hate when "journalists"  they do this.  How the hell am I supposed to compare the percent of UK houses to the number of US houses.  This juxtaposition is utterly meaningless without more context.

You use this thing called the "Internet". You might have heard of it.

http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0982.pdf

As of 2010, there were 130,599,000 homes in the USA. Assuming TFA is correct about nearly 100 million homes including A/C (I can't be bothered to check their figures), that's about 77% of US homes being airconditioned.

dittybopper: On the other hand, a couple of window fans (one facing in, one facing out in different rooms) can provide the draft necessary to keep a flat reasonably cool.  In fact, you'd want to do that at night, to get the cool air in, and then button up the flat and close the curtains/shades/blinds during the day to keep it cooler.

You know how I know you've never been in a British house? My parents have a fairly modern, expensive, two-story (plus attic) home in the UK, within an hour of London. Even with every single window in the house open and fans running full-tilt, the insulation that makes that home economical for most of the year works against it to make it almost uninhabitable in these rare heatwaves. (I know, I went through one myself about 15 years ago, and it was so damned uncomfortable indoors that you were better off sitting outside.)

Mikey1969: And "well insulated" doesn't mean that your "flat" will be hotter, otherwise, they wouldn't even bother with insulation in homes in Phoenix. It keeps the cold in, also.

American "well insulated" =/= UK "well insulated".

Also, keeps what cold in, precisely? Did you miss how most UK homes have no A/C, because for the overwhelming majority of the time, most UK homes *need* no A/C?

Valiente: British water heaters tend to work on demand and can be as small as toaster ovens.

What is this I don't even.

Every British house I've ever been in has had a large water heater, and not run it on demand -- because you pay less for the power at night. You have a water heater big enough to get you through the day, perhaps with a separate smaller tank that runs on demand to supplement the stored water if it's getting cool.

/87F here today, wouldn't swap that for 80F in the UK, even if you paid me a hundred bucks for the day.
 
2013-07-18 03:39:18 PM  

Oldiron_79: redmid17: give me doughnuts: A couple I know took a trip to Wales a few years a go. They reserched the typical sort of weather for Wales in July, and packed accordingly. It was 2006, and right at the beginning of the worst heatwave in a century in three years. Roads were closed because the blacktop softened too much to drive on. Trains were cancelled because the rails were buckling.

But they did get to watch some filming of the Doctor Who Christmas Special.

Summer of 2003 saw London hit 100 F for the first time in recorded history. I was in Germany for the 2003 heat wave. I thought it highly amusing seeing people wear jeans in 95+ degree weather. Didn't see too many Germans under the age of 25-30 wearing shorts, and plenty of Germans my age stuck to wearing pants.

Well once its over 98.6 F you are better off wearing long pants and long sleeves.


Not if you're moving. I was the only one who wasn't sweating like a stuck pig.
 
2013-07-18 03:39:40 PM  

dittybopper: Also, the human body can put up with a very high temperatures so long as it stays hydrated properly.


Only if the humidity is sufficiently low.

100+ temps combined with humidities at or above 95% is basically like the zero limit in altitude -- you won't die immediately, but you are dying. At temps above body temperature, high humidity means that sweating stops working -- the air is just as saturated as water you're extruding, so no cooling evaporation is occurring. All that's left is the block body radiation coming off your lungs, which is basically enough to keep up with basal metabolism and the heat you're absorbing from conduction and radiation from your surroundings. before long, your rising temps will overcome you're ability to keep that heat away from the brain. Once that happens, you die.

We're mainly a plains animal -- we do well in dry heat, and can maintain body temps under great exertion, but we're terrible at wet heat thermal control. Ironically, while dog's can't sweat, they do much better with hot+wet because panting works great in that situation.
 
2013-07-18 03:40:36 PM  
aurelientt.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-07-18 03:40:48 PM  
Great. Another thread full of Septics bragging about how they can comfortably fry eggs on their scrotum without breaking sweat.
 
2013-07-18 03:40:55 PM  
I have central air.  I have a generator that will power most of my required house items (fridge, lights, TV) but not the dryer OR the central air.  I have a brand new window unit still in the box, in the basement.  I will NOT spend days and days w/o AC - yep, probably makes me a total wuss but two things are certain:

1) My wife will not be partaking in any kind of "physical fun" activities if she is even a teensy bit too warm.

2) I can not sleep worth a damn anymore if it's not below 70 degree F in the room.

I considered it a $200 insurance policy against a few days of suckage - and I'm OK with that.
 
2013-07-18 03:43:38 PM  

archbishop: FTA:

just 0.5% of houses and flats in the UK had any kind of air con...the US, where nearly 100 million homes have it
I hate when "journalists"  they do this.  How the hell am I supposed to compare the percent of UK houses to the number of US houses.  This juxtaposition is utterly meaningless without more context.


87% of US households, as of 2009.  That is a honking big difference.

Right now, it's 97F outside with a heat index of 101F. It was 86F at 5:30 this morning when I first woke up. I <3 my air conditioner.
 
2013-07-18 03:43:44 PM  

Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?


Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.
 
2013-07-18 03:43:57 PM  

dittybopper: On the other hand, a couple of window fans (one facing in, one facing out in different rooms) can provide the draft necessary to keep a flat reasonably cool.  In fact, you'd want to do that at night, to get the cool air in, and then button up the flat and close the curtains/shades/blinds during the day to keep it cooler.


They actually address that in the article. The heavy insulation typically found in the flats make it very difficult for the heat built up to escape, and the one room orientation makes it difficult to get a proper and effective draft established.
 
2013-07-18 03:47:17 PM  

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: Air Con was a pretty sweet Nic Cage Cage Nic movie.


FTFY
 
2013-07-18 03:48:03 PM  

TheOmni: dittybopper: On the other hand, a couple of window fans (one facing in, one facing out in different rooms) can provide the draft necessary to keep a flat reasonably cool.  In fact, you'd want to do that at night, to get the cool air in, and then button up the flat and close the curtains/shades/blinds during the day to keep it cooler.

They actually address that in the article. The heavy insulation typically found in the flats make it very difficult for the heat built up to escape, and the one room orientation makes it difficult to get a proper and effective draft established.


You can get plenty of airflow with one room.

You do however need windows on more than one wall.
 
2013-07-18 03:48:13 PM  

Russ1642: bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.

Whenever we have foreign visitors in the office (in Edmonton) I'm always disappointed that it isn't -25 C or below. I want them to experience the coldest we have to offer. I don't want them leaving and saying back home "I don't see what all the fuss is about"


At a previous employer we had a bunch of guys coming up from the southern states to Ontario and the repeated question leading up to it was how cold was it going to be in Canada.  It was April or something stupid.  Anyway, we decked out the office reception with snowshoes, snow-shovels, toques, parkas and mitts.

"What are those for?"
"Those are the loaners, in case you come to work without checking the weather and get caught in a snowstorm."
"In April?"
"Wouldn't be the first time."

One guy spent the whole visit wondering if he was going to be snowed in for his return flight.
 
2013-07-18 03:48:28 PM  
101F in North Jersey today...it's not the temp that sucks, it's the humidity. I Think I burned the bottom of my feet on the pavement when I went out to my car before....
 
2013-07-18 03:48:35 PM  
At least the majority of the U.S. has air conditioning.

