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(CNN)   Australia's biggest winery to pour $30 million worth of wine down the drain because Americans just aren't drinking enough of the cheap stuff. Farkers: Challenge Accepted   (money.cnn.com) divider line 127
    More: Sad, Australians, Americans, vineyards, excess capacity  
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2711 clicks; posted to Business » on 16 Jul 2013 at 11:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-16 11:27:37 AM
*whine*
 
2013-07-16 11:32:17 AM
It's an old Irish belief that your admittance to heaven after you die is dependant on one thing:  When you reach the Pearly Gates you are suspended head first in a barrel filled with all the alcohol you've ever spilled or wasted in your life.  And if you drown?  Well then, to hell with you.


Something tells me the CEO of Treasury wines is in BIG trouble in the afterlife
 
2013-07-16 11:38:40 AM
Overpriced roo urine

/we got Two Buck Chuck
 
2013-07-16 11:41:13 AM
It's true!  Americans just don't appreciate a good Australian wine.

  A lot of people in this country pooh-pooh Australian table wines. This is a pity as many fine Australian wines appeal not only to the Australian palate but also to the cognoscenti of United States.

 For example,Black Stump Bordeaux is rightly praised as a peppermint flavoured Burgundy, whilst a good Sydney Syrup can rank with any of the world's best sugary wines.Of the sparkling wines, the most famous is Perth Pink. This is a bottle with a message in, and the message is 'beware'. This is not a wine for drinking, this is a wine for laying down and avoiding.

Another good fighting wine is Melbourne Old-and-Yellow, which is particularly heavy and should be used only for hand-to-hand combat.Quite the reverse is true of Château Chunder, which is an appellation contrôlée, specially grown for those keen on regurgitation; a fine wine which really opens up the sluices at both ends.Real emetic fans will also go for a Hobart Muddy, and a prize winning Cuivre Reserve Château Bottled Nuit San Wogga Wogga, which has a bouquet like an aborigine's armpit.
 
2013-07-16 11:53:03 AM
I've tried several Australian wines and did not like them.  (all less than $10)  Not fond of most from the USA either.
I'll stick with Spanish and South American (Chile, Argentina) brands.

/more of a beer & bourbon drinker
 
2013-07-16 11:53:18 AM
Bring us some fresh wine! The freshest you've got - this year! No more of this old stuff.
 
2013-07-16 12:02:03 PM
if it is that YellowTail crap, good riddance

/bleech
 
2013-07-16 12:07:39 PM
But Australia's on the other side of the world. So if they pour it down their drains there, it will flow up, to us!
 
2013-07-16 12:09:44 PM

I_Am_Weasel: It's true!  Americans just don't appreciate a good Australian wine.


The wife and I stockpile Woop Woop Shiraz when it shows up in our local booze stores.  Partly because we love the name 'Woop Woop' and an Aussie friend of ours confirmed it means "Out in the middle of nowhere".  Also, it's tasty.
 
2013-07-16 12:11:11 PM
perhaps a wine snob can inform us as to why the wines were spoiling, when i thought that many highly coveted wines were kept for years with no detriment to their quality?

/but i guess my ignorance is what is expected from someone who doesn't consider 30 dollar per bottle wine "cheap"
 
2013-07-16 12:21:23 PM

proteus_b: perhaps a wine snob can inform us as to why the wines were spoiling, when i thought that many highly coveted wines were kept for years with no detriment to their quality?

/but i guess my ignorance is what is expected from someone who doesn't consider 30 dollar per bottle wine "cheap"


Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life.  Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux   can age for decades.   Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled.  In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry.   In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.
 
2013-07-16 12:25:01 PM
The Australian wine industry (ie the big 4 that produce 80% of their wine) screwed themselves.

