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(France 24)   US approves first brainwave test for ADHD. The interesting part of the test is that...hey, look, a bike. Let's go ride   (france24.com ) divider line
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976 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Jul 2013 at 11:05 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-16 11:11:59 AM  
Awesome!

The thing that bothers me most about ADHD (besides having to spell it like that even though folks in inattentive don't have much hyperactivity) is that it's so farking imprecise. My son's medication is ultimately based on whether I "feel" it's about right. And that changes almost from day to day. I'd pay through the nose to have some objective measurement of not only his ADD but also the effectiveness of any treatment.
 
2013-07-16 11:13:32 AM  
Great, now they're going to add technology to the quackery to drive the costs up even higher.
 
2013-07-16 11:15:37 AM  
How can they scan for something that's doesn't exist?
 
2013-07-16 11:22:10 AM  

JinxofSpades: How can they scan for something that's doesn't exist?


Worthless parents / grandparents who insist their kid is defective will believe anything if it means they can "do the right thing" and be a big hero in their own delusional mind.
 
2013-07-16 11:26:01 AM  

Smeggy Smurf: JinxofSpades: How can they scan for something that's doesn't exist?

Worthless parents / grandparents who insist their kid is defective will believe anything if it means they can "do the right thing" and be a big hero in their own delusional mind.


I think many kids are diagnosed with this as an easy excuse to explain away bad behavior... but I've seen kids that get distracted so easily it's insane...

My GF's kid can be asked to go take the dishes out of the washer, and midway get distracted and leave them there undone...

One day asked her to go get the mail out of the mailbox, 45 minutes she comes back, saw a stray cat, decided to go pet it... never got the mail.
 
2013-07-16 11:26:24 AM  
I'm suuuure it will exclude a number of cases.
 
2013-07-16 11:26:54 AM  
A 15-20 minute test calculates the ratio of certain brain wave frequencies known as theta and beta waves in children age six to 17.

Nice try psychiatrists... but you can only measure thetan levels with an e-meter.
 
2013-07-16 11:29:50 AM  
The online ADHD course I took mentioned the beta/theta imbalance as one of the signs of the syndrome.  I wondered at the time why nobody had come up with an easy test- attaching a couple of electrodes to your scalp isn't exactly expensive or invasive, and it would really help.

I'd love to see it miniaturized to the point normal people can use it- my son's ADHD ebbs and flows based on a bunch of factors we don't really understand.  Growth spurts are clearly part of it, but not all.  If we had an idea of his baseline we could tailor his meds on a day-to-day basis, which would be great since we'd really like to minimize some of the side effects.
 
2013-07-16 11:50:24 AM  
The results for the test are going to be a big blow to those with self-diagnosed ADHD and parents who feed their kids high-sugar products instead of healthy food.
 
2013-07-16 11:51:09 AM  

KellyX: Smeggy Smurf: JinxofSpades: How can they scan for something that's doesn't exist?

Worthless parents / grandparents who insist their kid is defective will believe anything if it means they can "do the right thing" and be a big hero in their own delusional mind.

I think many kids are diagnosed with this as an easy excuse to explain away bad behavior... but I've seen kids that get distracted so easily it's insane...

My GF's kid can be asked to go take the dishes out of the washer, and midway get distracted and leave them there undone...

One day asked her to go get the mail out of the mailbox, 45 minutes she comes back, saw a stray cat, decided to go pet it... never got the mail.


Chew him out every time.  He'll get the idea in a hurry.  When he blows it, make him do something extremely boring that'll take a long time.  Something like cleaning the bathroom.  It'll drive him nuts but it'll get through his thick skull.
 
2013-07-16 11:54:55 AM  

Glockenspiel Hero: The online ADHD course I took mentioned the beta/theta imbalance as one of the signs of the syndrome.  I wondered at the time why nobody had come up with an easy test- attaching a couple of electrodes to your scalp isn't exactly expensive or invasive, and it would really help.

I'd love to see it miniaturized to the point normal people can use it- my son's ADHD ebbs and flows based on a bunch of factors we don't really understand.  Growth spurts are clearly part of it, but not all.  If we had an idea of his baseline we could tailor his meds on a day-to-day basis, which would be great since we'd really like to minimize some of the side effects.


Have you taken into account noise levels and crowds/overstimulating environments? My hubby's ADHD goes through the roof whenever we're in a noisy, overstimulating place.
 