I refused to join in on that mockery.  Maybe 2 percent of that reason is that I have 5 friends from England showing up to DragonCon and I will not miss it just because the 6 foot 5 member of the group can pick me up and use me like nunchucks.
 
2013-07-18 03:48:57 PM  

Valiente: Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?

Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.


Who cares?  She's hot
 
2013-07-18 03:49:03 PM  

orclover: Just checked outside and it is 90f degrees, which is uncommonly cool for this time of year in the afternoon.  When are ya frickin limeys gonna learn to put ice in yer tea?

/posted while sitting in front of my 30 year old box fan.


Not to mention the lovely rain in Austin yesterday. w00t!!!
 
2013-07-18 03:49:20 PM  

gweilo8888: Also, keeps what cold in, precisely? Did you miss how most UK homes have no A/C, because for the overwhelming majority of the time, most UK homes *need* no A/C?


My point was that just because there's insulation, it doesn't heat the place up. By saying that it keeps the cold in, I was implying that when there is A/C, it's what keeps the cold inside. I should have explained that better. Having less insulation isn't suddenly going to make your house cooler in a (chuckle) "heat wave". Sorry, I only chuckle because for the entire 22 years I lived in Arizona, we were past 88.5 degrees by the beginning of March until somewhere around the end of November. Our railroad tracks, roads, sidewalks, and most importantly, people seemed to do OK.
 
2013-07-18 03:50:21 PM  

thisiszombocom: London has the same latitude as calgary, and similar to Saskatoon . Seems like it should be colder there


the gulf stream, how does it work?

[magnets.jpg]
 
2013-07-18 03:50:43 PM  

Mikey1969: ZAZ: 4. Roads don't handle heat well either

A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.

Sounds like an engineering issue to me. Roads and sidewalks work just fine in such frosty cities as Phoenix and Las Vegas.


Because roads in Arizona are designed for Arizona weather. You install those roads in Wisconsin and they will have serious issues.

It isn't bad engineering, it is them being subjected to conditions they were not engineered to withstand.
 
2013-07-18 03:51:27 PM  
Waaaaaaah!

We have the exact same problems here in NYC and have been handling 100 degrees (110 with humidity) all week just fine. Although admittedly I'm one of those weird people that prefers this weather to anything under 25 degrees.
 
2013-07-18 03:53:56 PM  

DirtyDeadGhostofEbenezerCooke: They can't figure out where to shove in 'u' into 'air conditioning'.


I'm not going to lie. I lol'd
 
2013-07-18 03:56:11 PM  
In Maryland, BGE is our energy supplier. Yesterday and today are "Energy Action Days" (I think that is what it is called) and if you use less energy than "normal" you get a credit. You can also have a thing put on your A/C unit that when demand is high they will cycle your A/C at different percentages (25, 50 75 and 100%) that you choose will give you rebates on your bill. It's not a big deal, you don't lose your A/C completely, but hell, if the electric company is willing to give me money for maybe a few hours of less A/C I'm all over it. The house stays cool when this happens, not as cold, but it is certainly bearable. Keep the ceiling fans going all day, keep the curtains closed and don't turn on the oven and stove and it's all good. Use the outdoor BBQ or just have a nice cool salad instead.
 
2013-07-18 04:01:21 PM  

bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.


I live in Michigan.  Where I live it averages just under 2 meters of snowfall a year.  I think I'd be ok in Hamilton or whatever Toronto suburb you live in.
 
2013-07-18 04:01:30 PM  
I remember watching a BBC series where a middle class family had to live one month traveling through time from the year 1970-2000, I was shocked at the different standards of living between the UK and the US over those time periods.  The 70s were really enlightening.
 
2013-07-18 04:03:11 PM  
Its like 91 with a heat index of 100 here
 
2013-07-18 04:04:13 PM  

dywed88: thisiszombocom: London has the same latitude as calgary, and similar to Saskatoon . Seems like it should be colder there

Latitude is just one of a multitude of factors affecting climate.

Look at Vancouver, it is significantly further north and far warmer than Toronto. Or look at anywhere East of the Rockies, it gets cold well south of the border.


London is well north of Vancouver.

As an example, Juneau, AK and Glasgow are at about the same latitude, and both are near coastal waters. Glasgow's about 7 degrees warmer on average, and has a 30-deg more narrow temperature range.
 
2013-07-18 04:04:57 PM  

potterydove: bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.

I live in Michigan.  Where I live it averages just under 2 meters of snowfall a year.  I think I'd be ok in Hamilton or whatever Toronto suburb you live in.


Heck here in Garrett County, Maryland, we topped 20 feet in the winter of 2010-11 and regularly go over 10 feet. I'd love less than 2 meters in a winter--might be able to fire the snowplow driver who does my driveway and just use a damned shovel.

/Used to think Maryland didn't get serious snow
//Now knows that's just the downstaters.
 
2013-07-18 04:05:51 PM  
pfft! try a 100 degree Texas summer.

/then again I can't handle the north's winters
 
2013-07-18 04:08:42 PM  

The look well prepared to me.



www.soccermusic.net
 
2013-07-18 04:09:52 PM  

new_york_monty: potterydove: bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.

I live in Michigan.  Where I live it averages just under 2 meters of snowfall a year.  I think I'd be ok in Hamilton or whatever Toronto suburb you live in.

Heck here in Garrett County, Maryland, we topped 20 feet in the winter of 2010-11 and regularly go over 10 feet. I'd love less than 2 meters in a winter--might be able to fire the snowplow driver who does my driveway and just use a damned shovel.

/Used to think Maryland didn't get serious snow
//Now knows that's just the downstate


snerk.... we get snow, it's either we get a truckload where the Gov shuts down the major roadways or we get enough to just make a freakin' sloppy mess OR we get the snow storm, then an ice storm, then more snow. I live on a cul-de-sac and we are the red headed step-children of Anne Arundel County and never get plowed out. If it's big time snow, they plow the secondary road and block us with a huge snow bank and there is no other exit available.
 
2013-07-18 04:10:47 PM  

Cosmic_Music: mmagdalene: Real reason: The British are so white you can see their veins and organs through their skin.

Are we now?

[lh6.googleusercontent.com image 506x678]

Thinks not.


For the most part, yes.

The UK is 91% white, and only 2% black.

It's less diverse than  Utah, for fark's sake.
 
2013-07-18 04:14:03 PM  

TheOmni: It's like when we make fun of the southern states for being pretty much completely shut down whenever they get about an inch of snow. There are a variety of reasons why their infrastructure isn't set up to handle snow, and a population with a lack of personal experience handling it also complicates matters.

None of this makes it not hilarious or mockable though.


too true.

Another example is when northern states spend years mocking southern states only to run around screaming like little girls when a hurricane hits.

/that shiat was hilarious.
 
2013-07-18 04:15:26 PM  

cbauer357: new_york_monty: potterydove: bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.

I live in Michigan.  Where I live it averages just under 2 meters of snowfall a year.  I think I'd be ok in Hamilton or whatever Toronto suburb you live in.

Heck here in Garrett County, Maryland, we topped 20 feet in the winter of 2010-11 and regularly go over 10 feet. I'd love less than 2 meters in a winter--might be able to fire the snowplow driver who does my driveway and just use a damned shovel.