They emphasized the cheap (<$10) stuff, and didn't put any effort into marketing the other price points.
Then when the quality in Argentina and Chile caught up, and the relative currency values made the South American stuff marginally cheaper, the Australians didn't have anywhere to go.  They couldn't cut prices on the cheap stuff without losing money, and they couldn't raise prices on the cheap-but-good because they had drilled it into Josephine Consumer's head that Australia=cheap.

The independent producers that started at $15-$20 price points and volumes of less than 30k cases/year are doing ok, but the big boys are hurting.  They actually published a plan to be the world's #1 wine producer in 20 years, outproducing France and Italy.  Good luck with that, mates.
 
2013-07-16 12:26:24 PM

proteus_b: perhaps a wine snob can inform us as to why the wines were spoiling, when i thought that many highly coveted wines were kept for years with no detriment to their quality?

/but i guess my ignorance is what is expected from someone who doesn't consider 30 dollar per bottle wine "cheap"


Pulling things out of my ass from a few areas of food preservation that aren't wine...

...When you can food the acidity of the thing being canned is part of what decides what needs to be done to make it safe for what period of time depending on how it's stored.  Straight up diced tomatoes need some added lemon juice to be safe to put in a glass jar at room temperature for more than a few weeks, or they need to be canned in a pressure cooker to be safe for longer, or they need to be stored cold.  So this wine may not be in a chemical state that is stable for long periods of time based on the way it was bottled, whereas other wines that are intended to be aged for long periods of time may be.

...The fact that it's stored in a warehouse instead of some underground cave might matter.  Temperature fluctuations matter a lot for beer, you want it to go through as few cold/warm transitions as possible, that warehouse may not do a very good job of preventing such transitions, so the wine may have gone through too many.

...It may just not be wine that is capable of keeping for long because it wasn't treated to avoid things that happen at Bottle Time + 3 years or whatever.  Why waste time and effort making wine resistant to aging problems if you expect it to be sold within a year?
 
2013-07-16 12:36:24 PM

NkThrasher: I_Am_Weasel: It's true!  Americans just don't appreciate a good Australian wine.

The wife and I stockpile Woop Woop Shiraz when it shows up in our local booze stores.  Partly because we love the name 'Woop Woop' and an Aussie friend of ours confirmed it means "Out in the middle of nowhere".  Also, it's tasty.


images.smh.com.au

Approve.
 
2013-07-16 12:47:13 PM

Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life. Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux can age for decades. Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled. In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry. In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.


That sounds quite plausible, but nonetheless, when people boast of having a "Chateau de Chacery, 1954", the understanding is that it was bottled in that year. Also, do you know <i> why </i> aging in a cask is different than aging in a bottle?
 
2013-07-16 12:49:54 PM
They should just raise the price. It'll sell better.
 
2013-07-16 12:50:39 PM

NkThrasher: ...When you can food the acidity of the thing being canned is part of what decides what needs to be done to make it safe for what period of time depending on how it's stored.


What's desireable? pH neutral?
 
2013-07-16 12:53:26 PM
Australian wine hit a high in the late 1990's / early 2000's with collectors as the Grateful Palate portfolio came online.  Previously unknown producers entered the market with huge wines... big, in your face fruit bombs that were unlike anything else out there.  Noon.  Fox Creek.  Torbreck.  Duetchke.  Parker loved 'em... 95-100 point scores were common.

Problem is... the wines don't age well (Except the Torbrecks in my experience).  They don't go well with food.  Coupled with a tanking worldwide economy in 2007, the Australian wine market hit hard times.  Tastes had moved on, especially as Aussie prices increased.

Newer wines coming out of Australia are less Parkerized... still undoubtedly new world, but definitely more refined.  That said they don't have much of a place in my collection as for the price they have a hard time keeping up with IMO much better wines from Italy, Spain and Portugal.
 
2013-07-16 12:55:16 PM

Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life.


I've had some outstanding older zins from Ridge.  The key is a refined winemaking style... lower %ETOH, less extraction.  The giant high ethanol fruit bombs are best within a few years.
 
