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(APS Physics)   COOL: New device can store light for more than a minute. FARK: It's not a lightbulb   (physics.aps.org) divider line 39
    More: Cool, long-term memories, ground states, excited states, quantum information processing, excitations, Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, qubits, quantum computing  
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5400 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Jul 2013 at 1:40 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-18 12:07:52 PM
 
2013-07-18 01:45:09 PM
Time for Hard Light Holograms?
 
2013-07-18 01:45:16 PM
lightbulbs store light?
 
2013-07-18 01:46:37 PM
Dammit!  Felt for sure I'd be the first to get the slow glass reference in with only 2 comments ahead of me.

Well, at least I can leave satisfied.
 
2013-07-18 01:58:23 PM
Awesome. I've been storing my light in old paint cans under the stairs; this looks to be more efficient.
 
2013-07-18 02:00:09 PM
They could put this where the sun don't shine.
 
2013-07-18 02:00:25 PM
Having now attempted to read the article, I have no idea what the end result of this technology is.  Anyone able to dumb it down for me?
 
2013-07-18 02:02:30 PM
I try reading this stuff and feel like an underachiever.

NotARocketScientist: lightbulbs store light?


But I know better than that.
 
2013-07-18 02:06:48 PM

NotARocketScientist: lightbulbs store light?


Well the time it takes to get from the filament to the glass it does.
 
2013-07-18 02:11:39 PM
Isn't this what glow in the dark stuff does?
 
2013-07-18 02:12:48 PM
This isn't just storing light - that's been done to death. This is about storing the coherent state of a photon without breaking down its probability wavefunction.

That is to say, if you were to do a quantum calculation using two photons, you don't want to lose the result by observing the resulting photon destructively. You want to be able to store the probability waveform in memory much like multiple bits are stored now using electrons.
 
2013-07-18 02:15:42 PM

WhippingBoy: Awesome. I've been storing my light in old paint cans under the stairs; this looks to be more efficient.


I've been keeping mine under a bushel.
 
2013-07-18 02:16:56 PM

NotARocketScientist: lightbulbs store light?


Came here to ask that. I think Subby's light bulbs have some issues...
 
2013-07-18 02:23:33 PM
one more step...
 
2013-07-18 02:24:02 PM
I should hope not, since lightbulbs don't store light.
 
2013-07-18 02:25:16 PM

NotARocketScientist: lightbulbs store light?


[morbo]
LIGHTBULBS DO NOT WORK THAT WAY!
[/morbo]
 
2013-07-18 02:31:12 PM
Yes, but what does it MEANNN
 
2013-07-18 02:32:08 PM

A Leaf in Fall: Isn't this what glow in the dark stuff does?


Is that a serious question? If so, no. Glow in the dark stuff stores energy from light and then re-emits it later as a different photon (that's why it's green or whatever instead of the white light you shone on it).
 
2013-07-18 02:32:38 PM

NotARocketScientist: lightbulbs store light?


Yeah.  Didn't you know?  Car engines store power, ovens store heat, and light bulbs store light.  Duh.  Study it out.
 
2013-07-18 02:33:20 PM
Let me just see if I've got this straight...

To stop and retrieve light pulses without destroying their quantum coherence, light coherence needs to be converted into atomic coherences. This can be achieved with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), a quantum interference effect that makes an opaque medium transparent over a narrow spectral range. In EIT, a control laser beam excites atomic systems with two ground spin states connected to an excited state by optically allowed transitions [see Fig. 1(a)]. Through destructive interference, the transition probability between one of the ground states and the excited state (hence the absorption at the corresponding frequency) vanishes. The change of absorption results in a very steep change of refractive index that reduces the group velocity of an incoming light pulse. Light can be slowed down to the point that it comes to a halt: by switching off the control beam when the light is within the sample, the photons can be converted into collective atomic spin excitations (so called spin waves). The spin waves can be stored in the atoms for as long as the coherence between the two spin levels survives, before being converted back into light by turning on the control pulse again. The scheme thus allows the coherent storage and retrieval of light.


Okay, got it.
 
2013-07-18 02:35:36 PM
Anybody else remember an old sci-fi story about a man who sold "slow glass" that had a three-year delay?
 
2013-07-18 02:45:05 PM
Yeah, but can it story heavy?
 
2013-07-18 02:45:56 PM

DirtyDeadGhostofEbenezerCooke: Yeah, but can it story heavy?


...dammit...
 
2013-07-18 02:47:15 PM

Anonymous Bosch: Anybody else remember an old sci-fi story about a man who sold "slow glass" that had a three-year delay?


You mean the very b00bies of this thread?
 
2013-07-18 03:02:12 PM

NotARocketScientist: lightbulbs store light?


No they suck and store dark. Until you shut it off, then they release the dark they have been storing.
 
2013-07-18 03:06:57 PM
I don't really need a glow stick that only lasts a minute.
 
2013-07-18 03:17:20 PM

kmaywfec: I don't really need a glow stick that only lasts a minute.