2013-07-16 11:59:19 AM  

Glockenspiel Hero: I'd love to see it miniaturized to the point normal people can use it- my son's ADHD ebbs and flows based on a bunch of factors we don't really understand. Growth spurts are clearly part of it, but not all. If we had an idea of his baseline we could tailor his meds on a day-to-day basis, which would be great since we'd really like to minimize some of the side effects.


Lord, yes. We're still not sure on ours either. Sleep seems to be part of it. School is a big black box, though. And we've got a bathroom problem that I think hugely affects his attention/emotions.

We did however find a medication that has almost no side-effects, and that's a godsend. I don't know how willing you are to experiment (or how bad the ADHD is for you guys), but I'm really glad we did.
 
2013-07-16 12:01:59 PM  
As a kid I was diagnosed with ADHD and didn't take kindly to the odd, not always useful meds doctors gave out like candy. I eventually ended up with a brilliant neurophysiologist who:

A. realised I was generally much smarter than most people thought (that was good for my esteem)
B.Used an EEG and biofeedback software to help me learn how to have some amazing focus control.

Biofeedback can be very effective, but it's not nearly as profitable as the pills are for the drug companies.
 
2013-07-16 12:10:52 PM  

Rolander: B.Used an EEG and biofeedback software to help me learn how to have some amazing focus control.


This is fascinating. I wonder if a cheapo "mind control" game would help. I suspect not. One assumes one would do best with an actual professional. :)
 
2013-07-16 12:12:55 PM  
 
2013-07-16 12:16:37 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: KellyX: Smeggy Smurf: JinxofSpades: How can they scan for something that's doesn't exist?

Worthless parents / grandparents who insist their kid is defective will believe anything if it means they can "do the right thing" and be a big hero in their own delusional mind.

I think many kids are diagnosed with this as an easy excuse to explain away bad behavior... but I've seen kids that get distracted so easily it's insane...

My GF's kid can be asked to go take the dishes out of the washer, and midway get distracted and leave them there undone...

One day asked her to go get the mail out of the mailbox, 45 minutes she comes back, saw a stray cat, decided to go pet it... never got the mail.

Chew him out every time.  He'll get the idea in a hurry.  When he blows it, make him do something extremely boring that'll take a long time.  Something like cleaning the bathroom.  It'll drive him nuts but it'll get through his thick skull.


She, and I do, or try to... Not easy to do proper discipline when the GF sometimes tries to let her emotions get jerked around.
 
2013-07-16 12:17:09 PM  
shortymac:

Have you taken into account noise levels and crowds/overstimulating environments? My hubby's ADHD goes through the roof whenever we're in a noisy, overstimulating place.

Mine does, too.
 
2013-07-16 12:29:21 PM  

Rolander: As a kid I was diagnosed with ADHD and didn't take kindly to the odd, not always useful meds doctors gave out like candy. I eventually ended up with a brilliant neurophysiologist who:

A. realised I was generally much smarter than most people thought (that was good for my esteem)
B.Used an EEG and biofeedback software to help me learn how to have some amazing focus control.

Biofeedback can be very effective, but it's not nearly as profitable as the pills are for the drug companies.


What exactly is that type of therapy called? I would love my hubby to take it, the problem with meds for him is that they'll work for 3-6 months and just stop working. :(
 
2013-07-16 01:16:17 PM  
Smeggy Smurf:

Chew him out every time.  He'll get the idea in a hurry.  When he blows it, make him do something extremely boring that'll take a long time.  Something like cleaning the bathroom.  It'll drive him nuts but it'll get through his thick skull.

Not sure if trolling...?

If ADHD is at work, punishment will not change the behavior--only destroy the kid's self-confidence.  You might as well try to "chew out" a dwarf for being short.
 
2013-07-16 01:22:11 PM  
Another snake oil test for an imaginary disease.
 
2013-07-16 01:27:06 PM  

Rambino: Smeggy Smurf:

Chew him out every time.  He'll get the idea in a hurry.  When he blows it, make him do something extremely boring that'll take a long time.  Something like cleaning the bathroom.  It'll drive him nuts but it'll get through his thick skull.

Not sure if trolling...?

If ADHD is at work, punishment will not change the behavior--only destroy the kid's self-confidence.  You might as well try to "chew out" a dwarf for being short.


Well, I'm looking for any advice at this point, GF doesn't want to do drugs (and I understand too) until she's closer to 12-13 (she's 9 right now), but the easily distracted issues are becoming very bad, the lack of listening, paying attention, easily losing attention, etc. Even teachers have voiced concern.