2013-07-16 12:56:52 PM
If no one is buying it, than how do they arrive at the $30 million value?
 
2013-07-16 12:59:27 PM

proteus_b: What's desireable? pH neutral?


In tomatoes lower is better for canning.  It's about making it hostile to bacteria that might survive the boiling portion of the canning so they can't take over.  Straight up diced tomatoes often aren't acidic enough, so adding lemon juice pushes them over the edge into safety without interfering too much with their taste.  Or you can can them in a pressure cooker (meaning a higher boiling temp, so more hostile to the bacteria).

We learned this when half of our ~25 pound tomato canning adventure turned putrid on us last summer.  Canned sauce was fine, canned diced started bubbling and made an absolutely horrific smell.  This year we're going to can them in the pressure cooker that we bought shortly after realizing they had gone bad.
 
2013-07-16 12:59:58 PM

Magorn: In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.


There is likely a bit of oxidation through the cork.  Regardless, though, bottle aging definitely changes wine.  To say nothing else happens once it's in the bottle is probably true for scotch, but is absolutely false for wine.  Phenols and other aromatics change, sedimenet solidifies, tannins soften.  Red wine takes on a more brickish color.  That's the whole point to cellaring, along with the collection aspect of it.  If nothing changed, bottled wine would be eternal which is isn't.
 
2013-07-16 01:00:31 PM
If they put it in a box it would sell big here.
 
2013-07-16 01:03:48 PM
Wine so bad not even the Russians will buy it deserves to be poured down the drain.
 
2013-07-16 01:05:11 PM

proteus_b: Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life. Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux can age for decades. Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled. In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry. In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.

That sounds quite plausible, but nonetheless, when people boast of having a "Chateau de Chacery, 1954", the understanding is that it was bottled in that year. Also, do you know <i> why </i> aging in a cask is different than aging in a bottle?


They brag about the 1954 but 1) it's old for old's sake 2) That year was a particularly tasty vintage. 3) Rare = expensive = wealth flaunting.

Aging in casks is different than bottles because the wood imparts flavours that a glass or metal container won't. Once the fermenting/aging process is done and the liquid transferred to it's bottles and capped, it's going to stay as is - barring things like leaky corks that will slowly skunk the liquid. Wine, whiskey, vinegar, beer, etc all taste better having all or part of its process in casks.
 
2013-07-16 01:07:22 PM

proteus_b: Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life. Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux can age for decades. Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled. In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry. In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.

That sounds quite plausible, but nonetheless, when people boast of having a "Chateau de Chacery, 1954", the understanding is that it was bottled in that year. Also, do you know <i> why </i> aging in a cask is different than aging in a bottle?



In the cask, the chemicals that make up the flavor of wine are exposed to some oxygen and are chemically active.   Once it's bottled in an airtight bottle that process largely stops.  In fact, most of the flavor changes that occur after wine is bottled are considered a bad thing which wine owners try to avoid by keeping the bottles in dark, cool  places.

   So why is , say, a 1963 bottle of blah-blah more valued than a 1983 or 2012 one?

Well it gets complicated, and I am by no means an expert, but:  The "vintage" of a wine is not necessarily the year the wine hit the bottle but the year the grapes were grown and the wine was originally pressed.  Some years the grapes are better than others because the growing conditions (low amounts of rain, a long, hot summer so the grapes have a lower water content) were especially good that year.

 When the grapes are near- perfect, the gowers of a region will "declare a vintage"  and publically announce that, say, the 2005 Bordeaux is gonna be way better than the 2004 or 2003.  Wine "futures" are then sold to wholesalers for that particular vintage, and a vintage year can cost 5x as much as a non-vintage one for a particular bottle.  The wholesalers then have to wait till the wine is actually pressed, aged and finally bottled, which can take several years.

