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(The New York Times)   Dementia rates drop sharply on news that it's being misdiagnosed as something else now   (nytimes.com) divider line 63
    More: Interesting, dementia rates, Rand Corporation, Alzheimer's Association, dementia  
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5250 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jul 2013 at 3:42 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-16 03:38:03 PM
www.labspaces.net
 
2013-07-16 03:44:40 PM
FTFA "And experts on aging say the studies confirmed something they long suspected but lacked good evidence to prove: that dementia rates would fall and mental acuity improve as the population grew healthier and better educated."

So much for the Tea Party dying off.
 
2013-07-16 03:49:35 PM
Not so cool story bro: Worked at a 7-11 in my teen years in Toronto; one day this 80 year old lady came stumbling into the store wearing just her nightie (how's that for a mental polaroid?) drooling and mumbling to herself. Shied away from anyone who came near her, then fell down in the corner by the coolers. Tried to help her and wouldn't respond at first until she suddenly screamed out "CALL THE POLIIIIIIIIIIIIIIICE!!!".

So that's what I did. Mental illness is a scary thing.
 
2013-07-16 03:51:25 PM
I may have Alzheimer's...but at least I don't have Alzheimer's.
 
2013-07-16 03:53:31 PM
How can you tell if a tea partier has dementia?
 
2013-07-16 03:55:26 PM

vudukungfu: How can you tell if a tea partier has dementia?


Titty sprinkles?
 
2013-07-16 03:56:40 PM
How are orderlies going to find sexual partners in this kind of environment?
 
2013-07-16 03:57:07 PM
What did I come in here to post again?
 
2013-07-16 03:57:54 PM

gopher321: So that's what I did. Mental illness is a scary thing.


I've seen my 86 year old neighbour slowly deteriorate over the last few years and it's really sad to watch. Several weekends ago she told me that her husband would pop by to help me find a publisher for my new book. I'm not writing a book and her husband has been dead for nearly 35 years.
 
2013-07-16 03:58:05 PM
My grandmother suffered dementia before she died. Horrible way to go. She could do some things, continued to crochet, but couldn't remember anyone

.

meat0918: FTFA "And experts on aging say the studies confirmed something they long suspected but lacked good evidence to prove: that dementia rates would fall and mental acuity improve as the population grew healthier and better educated."

So much for the Tea Party dying off.


If it falls for those that are healthier and smarter, then we should be safe.
 
2013-07-16 03:58:22 PM
images1.wikia.nocookie.net

It's on the mend.
 
2013-07-16 03:58:39 PM
I once worked at a small city "news" paper.
An elderly lady used to call the newsroom at night every now and then and ask what time it was.
When we'd tell her, she would ask us if that was morning or night.
 
2013-07-16 04:00:01 PM
Dementia rates drop sharply on news that it's being misdiagnosed as something else now

Conservatism?
 
2013-07-16 04:00:06 PM
What dementia looks like...

img199.imageshack.us
 
2013-07-16 04:01:24 PM
Dementia is a sad thing, unless it's a 100 year old grandma asking how your dick is hanging.
 
2013-07-16 04:01:39 PM
Going to link this  NSFW word but relevant.

/hates the banhammer
 
2013-07-16 04:01:39 PM

vudukungfu: How can you tell if a tea partier has dementia?


They say something completely reasonable?
 
2013-07-16 04:01:52 PM
It's about f*cking time those Obama Death Panels kicked it.
 
2013-07-16 04:06:07 PM

miss diminutive: I've seen my 86 year old neighbour slowly deteriorate over the last few years and it's really sad to watch. Several weekends ago she told me that her husband would pop by to help me find a publisher for my new book. I'm not writing a book and her husband has been dead for nearly 35 years.


My grandmother showed signs like that.  Having to tell her that my grandfather was dead over and over again was heartbreaking.  Eventually we stopped telling her.
 
2013-07-16 04:07:59 PM
Well, why wouldn't the rate of dementia decline? There have been great advances in medicine here in the year 3025.
 
