Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CNN)   Australia's biggest winery to pour $30 million worth of wine down the drain because Americans just aren't drinking enough of the cheap stuff. Farkers: Challenge Accepted   (money.cnn.com ) divider line
    More: Sad, Australians, Americans, vineyards, excess capacity  
•       •       •

2715 clicks; posted to Business » on 16 Jul 2013 at 11:37 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



127 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-07-16 10:13:26 PM  

fastbow: Hey wine experts, what's a good way to learn about wine without spending a lot of money?


Wikipedia. You can know all there is to know without ever having to sample a drop.

/I sometimes consider it might be worth paying the $200 a glass to try a notable Grange Hermitage vintage.
 
2013-07-16 10:18:23 PM  

SomethingToDo: fastbow: Hey wine experts, what's a good way to learn about wine without spending a lot of money?

Wikipedia. You can know all there is to know without ever having to sample a drop.

/I sometimes consider it might be worth paying the $200 a glass to try a notable Grange Hermitage vintage.


Where do I start? Wikipedia's got one of the same problem as the liquor store: there's so damn much of it.
 
2013-07-16 10:19:35 PM  

Nuclear Monk: Sooo...would you say you have a drinking problem?


In the fact that I'm not drinking ENOUGH.
 
2013-07-16 10:22:06 PM  

fastbow: SomethingToDo: fastbow: Hey wine experts, what's a good way to learn about wine without spending a lot of money?

Wikipedia. You can know all there is to know without ever having to sample a drop.

/I sometimes consider it might be worth paying the $200 a glass to try a notable Grange Hermitage vintage.

Where do I start? Wikipedia's got one of the same problem as the liquor store: there's so damn much of it.


Buy one of Jancis Robinson's books.
Go to wine tastings at grocery stores, wine bars, and restaurants.
 
2013-07-16 10:26:08 PM  
Thanks FrancoFile. I'll hit up Amazon.

Hey, since you're an expert, any recommendations for Texas wines? I prefer to go local when I can. Kansas too. Born there and still have some hometown pride.
 
2013-07-16 11:34:31 PM  

fastbow: Hey wine experts, what's a good way to learn about wine without spending a lot of money?


Go to wineries and taste.  If its not a trendy area, it will likely be free or a very nominal charge.  Even in northern California, there are still plenty of wineries that for free,  And talk to the people who are pouring - they are usually more than happy to talk about wine as long as it isn't super busy.

Of course, this is a lot easier if you live on the west coast or the great lakes region, not so much if you're in Montana or something.
 
2013-07-16 11:36:16 PM  

OptionC: fastbow: Hey wine experts, what's a good way to learn about wine without spending a lot of money?

Go to wineries and taste.  If its not a trendy area, it will likely be free or a very nominal charge.  Even in northern California, there are still plenty of wineries that for free,  And talk to the people who are pouring - they are usually more than happy to talk about wine as long as it isn't super busy.

Of course, this is a lot easier if you live on the west coast or the great lakes region, not so much if you're in Montana or something.


Central Texas, so who knows...
 
2013-07-16 11:57:33 PM  
There are good european firms (family) that'll send a years product to become vinegar or fuel ethanol if the crop didn't produce a quality product.

If it won't go to primary market, recover what you can.
 
2013-07-17 12:05:41 AM  

Stone Meadow: FrancoFile: Satanic_Hamster: I_Am_Weasel: For example,Black Stump Bordeaux is rightly praised as a peppermint flavoured Burgundy, whilst a good Sydney Syrup can rank with any of the world's best sugary wines.Of the sparkling wines, the most famous is Perth Pink. This is a bottle with a message in, and the message is 'beware'. This is not a wine for drinking, this is a wine for laying down and avoiding.

If it's from Australia, it's not a Bordeaux.

My guest bedroom:
[i58.photobucket.com image 850x637]

One side of my cellar.  I have a max capacity of about 1200 bottles.

[farm4.staticflickr.com image 500x374]

Amateurs...my personal cellar at BevMo is always fully stocked.
[images.onset.freedom.com image 600x450]


A piffle compared to my stash:

bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com
 
2013-07-17 12:30:33 AM  

fastbow: Hey wine experts, what's a good way to learn about wine without spending a lot of money?


I'm more of a wine hobbyist, but the basics are in the wine tasting wheel (it's a round chart that breaks down the tastes and aromas for you). Then learning which wines should come from which regions. Your ultimate goal is to learn food pairings. Local liquor stores and wineries have tastings, I also found a community education course in my area that taught the above info. I don't think there's a way to learn wines without tasting. There's also a homebrew club in my area, but that's different than wine appreciation.

/food pairing also works with beer.
 