Then they take delivery of thier shares of the vintage and re-sell it to consumers.  That's where prices can go really nuts as the experts taste the wine and rate it, word of mouth spreads, etc.  Suddenly that Bordeaux that's usually say, $50/ bottle that the wholesaler may have paid $250-300/ bottle for is being snapped up by wine enthusiasts for $1,000 or even $10,000 bottle.

Obviously not all wine that special is drunk right away, and much gets stored away as investments or for special occasions.    So when the host busts out say a '45 Chateaux Laffite  the specialness of the wine isn't that it's been sitting around for half a century, but how wonderful the wine made from the grapes of that particulr year were.
 
2013-07-16 01:11:17 PM
Silly ozzies -- did you really think poor kids' infatuation with Yellow Tail was going to last forever?
 
2013-07-16 01:11:21 PM

proteus_b: Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life. Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux can age for decades. Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled. In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry. In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.

That sounds quite plausible, but nonetheless, when people boast of having a "Chateau de Chacery, 1954", the understanding is that it was bottled in that year. Also, do you know <i> why </i> aging in a cask is different than aging in a bottle?


No.

It was HARVESTED in that year.

Aging in a barrel has several external factors going on
1) Contact with the lees (varying levels, depending on racking and stirring practices)
2) Contact with wood
3) Percolation of oxygen through the wood
4) Temperature

Aging in the bottle has
1) Oxygen percolation through the cork
2) Light through the glass (which is almost always bad)
3) Temperature

All those factors can accelerate, retard, or modify the ongoing chemical reactions, that are running at a very slow rate, in any organic solution like wine.
 
2013-07-16 01:11:25 PM
If you are pouring it down the drain, it is NOT worth $32 mil.  If it was worth $32 mil then you would sell it for $32 mil.

See how that works?
 
2013-07-16 01:18:21 PM

Magorn: proteus_b: Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life. Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux can age for decades. Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled. In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry. In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.

That sounds quite plausible, but nonetheless, when people boast of having a "Chateau de Chacery, 1954", the understanding is that it was bottled in that year. Also, do you know <i> why </i> aging in a cask is different than aging in a bottle?


In the cask, <snip>...


That's actually pretty cool. Thank you, it's always fun to learn a bit of trivia.

Curious if there's some sort of oversight to this "declaring a vintage" and what prevents a company from just declaring any random year a "vintage"
 
2013-07-16 01:27:26 PM

Nexzus: Magorn: proteus_b: Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life. Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux can age for decades. Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled. In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry. In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.

That sounds quite plausible, but nonetheless, when people boast of having a "Chateau de Chacery, 1954", the understanding is that it was bottled in that year. Also, do you know <i> why </i> aging in a cask is different than aging in a bottle?


In the cask, <snip>...

That's actually pretty cool. Thank you, it's always fun to learn a bit of trivia.

Curious if there's some sort of oversight to this "declaring a vintage" and what prevents a company from just declaring any random year a "vintage"


Declaring a vintage is only done in Port and a few other areas.  What they are saying is that "We, Producer XYZ, think the wine this year is good enough to sell with a vintage year on it".  As opposed to the other years, when they say "We, Producer XYZ, think this wine is not good enough to sell with a vintage year on it.  Instead, we will blend it with the harvests from other years to producer one of our 'base' wines".  Producer XYZ might declare, Producer ABC might not.

Generally, there is no formal, legal oversight, but these people have known each other for generations and usually won't go out of their way to fark with each other.  Again, this is specific to Port and a few other fortified and/or dessert wine zones.  Champagne growers do a similar thing, but it's not called "declaring".

In other parts of the world, where the wines are virtually always sold with the vintage date, winemakers will use second wines.  A second wine is a subsidiary label that contains the stuff that isn't good enough for the top label.  Imagine if GM had one assembly line - as the cars came off the line, they were test-driven.  The best ones got a Cadillac label, the next tier got a Buick label, and the worst ones were sold as Chevrolets.

