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(SimplyInfo)   Highly radioactive "black stuff" found around Eastern Japan may be Fukushima Nuclear Fuel   (simplyinfo.org) divider line 37
    More: Followup, Fukushima Nuclear Fuel, Japan, Fukushima Daiichi, spent fuel  
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7040 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jul 2013 at 1:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-17 11:29:01 AM
Or godzilla shiat.
 
2013-07-17 11:33:08 AM

dittybopper: Or godzilla kaiju shiat.


www.blastr.com
 
2013-07-17 11:46:12 AM
You're just profiling it 'cause it's wearing a hoodie.
 
2013-07-17 11:55:10 AM
The cork came out.


i218.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-17 12:12:55 PM
Mulder would like a word with you.
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-17 12:16:07 PM
I had a boss who made coffee in one of those metal urns on Monday morning and drank off that pot all week. By Friday, it could crawl out of the pot on it's own.  It could have made it as far as Japan.
 
2013-07-17 12:19:02 PM
img.gawkerassets.com
 
2013-07-17 01:06:52 PM
i785.photobucket.com

Hey, when ya gotta go, ya gotta go...
 
2013-07-17 01:07:38 PM
Everybody else has one, when our we going to get ours?

Inside Japan's nuclear exclusion zone

blogs.channel4.com

blogs.channel4.com

Where should we put it?
 
2013-07-17 01:09:52 PM
www.hdcharacterwallpaper.com
 
2013-07-17 01:12:07 PM

neversubmit: Everybody else has one, when our we going to get ours?

Inside Japan's nuclear exclusion zone





Where should we put it?


Florida
Arizona
New Jersey
 
2013-07-17 01:12:47 PM
depletedcranium.com
 
2013-07-17 01:15:21 PM
The presence of titanium and lead is surprising; I'm not used to seeing either of those in the actual fuel assemblies because titanium is too expensive and difficult to work and lead has too low a melting point.  Sure, lead is used in shielding and all, but not the fuel.  Co-60 is not a fission fragment AFAIK because it is too low in mass, instead it is found in plant systems that have cobalt steel valve seats in which the microscopic wear particles become activated as they flow through the neutron flux in the core.

Also, since radioactivity is a quantifiable property, it would be reasonable to state the dose rate, activity or contamination levels of these "black stuff" hot spots.  I mean, if it isn't too much to ask.
 
2013-07-17 01:16:21 PM
Seems legit
 
2013-07-17 01:22:06 PM

factoryconnection: The presence of titanium and lead is surprising; I'm not used to seeing either of those in the actual fuel assemblies because titanium is too expensive and difficult to work and lead has too low a melting point.  Sure, lead is used in shielding and all, but not the fuel.  Co-60 is not a fission fragment AFAIK because it is too low in mass, instead it is found in plant systems that have cobalt steel valve seats in which the microscopic wear particles become activated as they flow through the neutron flux in the core.

Also, since radioactivity is a quantifiable property, it would be reasonable to state the dose rate, activity or contamination levels of these "black stuff" hot spots.  I mean, if it isn't too much to ask.


I was thinking the same thing, but didn't want to seem ignorant. All my material science/nuclear physics stuff was a while back. I'm in the range where if the energies aren't > 100GeV, I'm not interested
 
2013-07-17 01:25:20 PM

Ned Stark: neversubmit: Everybody else has one, when our we going to get ours?

Inside Japan's nuclear exclusion zone

Where should we put it?

Florida
Arizona
New Jersey


New Jersey - there might be one there now, how could we tell?

Arizona - no one would care not even the people "living" there.

Florida - after the PB disaster, don't you think they have taken enough crap?

How about Arkansas, I live here and it would give me one more thing to complain about. Complaining is the only thing keeping me alive.
 
2013-07-17 01:26:57 PM

Ned Stark: neversubmit: Everybody else has one, when our we going to get ours?

Inside Japan's nuclear exclusion zone

Where should we put it?

Florida
Arizona
New Jersey


detroit!
 
2013-07-17 01:36:15 PM
Damn, over in one.
 
2013-07-17 01:43:02 PM
soy sauce

/John dies in the end.
 
2013-07-17 01:44:45 PM
Nibbler Poop!
 
2013-07-17 01:46:57 PM
If it were fuel, it'd be radioactive as hell, likely self heating still, and be mostly uranium, plutonium, cesium,m strontium, and a few other things (maybe zirconium and boron in there)

From the 'analysis' shown in the article, it ain't fuel.

/also, the 'sources' of the analysis are well-known anti nuke groups.
 
2013-07-17 02:41:53 PM

PsychoPhil: If it were fuel, it'd be radioactive as hell, likely self heating still, and be mostly uranium, plutonium, cesium,m strontium, and a few other things (maybe zirconium and boron in there)

From the 'analysis' shown in the article, it ain't fuel.

/also, the 'sources' of the analysis are well-known anti nuke groups.


That there was no Zirconium or Uranium pretty much screams "not fuel."  It could be micro-debris from the outer containment building or even airborne coolant vapor that got wind-blown or hydrogen-blown across the countryside but it isn't fuel.
 
2013-07-17 03:06:01 PM
www.startrek.com
 
2013-07-17 03:26:18 PM

Latinwolf: Damn, over in one.


