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(BBC)   Japanese woman sues yakuza for a refund of her protection money, presumably so she can afford a forklift for her enormous brass balls   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 40
    More: Cool, Yamaguchi, protection money, woman sues, Japan, Shinoda, Japanese, Kyodo News  
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7128 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jul 2013 at 1:21 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-18 01:06:53 PM
What's the Japanese word for chutzpah?
 
2013-07-18 01:21:31 PM
Found her . . .

www.eisinger.net
 
2013-07-18 01:23:10 PM
This woman has balls and creativity, the yakuza should recruit her.
 
2013-07-18 01:25:51 PM
Good, they are leeches.
 
2013-07-18 01:27:12 PM
What was her place not protected?
 
2013-07-18 01:27:22 PM
It actually seems like a brilliant move on the surface... she's too in the spotlight to kill, it draws attention to the gangster problem in Japan, and the mob boss will undoubtedly send people to punish her extortioners for failing to keep things in order and under wraps.

At least for now.  They might revenge kill her a few years later I guess *shrug*.
 
2013-07-18 01:29:11 PM
The Yakuza might install those balls for her if she keeps rocking the boat.
 
2013-07-18 01:30:38 PM
www.deep-focus.com
I hope he pays up.
 
2013-07-18 01:31:58 PM

SmackLT: What's the Japanese word for chutzpah?


Atsukamashi-sa
 
2013-07-18 01:32:31 PM

Alonjar: It actually seems like a brilliant move on the surface... she's too in the spotlight to kill, it draws attention to the gangster problem in Japan, and the mob boss will undoubtedly send people to punish her extortioners for failing to keep things in order and under wraps.

At least for now.  They might revenge kill her a few years later I guess *shrug*.


Take a look at how readily Japanese law enforcement decides deaths aren't suspicious when they don't have a solid chain of evidence that leads back to a specific individual who can be easily prosecuted.
 
2013-07-18 01:35:31 PM

SmackLT: What's the Japanese word for chutzpah?


厚かましい
 
2013-07-18 01:38:41 PM
shrineodreams.files.wordpress.com

Unavailable for comment?
 
2013-07-18 01:39:33 PM
She should try to kill him with a forklift.
 
2013-07-18 01:43:45 PM
It worked for Beulah Mae Donald and Browns & Goldmans.  Why not sue criminals?
 
2013-07-18 01:47:03 PM
Is her hair in curlers and is she wearing a housecoat with a ciggy butt in her mouth?
 
2013-07-18 01:47:41 PM

lack of warmth: It worked for Beulah Mae Donald and Browns & Goldmans.  Why not sue criminals?


We absolutely should sue criminals.  If we had any sense, we'd set up a trustworthy institution to gather voluntary bounty contributions to encourange prosecution.  People involved in proceedings could use that money to relocate or hire security.  The organization could establish safehouses and offer support services.  Criminals could be rated like investments, but in reverse.

Justice is important, and too many people live in fear.  It's totally unnecessary.
 
2013-07-18 01:48:49 PM
I'm no expert or anything, but I recall reading somewhere that the Yakuza operates in Japan pretty openly for a criminal syndicate. They apparently have regional offices that are listed in phonebooks and the like. Given these circumstances, a lawsuit doesn't sound that strange.
 
2013-07-18 01:56:06 PM
Sue the Yakuza?? Why, that's...


images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-07-18 01:58:03 PM

Cagey B: I'm no expert or anything, but I recall reading somewhere that the Yakuza operates in Japan pretty openly for a criminal syndicate. They apparently have regional offices that are listed in phonebooks and the like. Given these circumstances, a lawsuit doesn't sound that strange.


Yep.  The pimps stand right there in the middle of the train station in thin black suits and outrageous hair, texting on their cell phones waiting for clients.  The boss comes in to take a payment or make a delivery.  They roll around in Lincolns wearing ostentatious jewelry.  They own the pachinko parlors and keep them legal.  They own the brothels, which are also legal, and the women stand out in the cold wearing fur coats two blocks from the police station.  (To be fair, everything in urban Japan is two blocks from a police station.)

At least that's how it was ten years ago when I lived in Tokyo and Yokohama.  Plain as can be.
 
2013-07-18 02:04:32 PM
i.imgur.com
What yakuza may look like.
 
2013-07-18 02:08:31 PM

Wangiss: Cagey B: I'm no expert or anything, but I recall reading somewhere that the Yakuza operates in Japan pretty openly for a criminal syndicate. They apparently have regional offices that are listed in phonebooks and the like. Given these circumstances, a lawsuit doesn't sound that strange.