2013-07-17 02:34:32 AM  
I_Am_Weasel: ... Wogga Wogga, which has a bouquet like an aborigine's armpit.

Wagga Wagga.
 
2013-07-17 03:45:38 AM  

proteus_b: NkThrasher: ...When you can food the acidity of the thing being canned is part of what decides what needs to be done to make it safe for what period of time depending on how it's stored.

What's desireable? pH neutral?


the same concept also applies to wine...generally, more acidic wine (within reason) is less prone to the negative effects of aging. More acid takes longer to break down; eventually any wine will lose its all of its tannic acids, at which point it will have a flat feel on your palate. Alcohol content and sugar content can also factor into age-ability, though this interaction is much more complex due to the abundance of cheap sweet wines that skew any direct correlation. Good sweet wines (sauternes, ports, rieslings, etc) age most gracefully.
 
2013-07-17 04:39:59 AM  
Who let any of our precious alcohol leave our shores ? But I totally agree with pouring it down the drain instead of letting Yanks drink it.
 
2013-07-17 06:42:02 AM  

gfid: The least they could do is donate it to homeless shelters


Penfold's? That's just cruel.
 
2013-07-17 06:47:29 AM  

fastbow: OptionC: fastbow: Hey wine experts, what's a good way to learn about wine without spending a lot of money?

Go to wineries and taste.  If its not a trendy area, it will likely be free or a very nominal charge.  Even in northern California, there are still plenty of wineries that for free,  And talk to the people who are pouring - they are usually more than happy to talk about wine as long as it isn't super busy.

Of course, this is a lot easier if you live on the west coast or the great lakes region, not so much if you're in Montana or something.

Central Texas, so who knows...


One thing I learned from the French wine shop down the street is that you want the grapes to suffer (for lack of a better term). That's why some wine from non arid parts of eastern WA are crap.

So in central Texas you might get some good grapes with the withering sunlight and clay like soil. Except you don't get cold winters. Probably best to try a lot of different ones :)
 
2013-07-17 07:29:07 AM  
Probably the best Aussie wines I had were the ones from small vintages that were never going to be shipped out of the country owing to economics. (I was fortunate enough some years ago to spend some time down under and was introduced to a bunch of boutique wineries.) Many of those that make it here to the US just are not as appealing to me, partly because my tolerances have changed -- can't drink reds any more without a massive headache after -- but they also just don't taste as good as other wines I can get my hands on.

The eastern end of Long Island has a thriving local wine industry, and while they have a ways to go before they challenge California wines, they can be quite drinkable for not too much money. Just about every vineyard has a tasting room for you to try whatever you like. And combined with all the farm stands that pop up in the fall, a day trip on the weekend is a great way to unwind and pick up some good food and drink for home.
 
2013-07-17 08:01:12 AM  

fastbow: Thanks FrancoFile. I'll hit up Amazon.

Hey, since you're an expert, any recommendations for Texas wines? I prefer to go local when I can. Kansas too. Born there and still have some hometown pride.


Been a while since I was in TX, so no particular advice.

I actually had some nice non-vintage dry Riesling from Oklahoma a few years ago, Tres Sueños.
Gruet from Albuquerque is world-class stuff - sparkling wines and still Pinot Noir.

I'm sending you email from my wine consulting & writing account in the next hour w/ some additional info.
 
2013-07-17 08:02:33 AM  

fastbow: Hey wine experts, what's a good way to learn about wine without spending a lot of money?


I'm going to assume you're from the US.  Pick one region (Sonoma, Napa, Willamette Valley, Columbia Valley, etc).  Look up a map and get an idea of the lay of the land, ie where the wineries and vineyards are.  Then go to your local wine merchant and begin buying wines from that region, and that region only.  Stick to named varietals (Cabernet, Merlot, Zinfandel, Chardonnay, etc)... not blends.  Buy wine by the mixed case (you usually get a 10-15% discount).  Start drinking.  As you open and try bottles, use wikipedia to study up on the varietal and region.  Read the winery website descriptions of their bottles.  Google search, use cellartracker.com, etc to find other tasting notes and opinions.

It will seem tedious at first.  You'll want to try wine from all over.  Resist that urge at first until you have some building blocks and feel comfortable with the differences between varietals.  Then pick a second region and repeat.  Pretty soon (a year or so) you'll be able to feel pretty good in a wine shop or at a restaurant looking over a wine list.  You'll have a feel for what's out there, how they pair with food, and most importantly what YOU like.

Some things to understand (very basics)... different regions excel at different varietals.  For example, don't go hunting for Columbia Valley Pinot Noir or Zinfandel.  Don't expect many good cabs from Willamette Valley.  Each region has specific growing conditions that work best for different wines.