/Used to think Maryland didn't get serious snow
//Now knows that's just the downstate

snerk.... we get snow, it's either we get a truckload where the Gov shuts down the major roadways or we get enough to just make a freakin' sloppy mess OR we get the snow storm, then an ice storm, then more snow. I live on a cul-de-sac and we are the red headed step-children of Anne Arundel County and never get plowed out. If it's big time snow, they plow the secondary road and block us with a huge snow bank and there is no other exit available.


How did you make out in Sandy last year? We had something like 95% outages across Garrett with a foot+ of the heaviest snow I've ever seen. Had the power back at my house after a week, and we were the fortunate ones in the county (other than the county seat). I had friends without power for two weeks or so. I'm in a small private development, so our road-care is private, but even our guy couldn't get in for 2 days or so.

I will say, at least around here everyone has snow tires in the winter and most people know how to deal with it. I feel bad for the people who get snowed in who aren't provisioned for it. Around here, we pretty much expect it from Oct to Apr.
 
2013-07-18 04:17:35 PM  

dittybopper: Cosmic_Music: mmagdalene: Real reason: The British are so white you can see their veins and organs through their skin.

Are we now?

[lh6.googleusercontent.com image 506x678]

Thinks not.

For the most part, yes.

The UK is 91% white, and only 2% black.

It's less diverse than  Utah, for fark's sake.



What percentage Ginger? They may also be classified as "clear" or "pale blue."
 
2013-07-18 04:21:34 PM  
It will be difficult for anyone with Dave's Syndrome...

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-18 04:28:37 PM  
Brit, living near Manchester. Suffering. Major heat rash on the backs of both hands and arms, also everything from the knees down has swelled up in the heat.
I am in agony, I can't wear anything on my arms as it hurts. I also have to keep them both heavily moisturised because the blistering hurts like hell.
As for walking, sort of. I feel like I'm walking through thick mud. I can't put them up for too long. I'm drinking plenty of water.
I *HATE* warm weather.

If you in the US have done with the storms you've been experiencing, could you be so kind as to ship a few over, please?
I know I'm not keen on storms, but they're definitely prettier than the locals and endless blue sky. And I might actually stand a better chance of being able to move/not look like an accident victim.
Thanks in advance!
 
2013-07-18 04:32:15 PM  

new_york_monty: cbauer357: new_york_monty: potterydove: bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.

I live in Michigan.  Where I live it averages just under 2 meters of snowfall a year.  I think I'd be ok in Hamilton or whatever Toronto suburb you live in.

Heck here in Garrett County, Maryland, we topped 20 feet in the winter of 2010-11 and regularly go over 10 feet. I'd love less than 2 meters in a winter--might be able to fire the snowplow driver who does my driveway and just use a damned shovel.

/Used to think Maryland didn't get serious snow
//Now knows that's just the downstate

snerk.... we get snow, it's either we get a truckload where the Gov shuts down the major roadways or we get enough to just make a freakin' sloppy mess OR we get the snow storm, then an ice storm, then more snow. I live on a cul-de-sac and we are the red headed step-children of Anne Arundel County and never get plowed out. If it's big time snow, they plow the secondary road and block us with a huge snow bank and there is no other exit available.

How did you make out in Sandy last year? We had something like 95% outages across Garrett with a foot+ of the heaviest snow I've ever seen. Had the power back at my house after a week, and we were the fortunate ones in the county (other than the county seat). I had friends without power for two weeks or so. I'm in a small private development, so our road-care is private, but even our guy couldn't get in for 2 days or so.

I will say, at least around here everyone has snow tires in the winter and most people know how to deal with it. I feel bad for the people who get snowed in who aren't provisioned for it. Around here, we pretty much expect it from Oct to Apr.


We made out fine. I had a surprise party for my hubby's 50th b-day during that time and his cousin came from Germany for it. She had never seen a hurricane. I made her a "certificate of survival" of her first hurricane. It was comical.

I happen to live in a really good area in AA County. All of our power/cable lines are underground. I've lived in this house for 24 years and I can count on one hand, with fingers left over how may times we have lost power/cable/phone service. We did have to have 7 trees in our backyard taken down because of the damage, but we survived pretty well. (Reference, I'm very close to BWI airport). Of course, now that I say that I'm doomed. We currently have storm warnings in place for the rest of the evening with 60mph+ winds expected.

Unless a transformer blows up, we're pretty good.
 
2013-07-18 04:36:12 PM  
cbauer357:

I'll think happy thoughts for you tonight! Good luck with the storminess.
 
2013-07-18 04:37:18 PM  

This text is now purple: dywed88: thisiszombocom: London has the same latitude as calgary, and similar to Saskatoon . Seems like it should be colder there

Latitude is just one of a multitude of factors affecting climate.

Look at Vancouver, it is significantly further north and far warmer than Toronto. Or look at anywhere East of the Rockies, it gets cold well south of the border.

London is well north of Vancouver.

As an example, Juneau, AK and Glasgow are at about the same latitude, and both are near coastal waters. Glasgow's about 7 degrees warmer on average, and has a 30-deg more narrow temperature range.


Presence of what isn't that important (look at Nova Scotia). The location (in reference to the prevailing winds), temperature, and any currents are critical factors and I am sure there are more factors to consider.
 
2013-07-18 04:37:49 PM  
We have already seen 120s in Arizona. Fark you all.
 
2013-07-18 04:39:10 PM  
In an opposite way, Hawaii is such that if during the daytime in downtown Oahu, temperatures dipped below...say...65 degrees for a week, you'd have to shut things down :P
 
2013-07-18 04:40:05 PM  
95 in Minneapolis, feels like 100...

Sometimes I wonder why I live in a state with summer to winter temperature differentials of 140 degrees.....*sigh*
 
2013-07-18 04:40:32 PM  

mmagdalene: Real reason: The British are so white you can see their veins and organs through their skin.


Lol.  London is about as ethnically diverse city as you are likely to find on planet earth.  The anglo's spend a great deal of time out of doors walking (or sadly, smoking) so they are less pale than you might think.

As for the heat, 85 doesn't sound hot unless you've ever been in the tube on a typical summer day and its still hotter than crotch.  I can't imagine what that hellhole must feel like right now.
 
2013-07-18 04:45:32 PM  

archbishop: FTA: just 0.5% of houses and flats in the UK had any kind of air con...the US, where nearly 100 million homes have it

I hate when "journalists"  they do this.  How the hell am I supposed to compare the percent of UK houses to the number of US houses.  This juxtaposition is utterly meaningless without more context.


"http://www.census.gov/housing/ahs/about/faq.html#Q5

How many housing units are there in the United States?

There were 132,419,000 housing units in the United States in 2011. Approximately 114,907,000 were occupied as regular residences and 17,512,000 were vacant or seasonal.
"

Wow. So 100 million out of 132 million is 75% of houses in the US have AC.

Quite a difference in climate.
 
2013-07-18 04:46:48 PM  
If you run the current backwards through a heater it produces cold instead.  Problem solved.

/Sigh.  I really wish it worked that way.
 
2013-07-18 04:50:31 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Valiente: Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?

Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.

Who cares?  She's hot


Exactly

(but if you care  Link )

(article also lists "Number of people worldwide who Google "Is Halle Berry black?": 260 ")
 
2013-07-18 04:50:48 PM  

Rezurok: All I took out of that article:

[news.bbcimg.co.uk image 464x311]

Drinking fountains point straight up in the UK?  Gross.


That's not a drinking fountain, it's a Bidet.
 
2013-07-18 04:52:25 PM  

Mock26: If you run the current backwards through a heater it produces cold instead.  Problem solved.

