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16367 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jul 2013 at 3:48 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-16 02:47:54 AM  
irreverentradio.com

Will eyebleach help?

 
2013-07-16 03:11:05 AM  
Is that a man, baby?
 
2013-07-16 03:49:05 AM  
NOPE
 
2013-07-16 03:52:59 AM  
i.cdn.turner.com
 
2013-07-16 03:54:12 AM  

GeneralJim: Will eyebleach help?


Doubt eye bleach helps eye cancer, but Im sure it helps erectile dysfunction.
 
2013-07-16 03:57:38 AM  
i.dailymail.co.uk
Worst Photoshop EVAR
 
2013-07-16 04:02:29 AM  
Why is there a picture of Dudley Moore in this article?
 
2013-07-16 04:05:33 AM  
Why did they think David Tennant in drag would make this article any better?
 
2013-07-16 04:08:37 AM  
Well that's just great. If I wasn't already at serious risk as a red headed white guy in Hawaii whose hobbies are swimming and free diving, now I have to worry about cancer on my EYES???

I hope sunglasses, rash guards and a lot of sunscreen can keep me safe, but really? Now I have to worry about cancer on my eyes? WTF?
 
2013-07-16 04:17:43 AM  

adamatari: Well that's just great. If I wasn't already at serious risk as a red headed white guy in Hawaii whose hobbies are swimming and free diving, now I have to worry about cancer on my EYES???

I hope sunglasses, rash guards and a lot of sunscreen can keep me safe, but really? Now I have to worry about cancer on my eyes? WTF?


Yet another Ginger farker.
 
2013-07-16 04:23:08 AM  
This is why I always keep my eyes closed when I'm outside.....
 
2013-07-16 04:40:13 AM  
may I draw everyone's attention to this handy guide to the daily fail, which should put your cancer-related fears at rest

http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Daily_Mail
 
2013-07-16 04:47:48 AM  
Aunt Jackie from Roseanne has eye cancer? Ohhh no.
 
2013-07-16 05:11:39 AM  

puffy999: [i.cdn.turner.com image 400x300]


perfect reference for this time of night.  Bravo, sir.
 
2013-07-16 05:29:00 AM  
And that's why they still have to make glass eyes often. We've gotten good about covering our eyes in industrial and lab settings, but if you don't wear rated sunglasses there's still UV exposure.

The fact they had a straightforward treatment means more people can keep their eye. Well, at least if you have coverage.
 
2013-07-16 05:36:17 AM  
wildcardjack: And that's why they still have to make glass eyes often. We've gotten good about covering our eyes in industrial and lab settings, but if you don't wear rated sunglasses

I wear my sunglasses at night.
So I can so I can
Keep the cancer rays out of my eyes
 
Skr
2013-07-16 06:07:40 AM  
Looks like Rod Stewart in a bad wig to me.
 
2013-07-16 06:32:09 AM  

Oldiron_79: adamatari: Well that's just great. If I wasn't already at serious risk as a red headed white guy in Hawaii whose hobbies are swimming and free diving, now I have to worry about cancer on my EYES???

I hope sunglasses, rash guards and a lot of sunscreen can keep me safe, but really? Now I have to worry about cancer on my eyes? WTF?

Yet another Ginger farker.


Hey! Don't use the G-word - it's offensive!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dQt2SAnTQc
 
2013-07-16 06:45:17 AM  

GenericLifeform: Why is there a picture of Dudley Moore in this article?


Maybe Richard Hammond?
 
2013-07-16 07:05:28 AM  
Robert Carlyle does not suit that haircut.
 
2013-07-16 07:06:18 AM  

prjindigo: GenericLifeform: Why is there a picture of Dudley Moore in this article?

Maybe Richard Hammond?


As I said above, I was thinking David Tennant, but...oh god, you're right.
 
2013-07-16 07:11:09 AM  
i263.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-16 07:35:36 AM  

maram500: prjindigo: GenericLifeform: Why is there a picture of Dudley Moore in this article?

Maybe Richard Hammond?

As I said above, I was thinking David Tennant, but...oh god, you're right.


Are you two having a laugh? Looks nothing like Hammond, but it is clearly Dudley Moore.
 
2013-07-16 07:45:42 AM  
Wasn't he in Queen?
 
2013-07-16 07:52:33 AM  
With helpful picture of what a cancerous eye looks like, after the tumor is removed...
 
2013-07-16 08:27:07 AM  
This is a good reason to replace your lenses of normal glasses every few years as their UV protection wears off when the lenses are cleaned.
 