2013-07-16 04:09:14 PM
What amazed me was the percentage of dementia patients is less than 10%.  Based on the sad cases I have been seeing lately, I would have sworn it was closer to 45%.  I guess I need to stay away from all the old folks I know, I must be giving it to them.
 
2013-07-16 04:10:50 PM

mike_d85: What did I come in here to post again?


Be happy, Be patient.
I used to walk into a room  and "what did I come in here for???" would strike.
Not anymore, now I forget why I stood up before leaving a room.

/got a lil' notebook on the sly, but,,, lost it
 
2013-07-16 04:18:19 PM

mike_d85: miss diminutive: I've seen my 86 year old neighbour slowly deteriorate over the last few years and it's really sad to watch. Several weekends ago she told me that her husband would pop by to help me find a publisher for my new book. I'm not writing a book and her husband has been dead for nearly 35 years.

My grandmother showed signs like that.  Having to tell her that my grandfather was dead over and over again was heartbreaking.  Eventually we stopped telling her.


My great grandma (she raised me from birth until I was 10) went through this. She was Ukrainian but spoke English. By the end, she would shakily write letters to her husband in the war. After she reached a certain point, she never spoke or wrote English again. Those letters were pretty awful to read. We always told her we sent the letters.
 
2013-07-16 04:29:01 PM

cowgirl toffee: What dementia looks like...


Damn you. I feel bad for laughing that hard.
 
2013-07-16 04:38:12 PM

megarian: mike_d85: miss diminutive: I've seen my 86 year old neighbour slowly deteriorate over the last few years and it's really sad to watch. Several weekends ago she told me that her husband would pop by to help me find a publisher for my new book. I'm not writing a book and her husband has been dead for nearly 35 years.

My grandmother showed signs like that.  Having to tell her that my grandfather was dead over and over again was heartbreaking.  Eventually we stopped telling her.

My great grandma (she raised me from birth until I was 10) went through this. She was Ukrainian but spoke English. By the end, she would shakily write letters to her husband in the war. After she reached a certain point, she never spoke or wrote English again. Those letters were pretty awful to read. We always told her we sent the letters.


Well, there's my heartbreaking read for the day.

I really hope that by the time I reach my 80s medical science will have a much greater understanding of the human brain and the science of aging so that I don't just drift away in a sea of confusion and old memories.
 
2013-07-16 04:38:35 PM
So, pretty much better educated = 'had more money', right?  So those with better diets, with better health care and who had a higher earning potential due to their education were mentally healthier in old age... Who'da thunk it?
 
2013-07-16 04:41:28 PM

Peepeye: cowgirl toffee: What dementia looks like...

Damn you. I feel bad for laughing that hard.


And, you are welcome. :D
 
2013-07-16 04:52:39 PM
Making fun of dementia and Alzheimers is cool.

I also like making fun of autism and aspergers, but for some strange reason that almost seems to be frowned upon here.
 
2013-07-16 04:56:39 PM

I Like Shiny Things: Making fun of dementia and Alzheimers is cool.

I also like making fun of autism and aspergers, but for some strange reason that almost seems to be frowned upon here.


I make fun of Alzheimer's because I am absolutely terrified of it, and it helps me deal with the prospect of potentially dealing with it later in life.

My paternal grandfather had it, and my maternal grandmother is currently dealing with it.

Knowing you knew something, but also knowing you have a slowly progressing disease that will eventually make you forget you forgot and even that you have something wrong with you, and then you die.
 

Just shoot me, it'd be quicker and more painless.
 
2013-07-16 04:57:42 PM

I Like Shiny Things: Making fun of dementia and Alzheimers is cool.

I also like making fun of autism and aspergers, but for some strange reason that almost seems to be frowned upon here.


Artistic ass burgers make me smile.
 
2013-07-16 04:58:35 PM
Another recent study, conducted in Denmark, found that people in their 90s who were given a standard test of mental ability in 2010 scored substantially better than people who reached their 90s a decade earlier.

Mainly because people who reached their 90s a decade earlier are mostly dead now.