/Sigh.  I really wish it worked that way.


Take a 5 gallon bucket, some plastic tubing, and ornamental fountain pump, and an electric fan.   Fill bucket with ice and water, run plastic tubing in front of fan sticking both ends in the bucket, hook one end to pump and Ta Da cheap homemade swamp cooler.
 
2013-07-18 04:52:42 PM  
bbsimg.ngfiles.com
 
2013-07-18 04:53:44 PM  

new_york_monty: cbauer357: new_york_monty: potterydove: bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.

I live in Michigan.  Where I live it averages just under 2 meters of snowfall a year.  I think I'd be ok in Hamilton or whatever Toronto suburb you live in.

Heck here in Garrett County, Maryland, we topped 20 feet in the winter of 2010-11 and regularly go over 10 feet. I'd love less than 2 meters in a winter--might be able to fire the snowplow driver who does my driveway and just use a damned shovel.

/Used to think Maryland didn't get serious snow
//Now knows that's just the downstate

snerk.... we get snow, it's either we get a truckload where the Gov shuts down the major roadways or we get enough to just make a freakin' sloppy mess OR we get the snow storm, then an ice storm, then more snow. I live on a cul-de-sac and we are the red headed step-children of Anne Arundel County and never get plowed out. If it's big time snow, they plow the secondary road and block us with a huge snow bank and there is no other exit available.

How did you make out in Sandy last year? We had something like 95% outages across Garrett with a foot+ of the heaviest snow I've ever seen. Had the power back at my house after a week, and we were the fortunate ones in the county (other than the county seat). I had friends without power for two weeks or so. I'm in a small private development, so our road-care is private, but even our guy couldn't get in for 2 days or so.

I will say, at least around here everyone has snow tires in the winter and most people know how to deal with it. I feel bad for the people who get snowed in who aren't provisioned for it. Around here, we pretty much expect it from Oct to Apr.



My folks live in Accident.  Ever since 2010, they've snowbirded the shiat out of there and just dealt with the inevitable damage to the house in the Spring.  The snow was over their roof that winter.  Wisp was actually pretty kick ass.

Between Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Micro-climate Snowstorms, that's one beautiful part of the world that wants to kill every human being that lives there.

/end csb
 
2013-07-18 04:55:57 PM  
I don't like the heat.

I'm in NY, and it's what I call "Dallas hot" right now.
 
2013-07-18 04:56:32 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: I can't believe they have so few swimming pools. What, are they afraid of water? They live on a frekin' Island!


They fear tiny vikings might rape and pillage their homes. And Kelpies, too.
 
2013-07-18 04:58:01 PM  
Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun.
 
2013-07-18 04:59:15 PM  

Prevailing Wind: new_york_monty: cbauer357: new_york_monty: potterydove: bingethinker: It's "only" 84 here in Ottawa, but the humidity is 85%, so it's uncomfortable.

Come visit Canada in January, we'll see who can't handle the temperature.

I live in Michigan.  Where I live it averages just under 2 meters of snowfall a year.  I think I'd be ok in Hamilton or whatever Toronto suburb you live in.

Heck here in Garrett County, Maryland, we topped 20 feet in the winter of 2010-11 and regularly go over 10 feet. I'd love less than 2 meters in a winter--might be able to fire the snowplow driver who does my driveway and just use a damned shovel.

/Used to think Maryland didn't get serious snow
//Now knows that's just the downstate

snerk.... we get snow, it's either we get a truckload where the Gov shuts down the major roadways or we get enough to just make a freakin' sloppy mess OR we get the snow storm, then an ice storm, then more snow. I live on a cul-de-sac and we are the red headed step-children of Anne Arundel County and never get plowed out. If it's big time snow, they plow the secondary road and block us with a huge snow bank and there is no other exit available.

How did you make out in Sandy last year? We had something like 95% outages across Garrett with a foot+ of the heaviest snow I've ever seen. Had the power back at my house after a week, and we were the fortunate ones in the county (other than the county seat). I had friends without power for two weeks or so. I'm in a small private development, so our road-care is private, but even our guy couldn't get in for 2 days or so.

I will say, at least around here everyone has snow tires in the winter and most people know how to deal with it. I feel bad for the people who get snowed in who aren't provisioned for it. Around here, we pretty much expect it from Oct to Apr.


My folks live in Accident.  Ever since 2010, they've snowbirded the shiat out of there and just dealt with the inevitable damage to the house in the Spring.  The ...


Ah yes, Accident (one of my favorite name-origin stories for a town). I'm about twenty minutes or so from there. I would love to do the snowbird thing, unfortunately I work full time in the region, so that's a no-go for me. One day, I'll make this a summer house... until then... well I installed a generator after Sandy, so at least I can make it through the worst of it!

It really is a gorgeous area for about six months out of the years. But it will definitely try to kill you the other six months!
 
2013-07-18 04:59:22 PM  

Tom_Slick: I remember watching a BBC series where a middle class family had to live one month traveling through time from the year 1970-2000, I was shocked at the different standards of living between the UK and the US over those time periods.  The 70s were really enlightening.


Did it resemble the British scenes in National Lampoon's European Vacation?
 
2013-07-18 05:00:29 PM  

CoRrUpTeDbUdGiE: Brit, living near Manchester. Suffering. Major heat rash on the backs of both hands and arms, also everything from the knees down has swelled up in the heat.
I am in agony, I can't wear anything on my arms as it hurts. I also have to keep them both heavily moisturised because the blistering hurts like hell.
As for walking, sort of. I feel like I'm walking through thick mud. I can't put them up for too long. I'm drinking plenty of water.
I *HATE* warm weather.

If you in the US have done with the storms you've been experiencing, could you be so kind as to ship a few over, please?
I know I'm not keen on storms, but they're definitely prettier than the locals and endless blue sky. And I might actually stand a better chance of being able to move/not look like an accident victim.
Thanks in advance!


Sorry. It's been cool and rainy here in Dallas the past 3 days or so (apparently the result of a rare case where the blob of low pressure moved west instead of east), but it's going to warm up today and for the foreseeable future. Supposedly, it is 94F here now (which is pretty pleasant for July, but it's humid as fark because it's been raining). And it will only go up from there. 98 or so over the weekend.

As soon as the heat wrings the humidity out of the air and ground, it'll be normal around here (high 90s, no rain). So maybe you'll get your normal weather back.
 
2013-07-18 05:01:17 PM  

Prevailing Wind: mmagdalene: Real reason: The British are so white you can see their veins and organs through their skin.

Lol.  London is about as ethnically diverse city as you are likely to find on planet earth.  The anglo's spend a great deal of time out of doors walking (or sadly, smoking) so they are less pale than you might think.

As for the heat, 85 doesn't sound hot unless you've ever been in the tube on a typical summer day and its still hotter than crotch.  I can't imagine what that hellhole must feel like right now.


Like Kolkata and twice as smelly.
 
2013-07-18 05:06:12 PM  

CoRrUpTeDbUdGiE: Brit, living near Manchester. Suffering. Major heat rash on the backs of both hands and arms, also everything from the knees down has swelled up in the heat.
I am in agony, I can't wear anything on my arms as it hurts. I also have to keep them both heavily moisturised because the blistering hurts like hell.
As for walking, sort of. I feel like I'm walking through thick mud. I can't put them up for too long. I'm drinking plenty of water.
I *HATE* warm weather.