*facepalm*  Yes, because there's no use to a stepping-stone invention that shows we can beat engineering hurdles.  It must be productized and make money right now, selling at Walmart for $1.99 right out of the gate, or it's utterly useless.

Go back to reading Jughead.
 
2013-07-18 03:19:37 PM

Khellendros: kmaywfec: I don't really need a glow stick that only lasts a minute.

*facepalm*  Yes, because there's no use to a stepping-stone invention that shows we can beat engineering hurdles.  It must be productized and make money right now, selling at Walmart for $1.99 right out of the gate, or it's utterly useless.

Go back to reading Jughead.


I take it your sarcasm detector is broken.
 
2013-07-18 03:22:54 PM

kmaywfec: Khellendros: kmaywfec: I don't really need a glow stick that only lasts a minute.

*facepalm*  Yes, because there's no use to a stepping-stone invention that shows we can beat engineering hurdles.  It must be productized and make money right now, selling at Walmart for $1.99 right out of the gate, or it's utterly useless.

Go back to reading Jughead.

I take it your sarcasm detector is broken.


Apparently so.  My apologies.  I just had two similar (very serious) discussions involving similar discoveries where I got almost identical responses to what you gave.  I think I've hit the science version of Poe's Law.
 
2013-07-18 03:23:50 PM
The last WoT book already covered this.
 
2013-07-18 03:45:09 PM

kmaywfec: I don't really need a glow stick that only lasts a minute.


That's what she said?
 
2013-07-18 03:48:06 PM

Khellendros: kmaywfec: Khellendros: kmaywfec: I don't really need a glow stick that only lasts a minute.

*facepalm*  Yes, because there's no use to a stepping-stone invention that shows we can beat engineering hurdles.  It must be productized and make money right now, selling at Walmart for $1.99 right out of the gate, or it's utterly useless.

Go back to reading Jughead.

I take it your sarcasm detector is broken.

Apparently so.  My apologies.  I just had two similar (very serious) discussions involving similar discoveries where I got almost identical responses to what you gave.  I think I've hit the science version of Poe's Law.


That's just sad.  I'd hope that those people don't hang out on the Fark Geek tab.
 
2013-07-18 03:55:09 PM

kmaywfec: That's just sad. I'd hope that those people don't hang out on the Fark Geek tab.


From time to time, yes.  You'll get the "what's the point?" and "that's not practical!" type responses pretty regularly, but nothing as bad as the conversations I had this week.  I'm glad that seems to be fairly rare on Fark these days.

Again, my apologies for the snarky response.  My sarcasm detector has been thrown out of alignment by ignorant chucklefarks.
 
2013-07-18 04:29:08 PM
So now no more hype about born on dates for my light beer?
 
2013-07-18 05:04:24 PM

NotARocketScientist: lightbulbs store light?


Well no but don't let the imbeciles know you know something they did not care to find out about themselves.
 
2013-07-18 05:52:06 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-07-18 06:40:30 PM

Khellendros: kmaywfec: That's just sad. I'd hope that those people don't hang out on the Fark Geek tab.

From time to time, yes.  You'll get the "what's the point?" and "that's not practical!" type responses pretty regularly, but nothing as bad as the conversations I had this week.  I'm glad that seems to be fairly rare on Fark these days.

Again, my apologies for the snarky response.  My sarcasm detector has been thrown out of alignment by ignorant chucklefarks.


You need to turn it around on them and IRL troll your detractors.

it really is a kind of performance art. Getting people to start speaking againstheir own argument, then slamming them with ttheir own argument.

not going to edit my phones attempt to edit... you get the idea
 
2013-07-18 09:35:49 PM

Hector Remarkable: Let me just see if I've got this straight...

To stop and retrieve light pulses without destroying their quantum coherence, light coherence needs to be converted into atomic coherences. This can be achieved with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), a quantum interference effect that makes an opaque medium transparent over a narrow spectral range. In EIT, a control laser beam excites atomic systems with two ground spin states connected to an excited state by optically allowed transitions [see Fig. 1(a)]. Through destructive interference, the transition probability between one of the ground states and the excited state (hence the absorption at the corresponding frequency) vanishes. The change of absorption results in a very steep change of refractive index that reduces the group velocity of an incoming light pulse. Light can be slowed down to the point that it comes to a halt: by switching off the control beam when the light is within the sample, the photons can be converted into collective atomic spin excitations (so called spin waves). The spin waves can be stored in the atoms for as long as the coherence between the two spin levels survives, before being converted back into light by turning on the control pulse again. The scheme thus allows the coherent storage and retrieval of light.


Okay, got it.


it's like lasing a stick of dynamite
 
2013-07-19 03:59:48 AM

maniacbastard: No they suck and store dark. Until you shut it off, then they release the dark they have been storing.


Close but you got the last part wrong, they never release their dark. Otherwise they would never get full of dark, this is what most people mean when they said a light blew out.

Also shadows are not where a light source gets blocked, its actually blocking the dark absorber that creates the shadow.
 
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