I would say 2. At least a strong contender
 
2013-07-17 03:37:40 PM
 Do you think it could be bits of electrical components that were burned? Lead from solder, and odd
rare earths that were from the components. That would explain the lead and maybe some of the odd elements from things that were were either irradiated or burned together as things went crazy..
 
2013-07-17 03:46:38 PM
Thought Manny Ramirez left Japanese leagues?
 
2013-07-17 04:29:17 PM

neversubmit: Everybody else has one, when our we going to get ours?

Inside Japan's nuclear exclusion zone





Where should we put it?


We got one already, it's called Hanford.

/only they don't really exclude people, kinda odd.
 
2013-07-17 04:49:41 PM

Mr. Shabooboo: Do you think it could be bits of electrical components that were burned? Lead from solder, and odd
rare earths that were from the components. That would explain the lead and maybe some of the odd elements from things that were were either irradiated or burned together as things went crazy..


The actual paper:   https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B3fFCVXEJlbvbTFUdWFoekRhaDQ/edit

Sounds like its difficult to say.  It's a small amount of radioactive dust.  Where it came from is anyone's guess.  I'd venture it relates to one of those explosions that blew the top off the spent fuel pools and the subsequent steam off in those pools exposed to the atmosphere.  Some damaged piece of equipment perhaps.

But it could be from any number of things.
 
2013-07-17 05:00:18 PM
goodmoviesbadmovies.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-07-17 05:10:39 PM
It's the residue of a failed attempt to summon Godzilla!
 
2013-07-17 05:10:40 PM

TheDirtyNacho: But it could be from any number of things.


Not saying it isn't, but one thing to remember is that nuclear reactors are far from the only source of radioactive materials.  Besides the unevenly distributed natural stuff, hospitals routinely have relatively huge stocks, and I'd be surprised if the tsunami didn't hit at least one.
 
2013-07-17 05:57:02 PM

Firethorn: TheDirtyNacho: But it could be from any number of things.

Not saying it isn't, but one thing to remember is that nuclear reactors are far from the only source of radioactive materials.  Besides the unevenly distributed natural stuff, hospitals routinely have relatively huge stocks, and I'd be surprised if the tsunami didn't hit at least one.


The tsunami also hit massive chemical refineries, and other industrial plants. Sources are often used in industrial facilities to check paper and plastic thickness.

That said, if this is fuel, why don't they have an actual damn spectrometer graph? We should be able to see uranium on that readout, U235 and U238. If nothing else the high amount of lead has given me pause, as you generally don't put that kind of attenuator into fuel.

/the silver, however, is a more realistic
//silver-indium-cadmium alloys
 
2013-07-17 06:31:14 PM

Ringshadow: Firethorn: TheDirtyNacho: But it could be from any number of things.

Not saying it isn't, but one thing to remember is that nuclear reactors are far from the only source of radioactive materials.  Besides the unevenly distributed natural stuff, hospitals routinely have relatively huge stocks, and I'd be surprised if the tsunami didn't hit at least one.

The tsunami also hit massive chemical refineries, and other industrial plants. Sources are often used in industrial facilities to check paper and plastic thickness.

That said, if this is fuel, why don't they have an actual damn spectrometer graph? We should be able to see uranium on that readout, U235 and U238. If nothing else the high amount of lead has given me pause, as you generally don't put that kind of attenuator into fuel.

/the silver, however, is a more realistic
//silver-indium-cadmium alloys



Yeah I thought about that.  There were some long burning chemical plant fires after the earthquake, an instrument with a source could easily have gone up in flames.

I also wonder how prevalent things like this are in general.  If you drove a sensitive detector around every street in a major city, who knows what interesting things you might find in some of the gutters...
 
2013-07-17 06:47:25 PM

TheDirtyNacho: I also wonder how prevalent things like this are in general. If you drove a sensitive detector around every street in a major city, who knows what interesting things you might find in some of the gutters...


I remember reading about somebody who made a good living for a while collecting gold dust and such up from in front of/around a block of gold jewelry places.  enough gold was dropped into the gutters that while it was time intensive to collect, allowed the guy to make a decent living.

And yeah, part of the problem is that we normally don't have good 'before and after' studies
 
2013-07-17 07:30:40 PM

TheDirtyNacho: Yeah I thought about that.  There were some long burning chemical plant fires after the earthquake, an instrument with a source could easily have gone up in flames.

I also wonder how prevalent things like this are in general.  If you drove a sensitive detector around every street in a major city, who knows what interesting things you might find in some of the gutters...


That happened in Japan after the events. Turned it out was old radium bottles.
 
2013-07-18 12:06:27 AM
Let's hope it doesn't reach Monster Island.
 
2013-07-18 03:56:44 PM

PsychoPhil: If it were fuel, it'd be radioactive as hell, likely self heating still, and be mostly uranium, plutonium, cesium,m strontium, and a few other things (maybe zirconium and boron in there)

From the 'analysis' shown in the article, it ain't fuel.

/also, the 'sources' of the analysis are well-known anti nuke groups.


Unfortunately the pro-nuke groups haven't exactly covered themselves with glory on this one.

/a tsunami following an earthquake is "unforseeable"
/ORLY?
 
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