If you in the US have done with the storms you've been experiencing, could you be so kind as to ship a few over, please?
I know I'm not keen on storms, but they're definitely prettier than the locals and endless blue sky. And I might actually stand a better chance of being able to move/not look like an accident victim.
Thanks in advance!


Former blast furnace worker here...  If it's really heat rash (versus sunburn) and you want rid of it, put a piece of wood or your wallet between your teeth to bite down on and pour rubbing alcohol over the affected area.  Hurts like a sonofabiatch but the heat rash will be dried up and gone in a half hour or so.

It's the only thing I ever found completely effective.

It's also very good for cooling you down, pour the rubbing alcohol on your wrists.  Blood vessels are close to the skin there and the alcohol evaporates rapidly taking a lot of heat out of your system (to the point you can give yourself a chill).  Cold water works too, just not as quickly.
 
2013-07-18 05:06:35 PM  

Gabrielmot: TheOmni: It's like when we make fun of the southern states for being pretty much completely shut down whenever they get about an inch of snow. There are a variety of reasons why their infrastructure isn't set up to handle snow, and a population with a lack of personal experience handling it also complicates matters.

None of this makes it not hilarious or mockable though.

too true.

Another example is when northern states spend years mocking southern states only to run around screaming like little girls when a hurricane hits.

/that shiat was hilarious.


You do realize over 200 people died from that storm right?
 
2013-07-18 05:06:56 PM  

Prevailing Wind: As for the heat, 85 doesn't sound hot unless you've ever been in the tube on a typical summer day and its still hotter than crotch.  I can't imagine what that hellhole must feel like right now.


New York is the same way.  I went there in August and it was like 85 outside and 110 in the subway.

/Boston on the other hand has really, really cold subways.  Dunno why.
 
2013-07-18 05:07:22 PM  

Lollipop165: Waaaaaaah!

We have the exact same problems here in NYC and have been handling 100 degrees (110 with humidity) all week just fine. Although admittedly I'm one of those weird people that prefers this weather to anything under 25 degrees.


Are you serious?  25F (w/o wind) is jeans and barn jacket weather. Freakin' weirdo!
 
2013-07-18 05:07:56 PM  

dabbletech: 11.  Spent all their money on dental care.

[img.mixedmartialarts.com image 310x165]


You know what's funny? The British get a ton of shiat for their teeth yet they have universal health care that includes dentistry work,up to a point of course. At this point that should be an American in that pic.
 
2013-07-18 05:15:35 PM  

Klopfer: ...go to McDonald's next time. You'll get more than one ice cube. Even during winter when it's farking freezing out there....


Decided to try the Sonic breakfast. Ice in the orange juice cup??? I paid more than two farking dollars for it, and when I was finished the cup was still 2/3 full of ice.

/I asked about it when the cup was brought, but was too afraid to send it back. Next time I'll know to order it without ice - or to buy it ANYwhere but Sonic.
 
2013-07-18 05:19:30 PM  
Temperatures have been up to 32 celsius,


32 C? Jesus we had 2 a day soccer (football) practices in 95F (35C) in August. 32C is not hot.


Hell it was 90% humidity and 32C today and I just went on a 5 mile jog, mowed the lawn, cleaned the garage (That is closer to 40C in the afternoon). Last week it was 32C I was sitting out on a locomotive in business casual with no AC, high humidity and a laptop on my lap trying to compile software. Just drink lots of water and you'll be fine.


I grew up in an old farm house. We didn't have AC. There are plenty of people in the south with out AC and our grandparents and older didn't have AC.


Yesterday it was 32C.  While on my run yesterday I saw a 6 month pregnant lady walking the dog on the 1 mile loop in our subdivision. 6 months pregnant walking a dog in 32C heat.
 
Come to the midwest, we've seen it all.


Annual London Weather:

Average highest high: July @74F/23.5C.Average lowest low: Feb @35.8F/2.1CRecords (From Manchester)

Record High: 92.7F (33.7C).

Record Low: 7.7F (-13.5C)

Annual Chicago Weather (1981-2010)

Average highest high, July @84.2F/29C.Average lowest low: Jan @18.2F/-7.7C

Record High: 102 (41C).

Record Low: -27F (-33C)
 
2013-07-18 05:19:34 PM  

give me doughnuts: Valiente: All of Britain is north of 50N. It is moderated by the Gulf Stream into a sort of Goldilocks zone of frequent rains and temperatures in what North Americans would consider a very narrow range of 0-20C. (It was 36C/98F in Toronto yesterday, by contrast, and we are just south of 44N). If the weather starts to swing in accordance with the high latitude, and/or the Gulf Stream moves or ceases, Britain could be Siberia pretty quickly, with France being Southern Siberia, I suppose...or Northern Saskatchewan.


It's kind of incredible how much the Gulf Stream and Mediterranean (as a heat sink) moderate european weather.
I'm currently at 38 degrees, 12' North latutude, and while we may not get meters of snow every winter, we aren't strangers to the cold. Our record low temperature was -27F, and our 24-hour snowfall record is just shy of two feet.

Messina, Italy is as 38 degrees, 11' North latitude, and I doubt it has snowed there in living memory.


We're doing the Continental, unfortunately.
 
2013-07-18 05:30:52 PM  
gweilo8888:

Valiente: British water heaters tend to work on demand and can be as small as toaster ovens.

What is this I don't even.

Every British house I've ever been in has had a large ...


See here, and here, and view this:

upload.wikimedia.org

Not found in the Duke's Palace, perhaps, but very common in student digs, B&Bs and the smaller sort of hostelry. Becoming fairly common here (Canada), even where space is rarely an issue, because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.
 
2013-07-18 05:33:18 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Valiente: Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?

Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.

Who cares?  She's hot


I didn't think that was up for debate. I'd ball her monsterously.
 
2013-07-18 05:35:13 PM  

calufrax: It will be difficult for anyone with Dave's Syndrome...

[24.media.tumblr.com image 438x252]


That guy is the spitting image of my cousin Pete.
 
2013-07-18 05:40:25 PM  

mjjt: Smeggy Smurf: Valiente: Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?

Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.

Who cares?  She's hot

Exactly

(but if you care  Link )

(article also lists "Number of people worldwide who Google "Is Halle Berry black?": 260 ")


Hmm. Apparently, according to that theory, I'm black, which I've always suspected. As have my girlfriends. And despite looking like a tanning-capable Irish football hooligan.

/no he dint.
 
2013-07-18 05:43:21 PM  

Mose: dittybopper:
Also, the human body can put up with a very high temperatures so long as it stays hydrated properly.  Keep the water intake up, and the electrolytes balanced, and you should be fine as long as you don't have any major underlying health issues.

It's uncomfortable, but there is no reason why temperatures in the mid-80s to low 90s should be *FATAL*.

But keeping a human's core temperature in the safe range is heavily dependent on relative humidity since we rely on evaporative cooling.  One can be fully hydrated and still suffer hyperthermia.  90 degrees with a dew point in the 50s could be considerably safer from a hyperthermic standpoint than 84 and a dewpoint of 78.  The latter of which we had in my part of New England about a week ago.  Never seen the dewpoint that high and I hope to never see that again.


We had a high of 95 F and a dew point of 76 F yesterday.  No to tiny bit of breeze, humidity got over 90%.   Freaking hell.  I fainted for the first time since I was in 4th grade (drank plenty of water and Gatorade too, although medication I'm on likely didn't help).  My just moved here from Texas coworker worried that she'd turn into us in a few years.  Good times.