Yesterday she disappeared while I was at work and GF didn't know where she was cause she didn't bother to say and just disappeared because she encountered some other kids...
 
2013-07-16 01:59:42 PM  

shortymac: What exactly is that type of therapy called? I would love my hubby to take it, the problem with meds for him is that they'll work for 3-6 months and just stop working. :(



This is their web site:  http://www.qeeg.com/

it's not a great website but it's functional.
 
2013-07-16 02:01:55 PM  

shortymac: Have you taken into account noise levels and crowds/overstimulating environments? My hubby's ADHD goes through the roof whenever we're in a noisy, overstimulating place.


That is not ADHD.... he is only using that as a cover for why he is staring at that all the women around.

/it is what I do.
 
2013-07-16 02:11:18 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: KellyX: Smeggy Smurf: JinxofSpades: How can they scan for something that's doesn't exist?

Worthless parents / grandparents who insist their kid is defective will believe anything if it means they can "do the right thing" and be a big hero in their own delusional mind.

I think many kids are diagnosed with this as an easy excuse to explain away bad behavior... but I've seen kids that get distracted so easily it's insane...

My GF's kid can be asked to go take the dishes out of the washer, and midway get distracted and leave them there undone...

One day asked her to go get the mail out of the mailbox, 45 minutes she comes back, saw a stray cat, decided to go pet it... never got the mail.

Chew him out every time.  He'll get the idea in a hurry.  When he blows it, make him do something extremely boring that'll take a long time.  Something like cleaning the bathroom.  It'll drive him nuts but it'll get through his thick skull.


Seems obvious you have very limited experience with ADD.
 
2013-07-16 02:12:48 PM  
A 15-20 minute test calculates the ratio of certain brain wave frequencies known as theta and beta waves in children age six to 17.

If your kid can sit through the whole test, he doesn't have it.
 
2013-07-16 02:34:12 PM  

KellyX: Rambino: Smeggy Smurf:

Chew him out every time.  He'll get the idea in a hurry.  When he blows it, make him do something extremely boring that'll take a long time.  Something like cleaning the bathroom.  It'll drive him nuts but it'll get through his thick skull.

Not sure if trolling...?

If ADHD is at work, punishment will not change the behavior--only destroy the kid's self-confidence.  You might as well try to "chew out" a dwarf for being short.

Well, I'm looking for any advice at this point, GF doesn't want to do drugs (and I understand too) until she's closer to 12-13 (she's 9 right now), but the easily distracted issues are becoming very bad, the lack of listening, paying attention, easily losing attention, etc. Even teachers have voiced concern.

Yesterday she disappeared while I was at work and GF didn't know where she was cause she didn't bother to say and just disappeared because she encountered some other kids...


Ignore Smeggy Smurf.  Judging by the "logic" he's employed so far with regards to ADHD, I suspect he also believes evolution is a scientific conspiracy also.

Medicine is a pain in the ass to deal with, but it will probably help once it gets worked out to the correct dosage, which may take a while.  A lot of the complaints about medicines seem to stem from people that give it a little try for themselves or their kids, but don't get the dosage worked out, assume the current state will always be the case with the medicine, and thus write the medicine off completely. That isn't to say that medicine will necessarily work given enough time to work out the correct dosage, but it's not as bad as some people will make it out to be.

Ultimately, you'll need to just deal with a good psychiatrist and let them give advice for your situation.

With that said, there's some stuff you can do on the non-medical side that will actually help.  First, don't punish your kid like they're just misbehaving and can totally not get distracted if they don't want to.  Your kid isn't stupid or lazy, she's just dealing with a brain with executive function issues.  You have to recognize that she can't properly manage her attention and focus like the average person and thus must have workarounds.  Short people need step ladders to reach items on top shelves, parapalegics need wheelchairs for mobility, your child needs compensation for her attention span.

Try helping your kid organize.  Lists are amazing things for someone with attention deficit.  Get brightly colored paper that sticks out visually to make the lists on, keep them somewhere near where the child will be frequently.  Get her in the habit of making lists every time she has things to do.  If she has tasks that are going to take a long time that she can't focus on well (ADHD doesn't mean you can't focus on anything, it means your brain has a harder time prioritizing focus correctly), give her 15-20 minute breaks every hour or so to do something else.  Being forced to stay on the same task exclusively will only make it harder for her to focus.  Also, help her with long tasks.  If she starts getting off-task, you can gently nudge her back on task.  You'd be surprised just how much having another person helping with a task can keep an ADHD person focused by the helper just being present.