/want to know more?  I'm available for consultation, private tastings, cellar-building advice, and restaurant wine list development
//I hold a CSW from the American Society of Wine Educators
///been in and out of the business since I was 8 years old
 
2013-07-16 01:32:29 PM

Nexzus: Curious if there's some sort of oversight to this "declaring a vintage" and what prevents a company from just declaring any random year a "vintage"


Outside of Vintage Port, I believe every other wine region releases wines on a yearly basis, based on the year the grapes were grown and harvested.  I don't think Magorn has his facts correct.
 
2013-07-16 01:33:19 PM

plcow: If you are pouring it down the drain, it is NOT worth $32 mil.  If it was worth $32 mil then you would sell it for $32 mil.

See how that works?


By that logic we have no value to assign to things that are wasted to get an idea of how much is being wasted.  Which is a pretty useless state to be in.

The caveat is "If the stock were to be sold at current market price" then it would be $32m.  Sure they could flood the market and thus reduce the price due to the increased demand, but whether or not they'd actually make money on it is questionable.  Sure the stock itself isn't truly worth $32m since nobody would buy it at that price.  But it's useful to be able to put a dollar amount on such a group of items for reference to the potential sales that were wasted.
 
2013-07-16 01:40:28 PM

FrancoFile: Nexzus: Magorn: proteus_b: Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life. Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux can age for decades. Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled. In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry. In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.

That sounds quite plausible, but nonetheless, when people boast of having a "Chateau de Chacery, 1954", the understanding is that it was bottled in that year. Also, do you know <i> why </i> aging in a cask is different than aging in a bottle?


In the cask, <snip>...

That's actually pretty cool. Thank you, it's always fun to learn a bit of trivia.

Curious if there's some sort of oversight to this "declaring a vintage" and what prevents a company from just declaring any random year a "vintage"

Declaring a vintage is only done in Port and a few other areas.  What they are saying is that "We, Producer XYZ, think the wine this year is good enough to sell with a vintage year on it".  As opposed to the other years, when they say "We, Producer XYZ, think this wine is not good enough to sell with a vintage year on it.  Instead, we will blend it with the harvests from other years to producer one of our 'base' wines".  Producer XYZ might declare, Producer ABC might not.

Generally, there is no formal, legal oversight, but these people have known each other for generations and usually won't go out of their way to fark with each other.  Again, this is specific to Port and a few other fortified and/or dessert wine zones.  Champagne growers do a similar thing, but it's not called "declaring".

In other parts of the world, where the wines are virtually always sold with the vintage date, winemakers will use second wines.  A second wine is a subsidiary label that contains the stuff that isn't good enough for the top label.  Imagine if GM had one assembly line - as the cars came off the line, they w ...


Don't the Bordeaux makers also declare vintages from time to time?  Perhaps not in as formal language, but I'd swear i've seen news stories or press releases from that area in various years declaring how wonderful or not a praticular year's grapes were
 
2013-07-16 01:40:47 PM

NkThrasher: The caveat is "If the stock were to be sold at current market price" then it would be $32m.  Sure they could flood the market and thus reduce the price due to the increased demand supply, but whether or not they'd actually make money on it is questionable.  Sure the stock itself isn't truly worth $32m since nobody would buy it at that price.  But it's useful to be able to put a dollar amount on such a group of items for reference to the potential sales that were wasted.


Herp.
 
2013-07-16 01:45:56 PM

Magorn: FrancoFile: Nexzus: Magorn: proteus_b: Magorn: Some wines, like say Zinfandel, have a very limited shelf life. Some, like burgundies or Bordeaux can age for decades. Though for most wines, any advantage age gives them stops the moment they are bottled. In the cask, aging is doing all sorts of interesting things to the wine's chemistry. In an air tight sealed bottle, not so much.

That sounds quite plausible, but nonetheless, when people boast of having a "Chateau de Chacery, 1954", the understanding is that it was bottled in that year. Also, do you know <i> why </i> aging in a cask is different than aging in a bottle?


In the cask, <snip>...