I don't have AC in the house either but dehumidifier/fans/creek and tall trees shading the south side of the house have gotten us through the past two years relatively easily except yesterday.  Holy crap.  Even the flipping basement was hot.

/Michigan
 
2013-07-18 05:48:40 PM  

Valiente: because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.


Um, I get it, and that's definitely a good idea... but my water heater isn't the greatest but doesn't keep water at top temperature unless there's a demand for it.  The water will turn hot relatively quickly during the day - since our weird work schedules mean someone is often awake in the house 9 AM through 2 AM - but at night the heater falls into standby mode.  In the winter I'd stumble out of bed, get up, and wash some dishes using the hot tap - in lukewarm at best water - until the heater kicked in and I could take a properly scalding shower.
 
2013-07-18 05:53:08 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers



Some of us Americans are of English stock.
 
2013-07-18 06:00:06 PM  

darkscout: Temperatures have been up to 32 celsius,
32 C? Jesus we had 2 a day soccer (football) practices in 95F (35C) in August. 32C is not hot.
Hell it was 90% humidity and 32C today and I just went on a 5 mile jog, mowed the lawn, cleaned the garage (That is closer to 40C in the afternoon). Last week it was 32C I was sitting out on a locomotive in business casual with no AC, high humidity and a laptop on my lap trying to compile software. Just drink lots of water and you'll be fine.

I grew up in an old farm house. We didn't have AC. There are plenty of people in the south with out AC and our grandparents and older didn't have AC.


Why, back in MY day....
/Threadjack.
 
2013-07-18 06:00:53 PM  

mama2tnt: Why, back in MY day....
/Threadjack.


I didn't say AC didn't exist. It was just an old farm house that wasn't retrofitted with AC.
 
2013-07-18 06:01:25 PM  

Tom_Slick: Mock26: If you run the current backwards through a heater it produces cold instead.  Problem solved.

/Sigh.  I really wish it worked that way.

Take a 5 gallon bucket, some plastic tubing, and ornamental fountain pump, and an electric fan.   Fill bucket with ice and water, run plastic tubing in front of fan sticking both ends in the bucket, hook one end to pump and Ta Da cheap homemade swamp cooler.


Your ideas are intriguing, and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

I've ran a fan over a stainless steel bowl full of ice before.  Better than nothing, but I've got everything except the ornamental pump here now.  Might give it a go next time around.  Heat's supposed to break tomorrow at least.

trackerbri: At a previous employer we had a bunch of guys coming up from the southern states to Ontario and the repeated question leading up to it was how cold was it going to be in Canada.  It was April or something stupid.  Anyway, we decked out the office reception with snowshoes, snow-shovels, toques, parkas and mitts.

"What are those for?"
"Those are the loaners, in case you come to work without checking the weather and get caught in a snowstorm."
"In April?"
"Wouldn't be the first time."

One guy spent the whole visit wondering if he was going to be snowed in for his return flight.


I got snowbound in Toronto for two days one spring break a few years ago, so getting a kick, etc.

To be fair, IIRC that was March and not April but close enough.  And we get the same stupid questions when we have folks coming to work with us in Michigan from any other state.  I mean.... the internet exists, just look it up, dammit.  And even though we're north of Windsor, it's not like we're Canadian eh.
 
2013-07-18 06:03:48 PM  
i live in Yuma, AZ
complaints about high temperatures always amuse me.
 
2013-07-18 06:05:25 PM  

darkscout: mama2tnt: Why, back in MY day....
/Threadjack.

I didn't say AC didn't exist. It was just an old farm house that wasn't retrofitted with AC.


I lived in an non air conditioned house built in 1860 for a year.  It was considerably cooler than most other non-air-conditioned houses because it was built for that, dammit.  Two large covered porches, and a huge attic for all the heat to flow up to and out of that covered the entire non-porch footprint of the house.  Wood floors and decent sized windows in every room and in the hallways, large trees planted when the house was built (or possibly built around) shading most sides.  If you're in a house built to deal with non AC conditions it makes a world of difference, and I'm willing to wager an old farm house certainly qualified.
 
2013-07-18 06:07:39 PM  

geekasaurus: i live in Yuma, AZ
complaints about high temperatures always amuse me.


Dry heat, etc.

Coworker from AZ was breaking yesterday in MI and mentioned that she'd rather be in Arizona.  Humid enough that even being in the shade really didn't give all that much relief, and it didn't really cool down considerably at night either.
 
2013-07-18 06:12:02 PM  

Mikey1969: gweilo8888: Also, keeps what cold in, precisely? Did you miss how most UK homes have no A/C, because for the overwhelming majority of the time, most UK homes *need* no A/C?

My point was that just because there's insulation, it doesn't heat the place up. By saying that it keeps the cold in, I was implying that when there is A/C, it's what keeps the cold inside. I should have explained that better. Having less insulation isn't suddenly going to make your house cooler in a (chuckle) "heat wave". Sorry, I only chuckle because for the entire 22 years I lived in Arizona, we were past 88.5 degrees by the beginning of March until somewhere around the end of November. Our railroad tracks, roads, sidewalks, and most importantly, people seemed to do OK.


So you missed that 99.5% of British housing lacked any kind of A/C (even bad A/C)? Or you just didn't want to let the facts get in the way of a good snark?

I'm sure Arizona would fall to its knees were it to experience weather conditions it wasn't developed for. And that's precisely the point. Whether you can survive the weather you get every single farking year isn't the issue. It's what happens when you get the rare change in weather.

Your smugness fails to take account of that.

Valiente: gweilo8888:

Valiente: Not found in the Duke's Palace, perhaps, but very common in student digs, B&Bs and the smaller sort of hostelry. Becoming fairly common here (Canada), even where space is rarely an issue, because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.


I'm very familiar with it, and frankly ignoring the cost issue I vastly prefer it. (Well, for gas heat anyway; the electric "instant" water heaters I've used were anything but.)

But I've not used it in the UK, with the sole exception of student digs. (Where they don't give two hoots about cost of living for the tenant, just about getting something that's cheap to repair or replace when it gets broken.) And what you get in B&Bs / hostels bears no relation to what the typical Brit has in their house.

When power is more expensive in the day time than it is at night, using an instant heater is MORE expensive than one which stores the hot water. That's entirely the point. Many of my British relatives aren't terribly well off -- more than a few don't even own a car -- yet they all have storage water heaters that run in the middle of the night only.
 
2013-07-18 06:15:28 PM  

abhorrent1: I still disagree that 85 degrees is a heat wave. So they're excuses are invalid.

/92 here right now


85 is bullshiat and welded rail twisting in that is just an excuse for poor engineering.

/goddam brits still think they have the corner on everything.
 
2013-07-18 06:31:29 PM  
different type of heat. you can't really compare.

i guess we have to mock britain and europe for stuff... lets face it the world is getting fed up of mocking the US... it's not even fun anymore.

one nation under god. yeah come on. even god doesn't want you
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-07-18 07:03:01 PM  

HailRobonia: If only they had windmills to keep them cool.


encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2013-07-18 07:11:09 PM  
Did they add in drinking fountains as a joke?  Who drinks from those disease infested things?
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-07-18 07:20:33 PM  

Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: Valiente: Cavemankiwi: Valiente: Smeggy Smurf: So what they're saying is the Brits are inferior as a species and a tiny bit of variance of climate is killing them?  Hooray evolution!