Another thing to remember is that with ADHD, any tasks that don't have quick, tangible results are going to feel like a pointless slog that's accomplishing nothing.  Instead of focusing on the end goal, try to get her to focus on intermediate milestones that will be achieved much more quicklyand organize the tasks as such.  She'll get the feeling of accomplishment that will help her focus on the task, as well as continue progress towards the main goal.  Such intermediate goals will also be useful ways to signify break points.  Something like: do the first quarter of her math homework, take a break for a snack if she's hungry or to do another subject's homework for a bit.

And this always bears saying and repeating, but don't get mad at her for those things she can't control.  It's also a good idea to get her involved in coming up with specific plans for dealing with difficulties she encounters from ADHD.  It'll get her into habits that will serve her well with keeping the ADHD under control for the rest of her life, plus it'll give her a sense of agency that tells her she isn't powerless in the face of her problems.

Of course, you'll have to work out what works best with regards to your specific situation.  I wish you, your GF, and your child lots of luck with this.
 
2013-07-16 02:40:49 PM  

KellyX: Well, I'm looking for any advice at this point, GF doesn't want to do drugs (and I understand too) until she's closer to 12-13 (she's 9 right now), but the easily distracted issues are becoming very bad, the lack of listening, paying attention, easily losing attention, etc. Even teachers have voiced concern.


I don't know what you all have done, so here's a short list of possibilities - use or ignore at will. I'm still working with my son, so these are NOT a complete list. Just more what I've taken notes on. :)

1. Find a list of symptoms. The longer the better (since that'll give you a better idea of what's involved). There are official tests you can take, usually supplied by your doctor or a psychologist. There's at least two official ones (Vanderbilt and and Connor's) that will probably be better, since they're 3-4 pages and they have more detail.

2. The girl's school SHOULD have the resources to do full testing - although not chemical nor anything very specific (this will be hugely frustrating just so you know). They can do speech, fine motor, gross motor, OT (occupational therapy? I dunno. My notes just say OT). That at least might give you guys more information as to what specifically is wrong.

3. Talk more to the teachers. Ours did the namby-pamby "Well he just can't do anything", but eventually we got a more fine-tuned list. You WILL encounter the fact that they will not a) say anything truly horrible about the kid, nor b) will they recommend drugs directly. They will talk a lot about changing patterns at home and so on. That's not bad information, but it's not horribly useful if you're already doing that sort of thing.

4. If you've got access to a neurologist (and most don't), it wouldn't hurt to go see one.

5. Also, I recommend a child psychologist or psychiatrist simply because they have more experience seeing all kinds of kids. HOWEVER (super important) if you don't agree with the psychologist or if you aren't comfortable with them (or she isn't), then don't hesitate to find another one. Fast! Ditto pediatricians.

6. If it's mild enough or it seems like sometimes she's better than others, you can certainly try various diets. Our psychiatrist mentioned low sugar, low gluten, and low red dye 40 / additives. If those seem like a good idea, try them! Some people have had a lot of improvement on them!

7. Okay. Lifestyle changes. You know the list. Structure. Everything in the same place every time. Methodical is the word of the day.

8. Study habits. Are there better times of day to get stuff done? Does she do better with music? Without?

9. I'm doing this chronologically so it's not in very good order, but check with the pediatrician/psychologist to make sure other things aren't exacerbating the problem. Anxiety is a biatch, especially for kids! It really can mean the difference between success and failure.

10. Also, her teachers might offer to help, as well. They can do intervention (but only on an official diagnosis, I think), but they can also maybe give her extra time, or put her in a quieter part of the class, or send home a sheet showing what activities she's doing better at than others (they did this for my son, but he was much younger).

11. You should certainly be careful with drugs, but... Well. At the end of the day, if her ADHD is bad enough that she's seriously falling behind on her schoolwork (her teachers should know what the breakpoint is for that. Probably about 6-12 months behind) or her life just sucks and nothing seems to be getting you guys to the point where you have hope again... Eh. Talk to a pediatrician or psychologist.

/This is all from my hugely subjective experience so YMMV :)
 
2013-07-16 02:45:02 PM  

uknesvuinng: Of course, you'll have to work out what works best with regards to your specific situation. I wish you, your GF, and your child lots of luck with this.


I like everything you said. Especially the lists thing.

Sadly, I have lists of lists. Then I lose the list... :P
 
2013-07-16 02:52:58 PM  
I've always wanted to see what my son's brain activity looked like when he was stimming his ass off.   No doctor's would do it, though, as that shiat is expensive.

/ Autism rocks.
 