2013-07-16 08:44:22 AM  

maram500: prjindigo: GenericLifeform: Why is there a picture of Dudley Moore in this article?

Maybe Richard Hammond?

As I said above, I was thinking David Tennant, but...oh god, you're right.


It's Laurie Metcalf.....  Jakie Rossane's Sister
  encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com

/I had to Google to know that
//Google search results suggested Laur Metcalf's feet.
///Apparently WikiFeet is a thing.
 
2013-07-16 09:12:15 AM  
She's not the only one...
assets.rollingstone.com
 
2013-07-16 09:29:07 AM  
i.dailymail.co.uk

tbivision.com
 
2013-07-16 09:33:28 AM  
 
2013-07-16 09:53:52 AM  
i.dailymail.co.uk

Just a small town girl
Living in a lonely world
She took the midnight train
Going anywhere
Just a city boy
Born and raised in South Detroit
He took the midnight train
Going anywhere
 
2013-07-16 09:59:06 AM  
George Stephanopolus in a wig.
 
2013-07-16 10:23:04 AM  
As a victim of ocular melanoma (and not a crossdresser, NTTAWWT), my doctors (very good ones, at one of two places in the US to really treat this) explained that nobody knows why these tumors form.

My cancer was inside my eye, discovered when I went for an eye exam to get new glasses. The optometrist pointed out that I had lost some peripheral vision in one eye (demonstrated it quite convincingly) and referred me to a retinal specialist, who, in turn, delivered the bad news - I had a lump inside my eye. The lump was 6mm, along the back left side of the right eye (essentially blocking the peripheral vision between 9 and 12 o'clock). Treatment involved placing a radioactive plaque on my eye for a week, under where the tumor was. Since this was behind my eye, it meant they basically pulled my eye out to do this. They followed up with laser treatments to burn out the edges of the tumor.

The treatment also meant I'd lose much of the vision in that eye  (radiation also kills much of the optic nerve), and with the treatment 3 years past, my vision is very spotty, like looking through a pane of glass covered in water droplets - but you can't simply look around the droplets. I'll never be able to read with that eye again... but at least my eye is still there (the alternative, had the tumor been larger, was to remove the eye). The cancer had not metastasized, either.

Melanoma is considered pretty much the nastiest cancer. Ocular melanoma is even worse - detection is probably the key here. If my cancer had metastasized, I probably would have been counting my remaining life in days. It was pure luck that I did not put off my eye exam longer.
 
2013-07-16 10:35:09 AM  

LesserEvil: As a victim of ocular melanoma (and not a crossdresser, NTTAWWT), my doctors (very good ones, at one of two places in the US to really treat this) explained that nobody knows why these tumors form.

My cancer was inside my eye, discovered when I went for an eye exam to get new glasses. The optometrist pointed out that I had lost some peripheral vision in one eye (demonstrated it quite convincingly) and referred me to a retinal specialist, who, in turn, delivered the bad news - I had a lump inside my eye. The lump was 6mm, along the back left side of the right eye (essentially blocking the peripheral vision between 9 and 12 o'clock). Treatment involved placing a radioactive plaque on my eye for a week, under where the tumor was. Since this was behind my eye, it meant they basically pulled my eye out to do this. They followed up with laser treatments to burn out the edges of the tumor.

The treatment also meant I'd lose much of the vision in that eye  (radiation also kills much of the optic nerve), and with the treatment 3 years past, my vision is very spotty, like looking through a pane of glass covered in water droplets - but you can't simply look around the droplets. I'll never be able to read with that eye again... but at least my eye is still there (the alternative, had the tumor been larger, was to remove the eye). The cancer had not metastasized, either.

Melanoma is considered pretty much the nastiest cancer. Ocular melanoma is even worse - detection is probably the key here. If my cancer had metastasized, I probably would have been counting my remaining life in days. It was pure luck that I did not put off my eye exam longer.


Yikes.

My doctor found an oddity in my eye this past year that required a bit of extra imaging.  Fortunately, it
turned out to be nothing serious, but this was after having gone 2 years without my annual eye exam (that
thankfully my company eye plan covers 100%).

Thanks for reminding me that I shouldn't neglect it ever again, and I'm glad you're doing OK.
 
2013-07-16 10:35:53 AM  
Oh, and do you at least rock a cool eye patch once in a while now that you have a medical excuse for it?
 