Americans and our vastly superior genes mock and ridicule the wankers

Hybrid vigour for the win!


[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 276x183]
[www.vibe.com image 718x988]

 Isn't Halle Berry 1/4 English?

Thought she was half-Swedish, half whatever constitutes "American Black", which is at best, variable.

Who cares?  She's hot

I didn't think that was up for debate. I'd ball her monsterously.


"Been there, done that"
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2013-07-18 07:20:55 PM  
1. The design of modern flats The average UK one-bedroom home is a compact 46 sq m (495 sq ft), according to the Royal Institute of British Architects. And as well as being on the small side it's also increasingly very insulated. This can be a good thing when it's cold and damp outside but not always helpful during a heatwave when a nice draught could make all the difference. There are even fears that homes insulated under the government's Green Deal could actually lead to deaths.
============================================================

Why on Earth does no one understand how insulation works? Insulation works to keep heat in AND to keep heat out. It works to keep everything at the same temperature. Not allowing cold or heat in.

The only difference between a house in, say, the UK or Alaska and a House in Texas is that a house in Texas is going to have shades on every non-north facing window (vice-versa for southern hemisphere) while a house in the UK or Alaska is going to have lots of skylights and no blides so as to invite the sun in when it can.

The solution? Buy some window blinds. If you're too cheap for that, tape some blankets or, hell, even paper. Something to reflect the sun away.

When the sun goes down, break out the fan.
 
jvl
2013-07-18 07:24:35 PM  

my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Lets say San Fran averages between 50* and 110*, they need to install rails such that the gaps aren't too big at 50* (when fully contracted) and not to small at 110*.  So they need to account for an expansion resulting from a 60* temperature difference.


SF routinely gets into the mid 20s during winter.
 
2013-07-18 09:38:49 PM  
They should move back into the subway tunnels like ww2. Probably cooler and safe from German bombings.
 
2013-07-18 09:57:59 PM  
"it's also increasingly very insulated.  This can be a good thing when it's cold and damp outside but not always helpful during a heatwave"

Sorry, but no, insulation keeps heat out as well as in. That's why energy efficient windows advertise by shining a heat lamp rather than blowing cold air on them.
 
2013-07-18 10:11:05 PM  
Since Fark has spent the last week wasting greeenlit links, oboviously at the hand of some admin who fancies the Brits (YTISWWT), being concerned as to how hot it is in the UK. Here is one reason to shut the Fark Up about it, Who The F*CK Cares!!!!!
 
2013-07-18 10:11:33 PM  

Valiente: Much of their plumbing runs outside of the house, as many quite functional houses predate the widespread invention of plumbing.


...

No.

You may want to look up the meaning of the word "plumbing", taking into consideration why lead is known as Pb.

And there are many historically, and archaeologically interesting sites and structures within the UK. Settlements going back tens of thousands of years, kind of thing.

Functional houses pre-dating the invention of plumbing (c. a couple of thousand years ago)? Not really.
 
rka
2013-07-18 10:21:37 PM  

ReapTheChaos: "it's also increasingly very insulated.  This can be a good thing when it's cold and damp outside but not always helpful during a heatwave"

Sorry, but no, insulation keeps heat out as well as in. That's why energy efficient windows advertise by shining a heat lamp rather than blowing cold air on them.


Indeed. Have none of these people seen a beer-coozy?

Insulation...keeping my beer cold. Mind Blown.
 
2013-07-18 10:28:15 PM  

Mikey1969: ZAZ: 4. Roads don't handle heat well either

A summer or two ago there was a story about Midwest concrete slabs buckling. One created a ramp and launched a bike.

Sounds like an engineering issue to me. Roads and sidewalks work just fine in such frosty cities as Phoenix and Las Vegas.


You want something that won't turn into a disjointed pile o rock and concrete come spring after a low of -30F? And then get into the comfy heat of 100+? The fact that they don't explode every day of summer is commendable in WI. Last summer was only a surprise because Mother Nature was trolling. Low of 65-high of 105 and humid as balls. Rapid heat changes are much worse than small ones.
 
2013-07-18 10:49:17 PM  
Meh it was 118 here last summer with 100% humidity, sweatily ball weather indeed.
I've seen the asphalt look like pudding it was so hot.

Why do we panic when it snows or ices up? Mountains, and lack of proper equipment to handle it. A snow plow is a road grader and a salt truck is a tractor with a broadcast seeder on the back.
 
2013-07-18 11:34:58 PM  

rka: ReapTheChaos: "it's also increasingly very insulated.  This can be a good thing when it's cold and damp outside but not always helpful during a heatwave"

Sorry, but no, insulation keeps heat out as well as in. That's why energy efficient windows advertise by shining a heat lamp rather than blowing cold air on them.

Indeed. Have none of these people seen a beer-coozy?

Insulation...keeping my beer cold. Mind Blown.


HOW DO THERMOS'  KNOW?
 
2013-07-18 11:58:44 PM  

gweilo8888: Mikey1969: gweilo8888: Also, keeps what cold in, precisely? Did you miss how most UK homes have no A/C, because for the overwhelming majority of the time, most UK homes *need* no A/C?

My point was that just because there's insulation, it doesn't heat the place up. By saying that it keeps the cold in, I was implying that when there is A/C, it's what keeps the cold inside. I should have explained that better. Having less insulation isn't suddenly going to make your house cooler in a (chuckle) "heat wave". Sorry, I only chuckle because for the entire 22 years I lived in Arizona, we were past 88.5 degrees by the beginning of March until somewhere around the end of November. Our railroad tracks, roads, sidewalks, and most importantly, people seemed to do OK.

So you missed that 99.5% of British housing lacked any kind of A/C (even bad A/C)? Or you just didn't want to let the facts get in the way of a good snark?

I'm sure Arizona would fall to its knees were it to experience weather conditions it wasn't developed for. And that's precisely the point. Whether you can survive the weather you get every single farking year isn't the issue. It's what happens when you get the rare change in weather.

Your smugness fails to take account of that.

Valiente: gweilo8888:

Valiente: Not found in the Duke's Palace, perhaps, but very common in student digs, B&Bs and the smaller sort of hostelry. Becoming fairly common here (Canada), even where space is rarely an issue, because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.

I'm very familiar with it, and frankly ignoring the cost issue I vastly prefer it. (Well, for gas heat anyway; the electric "instant" water heaters I've used were anything but.)

gweilo8888: When power is more expensive in the day time than it is at night, using an instant heater is MORE expensive than one which stores the hot water. That's entirely the point. Many of my British relatives aren't terribly well off -- more than a few don't even own a car -- yet they all have storage water heaters that run in the middle of the night only.


I understand and concur completely. Of course, being somewhat antique myself, I recall visits to equally poor (by my middle-class North American standards) to friends and relatives whose heaters, "gas meters" and phones were coin-operated. Strangely, I suspect that was more economical in money, if less economical in time waiting for a couple of miserable gallons to heat up in order to produce a Protestant-grade shower.

Britain in the '80s, despite having better resolution on the TV, better music and even early computers in homes, seemed a bit Dickensian to me in terms of utilities. Do they still have "piss walls" in the older pubs?
 