Sonoma, IMHO, is the best place to start.  Very diverse region, many sub regions (appellations) to immerse yourself into, and they can grow pretty much anything.  Prices are much better than Napa too, and readily available.

This won't be a cheap endeavor, but it doesn't have to break the bank.  A couple of bottles / week at $10-20/each is probably a good price point to start with.  The case discount is your friend!  If you have Costco they have good prices and good selections (no case discount at Costco, though).

If you have questions along the way, EIP.
 
2013-07-17 08:50:58 AM  

alywa: This won't be a cheap endeavor, but it doesn't have to break the bank.  A couple of bottles / week at $10-20/each is probably a good price point to start with.  The case discount is your friend!  If you have Costco they have good prices and good selections (no case discount at Costco, though).


my other half hates me.  She, and all her other hen-ny friends are all into wine and for the life of me, I cannot taste or appreciate the difference between areas. I get the basics down and generally prefer one variety (Cab, pinot, etc) with a certain meal but she'l hand me a glass to try and more often than not, take a sip and go 'Yep, tastes like wine'
 
2013-07-17 10:27:09 AM  

o5iiawah: my other half hates me.  She, and all her other hen-ny friends are all into wine and for the life of me, I cannot taste or appreciate the difference between areas. I get the basics down and generally prefer one variety (Cab, pinot, etc) with a certain meal but she'l hand me a glass to try and more often than not, take a sip and go 'Yep, tastes like wine'


Have you tried doing tastings of the same varietal from different regions.  Comparison is very nice when trying to figure out differences from one to the next.

I guess there are people out there for whom wine just isn't a 'thing', but I really can't imagine what that must be like.  Wine is just such a critical part of a meal to me.  My father, who really enjoys wine too, recently had to undergo a series of chemo and radiation which has left him with a much altered / damaged palate.  Wine (and many previously enjoyed food) tastes terrible to him now, which is really sad for both of us.
 
2013-07-17 10:51:42 AM  
Sure, those are nice enough stashes for the beginner. Check out my personal cellar if you want to get serious:

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-07-17 10:55:53 AM  
Roughly 1 million bottles at a cost of 32 million USD.  Means we're talking about $32 a bottle. This isn't cheap stuff

Unless this is cop math and they priced it based on a single glass in a restaurant.
 
2013-07-17 11:28:34 AM  

fastbow: Central Texas, so who knows...


Specs!

Generally, I buy both online and at Specs.  I generally will buy one or two bottles of something to try it.  If I really like it I'll get a full case.  Try to buy things with reviews/points/awards.  If it's from a winery that I have already tried and like I'm much more likely to give it a go.
 
2013-07-17 11:41:06 AM  

alywa: Have you tried doing tastings of the same varietal from different regions


They taste different but not to the point where any one would be memorable, or I could recall it at a later point.    Take Cabs for instance.  There's bold ones and there's mild ones.  There's fruity ones and more dry ones.  I can generally tell which are which I just dont prefer one or the other

i guess you could say i can taste the difference between a chicken cutlet and a porkchop but it doesn't matter because I prefer fish.

I do the same with the craft beer craze.  If presented with 100 choices, the ones I choose become less memorable and not enjoyable. i have a few standbys with wine, scotch and beer and rarely deviate.  I find it fascinating that someone can be a database of wine...
 
2013-07-17 11:57:32 AM  

o5iiawah: alywa: Have you tried doing tastings of the same varietal from different regions

They taste different but not to the point where any one would be memorable, or I could recall it at a later point.    Take Cabs for instance.  There's bold ones and there's mild ones.  There's fruity ones and more dry ones.  I can generally tell which are which I just dont prefer one or the other

i guess you could say i can taste the difference between a chicken cutlet and a porkchop but it doesn't matter because I prefer fish.

I do the same with the craft beer craze.  If presented with 100 choices, the ones I choose become less memorable and not enjoyable. i have a few standbys with wine, scotch and beer and rarely deviate.  I find it fascinating that someone can be a database of wine...


It's what you're interested in and what gives you pleasure.  What do you do a lot of?
Watch baseball? You know who the opposite field hitters are, and you can tell when the outfield adjusted properly.
Watch movies?  You know the name of that character actor that's in all those buddy comedies.
Listen to music?  You can tell the difference between songs recorded live during the 2008 tour vs the 2011 tour.
 
2013-07-17 12:59:11 PM  

o5iiawah: I find it fascinating that someone can be a database of wine...


My son has perfect pitch... I can't carry a note in a bucket nor tell a B from a C.  Probably just something some of us are born with, enjoy, and refine.  Bottom line, drink what you like and don't sweat it otherwise.
 
2013-07-17 06:32:58 PM  
And now's the time to point out that almost all of it is American wine from American grapes.
 
Displayed 27 of 127 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report