2013-07-16 03:11:53 PM  

Aidan: uknesvuinng: Of course, you'll have to work out what works best with regards to your specific situation. I wish you, your GF, and your child lots of luck with this.

I like everything you said. Especially the lists thing.

Sadly, I have lists of lists. Then I lose the list... :P


I pretty much have to have a list to remind me to make lists.  I usually don't have that list though because I don't have a list to remind me to make a list to remind me to make lists.  I need a list for that.

I had one really cool boss in my retail hell days that understood the value of a list to me, and as a result would have one for me every time I was scheduled to work.  I had a great deal more productivity working with her.

Another thing that just occurred to me re: childhood ADHD.  It's not something to necessarily worry about now, and may not come up as an issue at all depending upon other factors, but in adolescence, ADHD kids can have difficulty with the finer points of social skills.  When you're young, things are a bit looser and more forgiving, but about high school, social rules start getting complex, arbitrary, and just generally weird, and with ADHD, it's easy to just completely miss cues and such that other kids see as obvious.  But as I said, it's really dependent on a lot of other factors.  There's not really anything to be done about it that you wouldn't do as a parent should your kid have trouble socializing for any other reason, but it's worth keeping in mind as something that may occur in the future.
 
2013-07-16 03:13:45 PM  

Aidan: I don't know what you all have done, so here's a short list of possibilities - use or ignore at will. I'm still working with my son, so these are NOT a complete list. Just more what I've taken notes on. :)


uknesvuinng: Medicine is a pain in the ass to deal with, but it will probably help once it gets worked out to the correct dosage,


Thanks, the lists I've tried doing, should try to more actively get her to make those.

Drugs probably out, I know when she does something really bad we've had to put her in time out, she hates sitting there with nothing to do. We let her play WOW too, but when she misbehaves she loses access to that, which upsets her too of course.

I have had to many times remind her to get back on task, I know I shouldn't feel annoyed, it's just difficult for me sometimes to understand how she can lose her attention so rapidly.

We've tried doing the list of tasks and getting a sticker for completing them each day and that earns rewards, but she loses interest fast or thinks she deserves a sticker on days she doesn't do something she's supposed to...

Very vexing at times.
 
2013-07-16 03:36:10 PM  

domdare: The results for the test are going to be a big blow to those with self-diagnosed ADHD and parents who feed their kids high-sugar products instead of healthy food.



img.pandawhale.com
 
2013-07-16 03:52:30 PM  

KellyX: Aidan: I don't know what you all have done, so here's a short list of possibilities - use or ignore at will. I'm still working with my son, so these are NOT a complete list. Just more what I've taken notes on. :)

uknesvuinng: Medicine is a pain in the ass to deal with, but it will probably help once it gets worked out to the correct dosage,

Thanks, the lists I've tried doing, should try to more actively get her to make those.

Drugs probably out, I know when she does something really bad we've had to put her in time out, she hates sitting there with nothing to do. We let her play WOW too, but when she misbehaves she loses access to that, which upsets her too of course.

I have had to many times remind her to get back on task, I know I shouldn't feel annoyed, it's just difficult for me sometimes to understand how she can lose her attention so rapidly.

We've tried doing the list of tasks and getting a sticker for completing them each day and that earns rewards, but she loses interest fast or thinks she deserves a sticker on days she doesn't do something she's supposed to...

Very vexing at times.


I'm pretty sure part of that is just simply being a parent.  Kids are still learning how to be people in society, they're gonna make a lot of mistakes.  And with ADHD, what works with "normal" kids isn't necessarily going to work with yours.

Again, try not to punish your kid for things that are beyond her control.  You wouldn't punish your child because she's too short to reach things on the top shelf, so why punish her for having difficulties paying attention?  Of course, actual misbehavior does require consequences, and figuring out what is and isn't something to be punished is tricky, but that's also something that's pretty much standard fare for parenting.

If she's losing focus on lists of interim goals, trying breaking down the main task into even shorter interim goals if you can.  If that doesn't work, or the goals are already about as short-term as you can make them, you may have to consider medicine.  I understand the desire not to medicate, and you may be able to avoid it by using other methods to compensate, but if the ADHD is bad enough, medicine is going to be necessary for her to even successfully employ other methods.  Which is something else to remember with regards to psychiatry and medicine.  Medicine should never be seen as a cure or sufficient treatment, just something of a necessary boost to make it possible for the other treatment options to work.  Think of it sort of as an enzyme, lowering the energy necessary so that a reaction takes place that otherwise couldn't under the given circumstances.  The reaction is the successful employment of compensation strategies, made impossible by the level of ADHD.  The medicine lowers the ADHD enough so that successful employment of the strategies is possible.