/Alzheimer's is in my family
//that's fun to look forward to.
 
2013-07-16 05:05:06 PM
Fortunately my great grandma was whip-sharp until the day she died. Her physical health
deteriorated, but mentally she was still there. She lived to the ripe old age of 94. She was
living in an ACLF at that time - a very nice, privately owned one - and one July afternoon
the owners were having a BBQ at their home for all the residents. My Nona declined and
said she wanted to just stay home and rest. She slipped away during her nap, peacefully,
and hopefully dreaming of nice things.

She was the coolest lady I've ever known. I hope I'm just like her when I grow up.
 
2013-07-16 05:07:15 PM

Unoriginal_Username: My grandmother suffered dementia before she died. Horrible way to go. She could do some things, continued to crochet, but couldn't remember anyone


I have this mental image of this 45 foot long crocheted sock. Or a sweater with socks for arms.
 
2013-07-16 05:12:37 PM
I've been reading a little about nootropics/smart drugs and am considering an experimentation with aniracetam but thats beside my point. My point is that these drugs were created to help with afflcitions of the brain, but are not available as perscriptions in US though legally sold online, and prescribed in other countries. Anyhow, what prescriptive drugs are being used to treat or mitigate or slow the effects of these brain diseases?
 
2013-07-16 05:12:41 PM

darth_badger: I Like Shiny Things: Making fun of dementia and Alzheimers is cool.

I also like making fun of autism and aspergers, but for some strange reason that almost seems to be frowned upon here.

Artistic ass burgers make me smile.


I'll buy an artistic ass burger with ass pennies
 
2013-07-16 05:15:28 PM

miss diminutive: gopher321: So that's what I did. Mental illness is a scary thing.

I've seen my 86 year old neighbour slowly deteriorate over the last few years and it's really sad to watch. Several weekends ago she told me that her husband would pop by to help me find a publisher for my new book. I'm not writing a book and her husband has been dead for nearly 35 years.


Well, if he shows up, you'll have a hell of a book.
 
2013-07-16 05:16:25 PM
Well they didn't actually drop sharply, the researchers just forgot where they put the survey..
 
2013-07-16 05:16:39 PM

miss diminutive: gopher321: So that's what I did. Mental illness is a scary thing.

I've seen my 86 year old neighbour slowly deteriorate over the last few years and it's really sad to watch. Several weekends ago she told me that her husband would pop by to help me find a publisher for my new book. I'm not writing a book and her husband has been dead for nearly 35 years.


Just nod your head and thank her; sometimes that's the best thing you can do for old people.

My granny was deeply religious; but, in the last 8 months of her life, she was too frail to go. She'd get very upset if she didn't go; but, she never remembered what day it was or conversations you just had with her; so, we'd tell her that she went, just to make her happy.
 
2013-07-16 05:18:15 PM

miss diminutive: I really hope that by the time I reach my 80s medical science will have a much greater understanding of the human brain and the science of aging so that I don't just drift away in a sea of confusion and old memories.


Making a tea from this will cure dementia.

www.britannica.com
 
2013-07-16 05:18:53 PM

cherryl taggart: What amazed me was the percentage of dementia patients is less than 10%.  Based on the sad cases I have been seeing lately, I would have sworn it was closer to 45%.  I guess I need to stay away from all the old folks I know, I must be giving it to them.


Do you frequent to politics tab? That would explain a lot.
 
2013-07-16 05:19:45 PM
Maybe the decline has to do with the regulation and elimination of industrial poisons such as leaded gasoline.
 
2013-07-16 05:32:07 PM

megarian: mike_d85: miss diminutive: I've seen my 86 year old neighbour slowly deteriorate over the last few years and it's really sad to watch. Several weekends ago she told me that her husband would pop by to help me find a publisher for my new book. I'm not writing a book and her husband has been dead for nearly 35 years.

My grandmother showed signs like that.  Having to tell her that my grandfather was dead over and over again was heartbreaking.  Eventually we stopped telling her.