Yep.  The pimps stand right there in the middle of the train station in thin black suits and outrageous hair, texting on their cell phones waiting for clients.  The boss comes in to take a payment or make a delivery.  They roll around in Lincolns wearing ostentatious jewelry.  They own the pachinko parlors and keep them legal.  They own the brothels, which are also legal, and the women stand out in the cold wearing fur coats two blocks from the police station.  (To be fair, everything in urban Japan is two blocks from a police station.)

At least that's how it was ten years ago when I lived in Tokyo and Yokohama.  Plain as can be.


The Yakuza even have offices for business that are pretty much open to the public. Considering how deeply their hooks go into organized labor, into running essentially protection rackets on corporations to prevent shareholder meetings from going crazy, not to mention into entertainment and all sorts of other business, yeah, the Yakuza keep a relatively high profile. It's not just motorcycle gangs and street hoods, it's a whole tiered structure of gangs that have been pretty well established--and in fairness, part of that is because they helped get the nation back on its feet after WWII. The Yakuza were violent nationalists until the regime turned on them in WWII, and MacArthur used their ties in business to rebuild after the war. Not to mention how they smoothed things over for American businesses for contracts.

Suing them is less a death sentence, than it is a bright way to get a pay off to withdraw the suit. It's also an opening for entirely legal retaliation later with their connections within local government, but hey, tax evasion is a way of life in Japan, and if you can't kill someone, you can lawsuit them to death...
 
2013-07-18 02:12:15 PM

Alonjar: It actually seems like a brilliant move on the surface... she's too in the spotlight to kill, it draws attention to the gangster problem in Japan, and the mob boss will undoubtedly send people to punish her extortioners for failing to keep things in order and under wraps.

At least for now.  They might revenge kill her a few years later I guess *shrug*.


They'll subcontract out to the US as drone targeting.
 
2013-07-18 02:22:37 PM
"The former restaurant owner is reported to have paid a total of 10.85m yen ($109,000; £72,000) in protection money over 12 years.
Her lawyers said that when she tried to withhold payments in 2008, a gang member threatened to torch her restaurant, Kyodo reported."

She is failing to understand the basics of the deal. You give us money to protect yourself from US!
 
2013-07-18 02:24:30 PM
Was her business ever burned to the ground?  If not, sounds like she got what she paid for.
 
2013-07-18 02:45:26 PM

jtown: Was her business ever burned to the ground?  If not, sounds like she got what she paid for.


Hey, do you have any idea how expensive it is to do that? You have to bribe the police, fire department, water department, gas company...
 
2013-07-18 03:09:50 PM
My yakuza story:

I used to teach English in Japan.  One of my students worked at a cell phone store.  She said one day, a yakuza thug came into the store, angry that his phone wasn't working and demanded a new phone.  They told him he'd have to pay for it.  This just made him angrier.  He started turning over chairs, throwing display stands, stomping and shouting as loud as he could.  Finally, he left.  The next day, he came back, but this time with his boss, an older man dressed in a suit.  The boss calmly and quietly asked if there was any way to resolve the problem while the thug remained silent the whole time.  They finally worked something out and the guy got a new phone.
 
2013-07-18 03:22:50 PM
Kenichi Shinoda has spent time in jail for killing a rival with a samurai sword

So that's a thing that happened. Sometimes, I'm scared that Japan is exactly as I picture it.
 
2013-07-18 03:22:52 PM

dready zim: "The former restaurant owner is reported to have paid a total of 10.85m yen ($109,000; £72,000) in protection money over 12 years.
Her lawyers said that when she tried to withhold payments in 2008, a gang member threatened to torch her restaurant, Kyodo reported."

She is failing to understand the basics of the deal. You give us money to protect yourself from US!


Must be the other other operation then...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_evboTnP1U4
 
2013-07-18 03:34:41 PM

FatherChaos: My yakuza story:

I used to teach English in Japan.  One of my students worked at a cell phone store.  She said one day, a yakuza thug came into the store, angry that his phone wasn't working and demanded a new phone.  They told him he'd have to pay for it.  This just made him angrier.  He started turning over chairs, throwing display stands, stomping and shouting as loud as he could.  Finally, he left.  The next day, he came back, but this time with his boss, an older man dressed in a suit.  The boss calmly and quietly asked if there was any way to resolve the problem while the thug remained silent the whole time.  They finally worked something out and the guy got a new phone.


Alleged Hypothetical Cool Family Story Bro:

Family members operated a bakery. Two "members" came in and engaged in activity within the "civilian territory". Next day, an older gentleman with authority escorted the two "members" back into the bakery and apologized profusely to the owner. Never had any trouble of that sort again.