Also, don't make the mistake many people do with all kinds of medications for chronic conditions.  That your child is no longer experiencing difficulties when on medicine isn't an indication that the medicine is no longer needed, it's an indication that the medicine is working exactly as it's supposed to.  That's something that is surprisingly easy for people to forget, up until the point they stop the medication and discover that it is in fact still needed.

Of course, I am not a doctor, or in the psych field period, so you'll need to consult with professionals for more specific advice for your situation.

On the subject of bad psychiatrists, I've found a pretty quick indicator to be how much they actually pay attention to what you tell them and seem to stick to some sort of scripted, generic approach when dealing with someone.  I had one psychiatrist that simply refused to treat my ADHD and focused on my OCD and anxiety disorder.  He exclusively wanted to use SSRI's, even though he had my medical history which showed I'd already tried multiple SSRIs with severe side effects every time.  And when I mentioned once that taking Focalin had helped with my anxiety also (difficulties paying attention can make one really anxious, especially if the things one fails to notice occasionally include oncoming traffic), he informed me that it was because I was a kid when I took it.  I had to inform him that I was 25 when I took it, information also available in my medical history, which he had on hand.

Needless to say, I don't see that psychiatrist anymore.

Also, a good night's sleep can help with problems too.  Encourage her to be active, and get her something to provide white noise or music when she goes to bed.  Also, a night light or some other low level light source can be surprisingly helpful.  In pitch-black dark, your eyes and brain put extra effort into trying to find something identifiable.  If it's dark, but with enough light to make out the features of the room, that problem won't occur.  Basically, you want to eliminate or filter out distractions.  Her brain will be running through a ton of random  thoughts while she's trying to get to sleep, anyway, and it doesn't help if the environment provides fuel for more such random thoughts.
 
2013-07-16 04:43:08 PM  

uknesvuinng: KellyX: Rambino: Smeggy Smurf:

Chew him out every time.  He'll get the idea in a hurry.  When he blows it, make him do something extremely boring that'll take a long time.  Something like cleaning the bathroom.  It'll drive him nuts but it'll get through his thick skull.

Not sure if trolling...?

If ADHD is at work, punishment will not change the behavior--only destroy the kid's self-confidence.  You might as well try to "chew out" a dwarf for being short.

Well, I'm looking for any advice at this point, GF doesn't want to do drugs (and I understand too) until she's closer to 12-13 (she's 9 right now), but the easily distracted issues are becoming very bad, the lack of listening, paying attention, easily losing attention, etc. Even teachers have voiced concern.

Yesterday she disappeared while I was at work and GF didn't know where she was cause she didn't bother to say and just disappeared because she encountered some other kids...

Ignore Smeggy Smurf.  Judging by the "logic" he's employed so far with regards to ADHD, I suspect he also believes evolution is a scientific conspiracy also.

Medicine is a pain in the ass to deal with, but it will probably help once it gets worked out to the correct dosage, which may take a while.  A lot of the complaints about medicines seem to stem from people that give it a little try for themselves or their kids, but don't get the dosage worked out, assume the current state will always be the case with the medicine, and thus write the medicine off completely. That isn't to say that medicine will necessarily work given enough time to work out the correct dosage, but it's not as bad as some people will make it out to be.

Ultimately, you'll need to just deal with a good psychiatrist and let them give advice for your situation.

With that said, there's some stuff you can do on the non-medical side that will actually help.  First, don't punish your kid like they're just misbehaving and can totally not get distracted if they don't wan ...



This is a really good post.

I would second all of the above, particularly the bits about lists and a "study buddy" to just be around when the kid is doing task X.  I would also add another couple of thoughts:

1. Habits. ADHDers "forget" things all the time, but they can develop habits and routines.  If anything, their habits, once formed, may be stronger than for regular folks.  So, for the lists, for instance--as noted, lists are no good if you forget to check the list.  So form a habit to check the list every day in the morning before going to school.  Or before going to bed.  Or whenever.  Help them with reminders to check the list at the anointed time, but (hopefully) it will eventually be on autopilot.  Same works for other repeating tasks--get it on autopilot as a habit/routine.  That way there is no active thought required, and the active thought requirement is what leads to distraction.