My great grandma (she raised me from birth until I was 10) went through this. She was Ukrainian but spoke English. By the end, she would shakily write letters to her husband in the war. After she reached a certain point, she never spoke or wrote English again. Those letters were pretty awful to read. We always told her we sent the letters.


When my great grandma started to go, I could taste it in her cooking. It just wasn't the same anymore, and she deteriorated pretty fast after that. She died at 96, but was mentally sharp until only the last year or two.

My grandma on the other side of the family though had her mind go slowly over many years (and was a terrible cook to begin with). At one point she'd pretty much forgotten who everyone was and thought she was a teenager again. I was talking with her once and she started telling me how handsome she thought I was, and literally said, "Hey, do you to come over to my house with me tomorrow and see my stamp collection? My parents won't be home..." /wink

Awkward!
 
2013-07-16 05:47:37 PM

mongbiohazard: My grandma on the other side of the family though had her mind go slowly over many years (and was a terrible cook to begin with). At one point she'd pretty much forgotten who everyone was and thought she was a teenager again. I was talking with her once and she started telling me how handsome she thought I was, and literally said, "Hey, do you to come over to my house with me tomorrow and see my stamp collection? My parents won't be home..." /wink


Cool story, bro/grandpa!
 
2013-07-16 05:54:22 PM

mike_d85: My grandmother showed signs like that.  Having to tell her that my grandfather was dead over and over again was heartbreaking.  Eventually we stopped telling her.


It's generally recommended that you don't, it stresses them out unnecessarily. Tell them once, but if they keep forgetting, don't tell them again. Just tell them the person they're asking about is somewhere else, but that they will see them soon.
 
2013-07-16 06:21:39 PM

This text is now purple: miss diminutive: I really hope that by the time I reach my 80s medical science will have a much greater understanding of the human brain and the science of aging so that I don't just drift away in a sea of confusion and old memories.

Making a tea from this will cure dementia.

[www.britannica.com image 432x324]


No it won't. That's wild carrot, aka Queen Anne's Lace, aka chiggerweed, and a tea made from it is about as effective as beating the Alzheimer's out of somebody.
 
2013-07-16 06:23:09 PM
I'm probably going to get dementia eventually; it runs in the family, and I'm trying to figure out a strategy not to be afraid of it. Because that's the really bad part; people with dementia are often terrified.
 
2013-07-16 06:36:37 PM
Change the reporting and everything's jake, right? Right,  M-DSPD Chief Hurley ?
 
2013-07-16 06:49:57 PM
Got a great grandmother still kicking at 95. She still lives on her own and manges an apartment building. Granted she has lots of family and well wishers to help her out. But considering her husband died back in 06 its pretty impressive.

my grandmother on my moms side is 80 has alzheimers and is getting worse every day. Didnt know who her husband was the other day.

Really is a shame as there was a solid 5 years where she was the only stable influence in my life.
without her for sure I wouldve been dead or in jail a long time ago.
 
2013-07-16 06:50:20 PM

mbillips: I'm probably going to get dementia eventually; it runs in the family, and I'm trying to figure out a strategy not to be afraid of it. Because that's the really bad part; people with dementia are often terrified.


My coping mechanism (my grandmother's mind was ravaged by Alzheimer's for years before she passed) is the certain knowledge that if I haven't died for some other reason by the time it comes for me, then I'll do the job myself.
 
2013-07-16 08:07:47 PM
My dad had alzheimers. He was diagnosed when he was about 70 but we knew for a few years before that things weren't right. He lived for five and a half years after diagnosis. It was heartbreaking to see what caring for him did to my mom; it just about killed her. I did as much as I could. You haven't lived until you've changed your parents diaper. At the end he didn't know my or his wife of 55 year's name. He's been gone 10 years and it still makes me cry to tell his story.

Mom on the other hand has had a rennaisance. She is very active at 85, church, Weight Watchers(!), her woman's group. Healthy and health conscious. Mentally sharp, too. I dread losing her.

Alzheimers sucks worse than just about anything.
 
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