/AHCFSB
//there was also the large fruit basket given by the son of the lady next door when my brother-in-law and mother-in-law brought her to the hospital after an accident
 
2013-07-18 03:36:25 PM

OtherLittleGuy:

Alleged Hypothetical Cool Family Story Bro:

Family members operated a bakery. Two "members" came in and engaged in activity within the "civilian territory". Next day, an older gentleman with authority escorted the two "members" back into the bakery and made them apologized profusely to the owner. Never had any trouble of that sort again.

 
2013-07-18 03:40:49 PM

Wangiss: Yep. The pimps stand right there in the middle of the train station in thin black suits and outrageous hair, texting on their cell phones waiting for clients. The boss comes in to take a payment or make a delivery. They roll around in Lincolns wearing ostentatious jewelry. They own the pachinko parlors and keep them legal. They own the brothels, which are also legal,


Yup.
The Yamaguchi-gumi even has a newsletter you can subscribe to.
Interestingly and ironically, a lot of yakuza are ethnically Korean, although you'd never know it from their fervent jingoism.
Also, in keeping with the Japanese aesthetic tradition of elegant monochrome emblems, their gang symbols look really classy.
 
2013-07-18 04:47:47 PM
Heraldry, swordsmanship, and intrigue for 2,500 years... Japan's a pretty kiss-ass country.
 
2013-07-18 05:02:47 PM
"This is believed to be the first lawsuit of its kind in Japan" ... more like the first in the world.

Sooo hope it works and he not only goes to jail for it but has to pay her (then hopefully she gets relocated with her family to a different country :(
 
2013-07-18 05:05:32 PM

Target Builder: Alonjar: It actually seems like a brilliant move on the surface... she's too in the spotlight to kill, it draws attention to the gangster problem in Japan, and the mob boss will undoubtedly send people to punish her extortioners for failing to keep things in order and under wraps.

At least for now.  They might revenge kill her a few years later I guess *shrug*.

Take a look at how readily Japanese law enforcement decides deaths aren't suspicious when they don't have a solid chain of evidence that leads back to a specific individual who can be easily prosecuted.


That's pretty much all police forces ... NONE of them have the resources of those CSI shows (too busy spending money on paramilitary swat teams and spying on pot consumers...)
 
2013-07-18 05:24:49 PM

Langdon_777: Target Builder: Alonjar: It actually seems like a brilliant move on the surface... she's too in the spotlight to kill, it draws attention to the gangster problem in Japan, and the mob boss will undoubtedly send people to punish her extortioners for failing to keep things in order and under wraps.

At least for now.  They might revenge kill her a few years later I guess *shrug*.

Take a look at how readily Japanese law enforcement decides deaths aren't suspicious when they don't have a solid chain of evidence that leads back to a specific individual who can be easily prosecuted.

That's pretty much all police forces ... NONE of them have the resources of those CSI shows (too busy spending money on paramilitary swat teams and spying on pot consumers...)


True, but Japan is especially bad with this. They have over a 99% conviction rate, and much of that comes from only picking cases they know they can win. There are other factors, but that's the most relevant one in this case.
 
2013-07-18 07:02:23 PM

TheOmni: Kenichi Shinoda has spent time in jail for killing a rival with a samurai sword

So that's a thing that happened. Sometimes, I'm scared that Japan is exactly as I picture it.


Guns laws in Japan are really, really strict. Which is why samurai swords and knives are the weapons of choice.
 
2013-07-18 10:14:50 PM
On the surface, this is just an ordinary contract dispute.

She paid for protection.  Did the Yakuza provide her the protection she payed for?  If they did, that is, kept other Yakuza from demanding money from her as well, they provided a service.  So the big area of dispute in the lawsuit amounts to cancellation of their contract.

If the gang member directly threatened to torch her restaurant, he is liable, unless a connection can be established between him and the Yakuza boss(es), who usually go to great lengths to insulate themselves from accusations of criminality.

However, his defense might be that he was giving her fair warning, that if his Yakuza gang discontinued their protection of her restaurant, other gangs would seek to embarrass them by burning the restaurant.
 
2013-07-18 10:16:57 PM
Lol, I wrote kiss-ass, but I meant kick-ass.

/sleepdep
//yeah
 
2013-07-19 03:59:46 AM
Kenichi

Came for the Kenickie/Danny/Grease Lightning reference - leave disappointed
 
2013-07-19 12:14:23 PM
images3.wikia.nocookie.net
They'll kill her five times before she hits the ground...
 
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