2. Make it easier by removing hurdles.  The littlest things will throw an ADHDer off track, and many of those little things aren't necessary.  Don't put the list in the night-stand drawer--that requires the huge effort of opening the drawer.  Instead, stick the list right on the bathroom mirror, or the front door, where it can't be missed and requires no effort to read.  I have seen great improvement in tooth-brushing after going to a flip-top cap instead of screw-off cap (for toothpaste).  The mental/physical effort involved in removing the screw-off cap was a little thing that was a major hurdle.

3. Change tasks.  ADHDers find some things really hard and other things really easy.  Obviously homework has to get done regardless, but home chores can be rearranged.  Emptying the dish-washer is a super-difficult task--it takes a long time, and there are so many mini-breaks that allow distraction, and you move around the kitchen where there are so many things to distract.  Horrible.  Rinsing dishes in the sink and putting them in the dishwasher may work better--no distraction breaks, no looking around, and yet diverse and interesting work.  of course everyone is different, so you will have to try different things for yourself.  But you will do wonders for your kid's self-esteem if you can get her a chore(s) that she actually can do well.  She knows she is bad at chores, and hates it just as much as you do.

4. Get the kid outdoors a lot.  Preferably outdoor away from city sounds and sights.  Forests do wonders for ADHD.

5. Get the kid exercise--lots of exercise.  Any exercise will help with symptoms, but "structured" activities are extra-bonus: gymnastics, dancing, martial arts--anything where they have to focus on minute movements and getting it "just so."

6. There are endless resources online. Definitely worth reading up. I like http://www.additudemag.com, but there are many more.

7. Get optimistic.  ADHD may be a handicap at times, but it is also a superpower.
 
2013-07-16 04:54:50 PM  

uknesvuinng: Also, a good night's sleep can help with problems too. Encourage her to be active, and get her something to provide white noise or music when she goes to bed. Also, a night light or some other low level light source can be surprisingly helpful. In pitch-black dark, your eyes and brain put extra effort into trying to find something identifiable. If it's dark, but with enough light to make out the features of the room, that problem won't occur. Basically, you want to eliminate or filter out distractions. Her brain will be running through a ton of random thoughts while she's trying to get to sleep, anyway, and it doesn't help if the environment provides fuel for more such random thoughts



Here I have to partially disagree.  Sleep is absolutely essential for ADHDers, no doubt.  And of course sleep problems are commonly co-morbid with ADHD.  But the treatment/fix varies quite a bit.

Many ADHDers respond to the white noise and night-lights as you describe, but for others that is just torture.  Instead, they require absolute silence and absolute darkness.  Using earplugs and sleepmasks is fairly common--even in rooms that others would describe as "dark and quiet."  For them, even the indirect reflection of a single LED will keep them up for hours.

I also suggest a solid bed-time routine that starts at least an hour before bed-time.  A common problem with sleep is the "racing mind," and it can take a while to slow it down.  So no vigorous or mentally engaging activities for an hour before bedtime.  And when in bed, the child can try any number of sheep-counting exercises.  Not actual sheep-counting, because then you start thinking about sheep, and shearing, and shears, and farmers, and...  Think low-level self-hypnosis or relaxation exercises.  The child can count backwards, whisper "relax" with every breath, etc.

Again, it depends on the person--everyone is different.  See what works for you.
 
2013-07-16 05:07:57 PM  
Oh, look, it's this tired joke.

/still funny because it's goddamned true
//squirrel
 
2013-07-16 08:49:19 PM  

KellyX: Rambino: Smeggy Smurf:

Chew him out every time.  He'll get the idea in a hurry.  When he blows it, make him do something extremely boring that'll take a long time.  Something like cleaning the bathroom.  It'll drive him nuts but it'll get through his thick skull.

Not sure if trolling...?

If ADHD is at work, punishment will not change the behavior--only destroy the kid's self-confidence.  You might as well try to "chew out" a dwarf for being short.

Well, I'm looking for any advice at this point, GF doesn't want to do drugs (and I understand too) until she's closer to 12-13 (she's 9 right now), but the easily distracted issues are becoming very bad, the lack of listening, paying attention, easily losing attention, etc. Even teachers have voiced concern.

Yesterday she disappeared while I was at work and GF didn't know where she was cause she didn't bother to say and just disappeared because she encountered some other kids...


Look it's getting a lot of talk in hippie circles lately but a Gluten Free and Feingold diets have helped my hubby and my cousin out.

It is by no means a cure, my hubby claims that it "helps his brain feel less busy" and my cousin's grades and behavior improved greatly.

I would also look into cognitive behavioral therapy for her and maybe invest in noise cancelling headphones for her.
 