That's actually pretty cool. Thank you, it's always fun to learn a bit of trivia.

Curious if there's some sort of oversight to this "declaring a vintage" and what prevents a company from just declaring any random year a "vintage"

Declaring a vintage is only done in Port and a few other areas.  What they are saying is that "We, Producer XYZ, think the wine this year is good enough to sell with a vintage year on it".  As opposed to the other years, when they say "We, Producer XYZ, think this wine is not good enough to sell with a vintage year on it.  Instead, we will blend it with the harvests from other years to producer one of our 'base' wines".  Producer XYZ might declare, Producer ABC might not.

Generally, there is no formal, legal oversight, but these people have known each other for generations and usually won't go out of their way to fark with each other.  Again, this is specific to Port and a few other fortified and/or dessert wine zones.  Champagne growers do a similar thing, but it's not called "declaring".

In other parts of the world, where the wines are virtually always sold with the vintage date, winemakers will use second wines.  A second wine is a subsidiary label that contains the stuff that isn't good enough for the top label.  Imagine if GM had one assembly line - as the cars came off the ...


Don't the Bordeaux makers also declare vintages from time to time?  Perhaps not in as formal language, but I'd swear i've seen news stories or press releases from that area in various years declaring how wonderful or not a praticular year's grapes were


That's not 'declaring'.  That's just saying "2000 is an excellent year", "2003 is the best vintage of the decade", etc.  More the wine press than the winemakers themselves.
 
2013-07-16 01:51:53 PM

Magorn: Don't the Bordeaux makers also declare vintages from time to time?  Perhaps not in as formal language, but I'd swear i've seen news stories or press releases from that area in various years declaring how wonderful or not a praticular year's grapes were


Bordeaux releases wine every year.  Some (2000, 1995, 1989, 1982 for example) are truly excellent... some not so much.  Vintages vary drastically due to weather and growing conditions.  That said, every year a vintage is released.

In a truly dreadful year a particular chateau man not release its flagship wine, but that is house to house dependent.

Portugal (vintage Port) is the exception.  A Vintage Year isn't declared yearly.  In non-vintage years the houses may release LBV (late bottled vintage) Ports, or may simply put those wines into non-vintage wines.

Wine laws vary from region and country, but for the most part Most wineries release wines every year and label them as such (by their year or vintage).
 
2013-07-16 02:02:01 PM
Drain? Fark that, at least have the decency to turn it into brandy or ethanol fuel or something.
 
2013-07-16 02:21:40 PM
DNRTFA

Is it the Yellow Tail wine? Also, why throw it away, doesn't wine improve with age? Why not keep it, age it, sell it next year as "special reserve" or something?
 
2013-07-16 02:25:16 PM

TrainingWheelsNeeded: DNRTFA

Is it the Yellow Tail wine? Also, why throw it away, doesn't wine improve with age? Why not keep it, age it, sell it next year as "special reserve" or something?


you also DNRTFT.  We've covered that.  Most wines don't improve with age.  These are wines that are headed downhill rapidly.
 
2013-07-16 02:25:42 PM
I've heard that Australian wine is good because it has less tannins so you're less likely to get a hangover.

I've also had many bottles of Blue Eyed Boy and highly recommend it.
vinesleuth.com
 
2013-07-16 02:27:54 PM

TrainingWheelsNeeded: Is it the Yellow Tail wine? Also, why throw it away, doesn't wine improve with age? Why not keep it, age it, sell it next year as "special reserve" or something?


No.  Once wine reaches a certain point, it starts to fall apart.  Poorly made wines (over extracted, high alcohol, etc) wines fall apart much faster, as do certain wine types (ie Sauvignon Blanc doesn't age well, Cabernet Sauvignon ages better).  In this case the wine represented a surplus sitting in warehouses.  As the wine aged in bottle it started to get to the point that it was worsening.  At that point, unless it can be sold as clearance (assuming quality was OK), it is worthless.  Selling flawed wine is a surefire way to ensure your future wines won't sell.
 