2013-07-18 11:59:12 PM  
WHOLE HOUSE ATTIC VENT FANS

They will save you a buttload of money on your electrical bill.  My highest electrical bill
last year for an 1100 sq ft house (and this includes an electric stove and water heater)
in SE Michigan, was $90.  And that was in August when it hot and humid as fark like
it is this summer.

i51.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-19 12:02:53 AM  
The average UK one-bedroom home is a compact 46 sq m (495 sq ft),

That there is what their bowing down to their nanny state gets them.  I would seriously farking rebel if the only option was a sub 500 foot space with shared walls.

As for their 10 explanations about why they are pansies about 85°F heat they don't really add up to me.  While I have air conditioning I usually set my thermostat around 82° to minimize the cost. Its at worst mildly warm.  An extra 3° would be uncomfortable but hardly a crisis.  For 15 years I had a unit in a two story 4-plex in San Jose and had no air conditioning.  It regularly hit 85° in the summer and I was just fine. Sometimes I abandoned my bedroom to sleep downstairs but it wouldn't have killed me if I couldn't.

I suspect the explanation is less in the infrastructure and is more likely what the average brit is acclimated to.  Its time for me to put on a somewhat heavy jacket if it drops below 55°F or so but they probably think of that as t-shirt weather.
 
2013-07-19 12:04:03 AM  

Valiente: gweilo8888: Mikey1969: gweilo8888: Also, keeps what cold in, precisely? Did you miss how most UK homes have no A/C, because for the overwhelming majority of the time, most UK homes *need* no A/C?

My point was that just because there's insulation, it doesn't heat the place up. By saying that it keeps the cold in, I was implying that when there is A/C, it's what keeps the cold inside. I should have explained that better. Having less insulation isn't suddenly going to make your house cooler in a (chuckle) "heat wave". Sorry, I only chuckle because for the entire 22 years I lived in Arizona, we were past 88.5 degrees by the beginning of March until somewhere around the end of November. Our railroad tracks, roads, sidewalks, and most importantly, people seemed to do OK.

So you missed that 99.5% of British housing lacked any kind of A/C (even bad A/C)? Or you just didn't want to let the facts get in the way of a good snark?

I'm sure Arizona would fall to its knees were it to experience weather conditions it wasn't developed for. And that's precisely the point. Whether you can survive the weather you get every single farking year isn't the issue. It's what happens when you get the rare change in weather.

Your smugness fails to take account of that.

Valiente: gweilo8888:

Valiente: Not found in the Duke's Palace, perhaps, but very common in student digs, B&Bs and the smaller sort of hostelry. Becoming fairly common here (Canada), even where space is rarely an issue, because it's expensive to keep 40 gallons of water at 150F to supply three five-minute showers and a load of dishes per day.

I'm very familiar with it, and frankly ignoring the cost issue I vastly prefer it. (Well, for gas heat anyway; the electric "instant" water heaters I've used were anything but.)gweilo8888: When power is more expensive in the day time than it is at night, using an instant heater is MORE expensive than one which stores the hot water. That's entirely the point. Many of my British relati ...


Hey piss walls are awesome. I don't have any problems with piss troughs either.
 
2013-07-19 12:05:17 AM  

iron de havilland: Valiente: Much of their plumbing runs outside of the house, as many quite functional houses predate the widespread invention of plumbing.

...

No.

You may want to look up the meaning of the word "plumbing", taking into consideration why lead is known as Pb.

And there are many historically, and archaeologically interesting sites and structures within the UK. Settlements going back tens of thousands of years, kind of thing.

Functional houses pre-dating the invention of plumbing (c. a couple of thousand years ago)? Not really.


Plumbing in the conventional sense left with the Romans and didn't really establish itself in a meaningful way until statisticians sussed up cholera from wells next to cesspits in the 1840s. Many water supply and sewage lines in older British row houses and flats (like where my relatives live) run not to central waste stacks or feeder lines WITHIN the walls (and therefore subject to house heat) but down the exterior walls and are therefore subject to the elements.

That's fine if you remember to shut off and drain them every time it goes below -2C (which is getting increasingly common in Britain), but that's a big if. Retrofitting pre-1860 housing stock for anything other than mains and quarter-inch gas lines was and remains expensive...rolling the dice that a hard frost won't occur in a southern English winter has actually been a pretty good wager.
 
2013-07-19 02:00:45 AM  
85 degrees... that's almost room temperature ffs. Hahahaha...
 
2013-07-19 02:05:26 AM  

tricycleracer: You can get a window shaker in the States for under $200.  How much are they in the old empire?




I've seen them for under $100.

That's a 5000 BTU but it will a.c. one room to escape into.

May only be in the south, or just Florida...
 
2013-07-19 09:04:49 AM  

Ima4nic8or: The average UK one-bedroom home is a compact 46 sq m (495 sq ft),

That there is what their bowing down to their nanny state gets them.  I would seriously farking rebel if the only option was a sub 500 foot space with shared walls.


Population density in the United States:88.6/sq mi (34.2/km2) (179th densest in the world)
Population density in the United Kingdom:  661.9/sq mi (255.6/km2) (51st densest in the world)

Now try and guess why British houses are smaller.
 
2013-07-19 09:39:39 AM  

Ima4nic8or: That there is what their bowing down to their nanny state gets them.  I would seriously farking rebel if the only option was a sub 500 foot space with shared walls.


Do you know what "average' and "one bedroom" mean?

As for Air Conditioning, even if it does not lower the temperature significantly, it will kill the humidity allowing your natural heat reduction to work much better.

Yes the people aren't acclimated, but I am pretty sure that isn't what screws up roads and rails.
 
2013-07-19 11:08:19 AM  
I can really get into this regional schadenfreude thing.  I mean, I'm used to feeling a little pity for those in earthquake zones, but being in the midwest in tornado alley, I got a real kick out of it when that sharknado hit the west coast last week.
 
2013-07-19 04:46:18 PM  

I Ate Shergar: Ima4nic8or: The average UK one-bedroom home is a compact 46 sq m (495 sq ft),

That there is what their bowing down to their nanny state gets them.  I would seriously farking rebel if the only option was a sub 500 foot space with shared walls.

Population density in the United States:88.6/sq mi (34.2/km2) (179th densest in the world)
Population density in the United Kingdom:  661.9/sq mi (255.6/km2) (51st densest in the world)

Now try and guess why British houses are smaller.


It helps to have wide open spaces in Alaska and Montana to bring the average down. The limeys can keep their flats. Jesus, it's like an entire nation of lousy new yorkers explaining they pay a lot for lousy housing to brag they're in the best place on earth.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-07-19 04:59:56 PM  
The figure given for UK population density is very close to the figure for Connecticut.
 
2013-07-19 11:51:08 PM  

ZAZ: The figure given for UK population density is very close to the figure for Connecticut.


Except that of the 3,547,520 acres of land in Connecticut, only 405,616 acres (11.4%) are given over to farmland. That's according to  http://www.workinglandsalliance.org/pages/facts.html, as of 2007.

By contrast, the UK is 70.9% farmland as of 2011 (http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/AG.LND.AGRI.ZS).

So the UK has the same population, but in one third of the land area. (Oversimplification, I know; it would be better to compare developed or better still residental land area, but a quick Google found no figure for that. I strongly doubt Connecticut is going to have as small a residential land area as the UK for its residents, though -- and simple population density is meaningless when almost three quarters of your available land is farmed.)
 
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