2013-07-16 10:27:39 PM  
Hold on, subby. That headline is making too much light of what is a serious disability which requires much mo...

SQUIRREL
 
2013-07-16 11:49:00 PM  

Aidan: Awesome!

The thing that bothers me most about ADHD (besides having to spell it like that even though folks in inattentive don't have much hyperactivity) is that it's so farking imprecise. My son's medication is ultimately based on whether I "feel" it's about right. And that changes almost from day to day. I'd pay through the nose to have some objective measurement of not only his ADD but also the effectiveness of any treatment.




Wow, lucky for your kid he doesn't need pain meds.
 
2013-07-17 12:01:37 AM  
For the snarky lot who say ADHD isn't legit then go take an upper-level psychiatry course in Learning & Behavioral Disorders and get back to me. ADHD isn't Asperger's which is unequivocally false, and the recent DSM-V proves that. Doesn't mean nothing is wrong with the former Aspies. Just means they're nothing special enough to warrant their own label.

Yeah, ADHD is over-diagnosed. People need to accept the fact their kid could simply be a kid, or a mere unintelligent scatterbrain. Not every kid is smart. The problem with stimulants is tolerance and addiction potential. What happens when the meds work to begin with, a tolerance builds, and the person gets frustrated which leads to them taking a higher dose without the doctor's approval? A cycle of abuse is stumbled upon.

A good way to tell if someone really has ADHD is if they smoke or drink. Especially nicotine. Nicotine effects people with ADHD differently because of brain chemistry. You can't fake brain chemistry. Alcohol and weed effects them differently too.

There's a reason the gene for ADHD is on the same gene as autism, bi-polar disorder, and schizophrenia. All of those are just a step or so below the next. The reason ADHD isn't grouped into the autism spectrum is that it is too different and unique. It isn't as severe as bi-polar even though the two are similar. The big difference is time and schematics. ADHD people have mood swings because of simple frustration. They'll realize how they're behaving, calm down, and that is that. Bi-polar has no real reason.

So, yes, it's legit. Yet, again, your child or loved one may simply be a dumb inattentive brat.

/psychology major
//has ADHD
 
2013-07-17 02:15:32 PM  

ParagonComplex: For the snarky lot who say ADHD isn't legit then go take an upper-level psychiatry course in Learning & Behavioral Disorders and get back to me. ADHD isn't Asperger's which is unequivocally false, and the recent DSM-V proves that. Doesn't mean nothing is wrong with the former Aspies. Just means they're nothing special enough to warrant their own label.

Yeah, ADHD is over-diagnosed. People need to accept the fact their kid could simply be a kid, or a mere unintelligent scatterbrain. Not every kid is smart. The problem with stimulants is tolerance and addiction potential. What happens when the meds work to begin with, a tolerance builds, and the person gets frustrated which leads to them taking a higher dose without the doctor's approval? A cycle of abuse is stumbled upon.

A good way to tell if someone really has ADHD is if they smoke or drink. Especially nicotine. Nicotine effects people with ADHD differently because of brain chemistry. You can't fake brain chemistry. Alcohol and weed effects them differently too.

There's a reason the gene for ADHD is on the same gene as autism, bi-polar disorder, and schizophrenia. All of those are just a step or so below the next. The reason ADHD isn't grouped into the autism spectrum is that it is too different and unique. It isn't as severe as bi-polar even though the two are similar. The big difference is time and schematics. ADHD people have mood swings because of simple frustration. They'll realize how they're behaving, calm down, and that is that. Bi-polar has no real reason.

So, yes, it's legit. Yet, again, your child or loved one may simply be a dumb inattentive brat.

/psychology major
//has ADHD


Ok, the nicotine/booze/weed thing is new to me...how is it different?
 
2013-07-17 03:33:25 PM  
"Ok, the nicotine/booze/weed thing is new to me...how is it different? "

I haven't heard that one either, I have ADD and I can drink about one alcoholic drink before I get an instant thumping headache. My brain is wired differently, maybe the booze messes with the wiring...
 
2013-07-17 06:51:02 PM  

JinxofSpades: Ok, the nicotine/booze/weed thing is new to me...how is it different?


Nicotine for some people would relax them, calm their nerves. For others it could provide focus and energy as well as those other things. It's all about the brain chemistry. One question a psychiatrist asks if they're worth their money is whether or not you smoke, and if so, what does it do for you. People with underlying/undiagnosed mental disorders that smoke are self-medicating without even realizing it.
 
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