2013-07-16 02:39:25 PM

omahatattoo: I've heard that Australian wine is good because it has less tannins so you're less likely to get a hangover.

I've also had many bottles of Blue Eyed Boy and highly recommend it.
[vinesleuth.com image 500x667]


1) Tannins don't cause hangovers.
2) If anything, Australian wines have more tannin than French (grape-for-grape) because of their hotter, drier growing conditions.

/Gigglepot is my favorite Mollydooker
 
2013-07-16 02:43:16 PM
Idiots.
That is a lot of wine/vinegar/sugar/water.
That all could be put to good use.
You could let it go to vinegar, and pickle free watermelon rinds, and make a tidy profit with a warehouse full of specialty pickled rinds.
 
2013-07-16 02:43:39 PM

NkThrasher: Temperature fluctuations matter a lot for beer, you want it to go through as few cold/warm transitions as possible


No they don't. It's not the "fluctuation" it's the temperature. Taking a beer to 70 to 39 to 70 to 39 in one hour won't do anything appreciable. Though taking it to 70, and keeping it there for a week might.
 
2013-07-16 02:44:55 PM

FrancoFile: omahatattoo: I've heard that Australian wine is good because it has less tannins so you're less likely to get a hangover.

I've also had many bottles of Blue Eyed Boy and highly recommend it.
[vinesleuth.com image 500x667]

1) Tannins don't cause hangovers.
2) If anything, Australian wines have more tannin than French (grape-for-grape) because of their hotter, drier growing conditions.

/Gigglepot is my favorite Mollydooker


Noted and noted.  I'll have to see if I can locate a Gigglepot
 
2013-07-16 02:44:59 PM

I_Am_Weasel: It's true!  Americans just don't appreciate a good Australian wine.

  A lot of people in this country pooh-pooh Australian table wines. This is a pity as many fine Australian wines appeal not only to the Australian palate but also to the cognoscenti of United States.

 For example,Black Stump Bordeaux is rightly praised as a peppermint flavoured Burgundy, whilst a good Sydney Syrup can rank with any of the world's best sugary wines.Of the sparkling wines, the most famous is Perth Pink. This is a bottle with a message in, and the message is 'beware'. This is not a wine for drinking, this is a wine for laying down and avoiding.

Another good fighting wine is Melbourne Old-and-Yellow, which is particularly heavy and should be used only for hand-to-hand combat.Quite the reverse is true of Château Chunder, which is an appellation contrôlée, specially grown for those keen on regurgitation; a fine wine which really opens up the sluices at both ends.Real emetic fans will also go for a Hobart Muddy, and a prize winning Cuivre Reserve Château Bottled Nuit San Wogga Wogga, which has a bouquet like an aborigine's armpit.


ole stuff that monty python
 
2013-07-16 02:52:35 PM

impaler: NkThrasher: Temperature fluctuations matter a lot for beer, you want it to go through as few cold/warm transitions as possible

No they don't. It's not the "fluctuation" it's the temperature. Taking a beer to 70 to 39 to 70 to 39 in one hour won't do anything appreciable. Though taking it to 70, and keeping it there for a week might.


I'll freely admit I'm a brewing newbie, my first batch finishes in a few weeks.  But I have read on various forums scattered about on several occasions that transitioning from warm/cold and back again eventually does have an impact on bottled beer in addition to storing it at the wrong temp.  If you're talking about extended aging of something in a non-carefully controlled environment and under the assumption that transitions do matter if enough of them occur, I'd consider it a valid thought.
 
2013-07-16 02:53:22 PM
Had an Australian girl in Vienna tell me over wine that she tried a California wine once that even though she thought all American booze was shiat it was "quite good." Then followed up with "I didn't even know they made wine in California!"

Yep.
 
2013-07-16 02:54:14 PM
They should give it to the aboriginal people to keep them from drinking Sterno.
 
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