2013-07-16 10:56:00 AM  

GenericLifeform: Why is there a picture of Dudley Moore in this article?


Actually Dudley Moore and Peter Cook as  Derek and Clive were the only people I've ever heard that were capable of making cancer hilarious.

I particularly like the version of Cancer on Derek and Clive (Live) which holds up well to this day.
 
2013-07-16 11:01:00 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: Oh, and do you at least rock a cool eye patch once in a while now that you have a medical excuse for it?


I should... but as I remind my kids when I buy games during the Steam Sales to increase my already huge game backlog, I am a reformed pirate. Arrrrrggghhh.

They made me wear a "shield" when I had the implanted radioactive "chip" - but it was an ugly thing that covered half my face, and even with the shield, I wasn't allowed to be in the same room with any other people or pets for more than 20 minutes. I had inquired about the effects of the radiation on my brain (since the thing was literally inches from it armed with radiation powerful enough to kill a cancerous tumor), and they said "oh, it's got gold shielding behind it, you will be fine." - but oddly enough, I did find a side effect - I lost a memory, or rather everything RELATED to a memory; I had a cat for about a year, and I remember absolutely nothing about it. I only figured out the missing memory when I asked my wife about a picture of a strange cat in our house on my digital camera. The reason we only had it a year should have been memorable - he had seizures and we had visited the vet numerous times before having to put him to sleep. I haven't determined any other missing memories, though. I figure a key neuron related to that pet was zapped by the radiation.
 
2013-07-16 11:06:20 AM  
During my annual eye exams following LASIK surgery my doctor (besides telling me he is exceptionally pleased with how my sight is now) stresses how important it is I wear polarizing sunglasses. Sunlight is bad enough for eyes, but apparently sunlight reflecting off surfaces like water is really bad as well.
 
2013-07-16 11:20:47 AM  

LesserEvil: DjangoStonereaver: Oh, and do you at least rock a cool eye patch once in a while now that you have a medical excuse for it?

I should... but as I remind my kids when I buy games during the Steam Sales to increase my already huge game backlog, I am a reformed pirate. Arrrrrggghhh.

They made me wear a "shield" when I had the implanted radioactive "chip" - but it was an ugly thing that covered half my face, and even with the shield, I wasn't allowed to be in the same room with any other people or pets for more than 20 minutes. I had inquired about the effects of the radiation on my brain (since the thing was literally inches from it armed with radiation powerful enough to kill a cancerous tumor), and they said "oh, it's got gold shielding behind it, you will be fine." - but oddly enough, I did find a side effect - I lost a memory, or rather everything RELATED to a memory; I had a cat for about a year, and I remember absolutely nothing about it. I only figured out the missing memory when I asked my wife about a picture of a strange cat in our house on my digital camera. The reason we only had it a year should have been memorable - he had seizures and we had visited the vet numerous times before having to put him to sleep. I haven't determined any other missing memories, though. I figure a key neuron related to that pet was zapped by the radiation.


Good thing you didn't find a pic of yourself with a busty woman in a bikini.

"Honestly, honey!  I have no memory of this!"

/Looks for any excuse to type out the phrase 'busty woman in a bikini'.
 
2013-07-16 11:31:59 AM  

LesserEvil: As a victim of ocular melanoma (and not a crossdresser, NTTAWWT), my doctors (very good ones, at one of two places in the US to really treat this) explained that nobody knows why these tumors form.

My cancer was inside my eye, discovered when I went for an eye exam to get new glasses. The optometrist pointed out that I had lost some peripheral vision in one eye (demonstrated it quite convincingly) and referred me to a retinal specialist, who, in turn, delivered the bad news - I had a lump inside my eye. The lump was 6mm, along the back left side of the right eye (essentially blocking the peripheral vision between 9 and 12 o'clock). Treatment involved placing a radioactive plaque on my eye for a week, under where the tumor was. Since this was behind my eye, it meant they basically pulled my eye out to do this. They followed up with laser treatments to burn out the edges of the tumor.

The treatment also meant I'd lose much of the vision in that eye  (radiation also kills much of the optic nerve), and with the treatment 3 years past, my vision is very spotty, like looking through a pane of glass covered in water droplets - but you can't simply look around the droplets. I'll never be able to read with that eye again... but at least my eye is still there (the alternative, had the tumor been larger, was to remove the eye). The cancer had not metastasized, either.

Melanoma is considered pretty much the nastiest cancer. Ocular melanoma is even worse - detection is probably the key here. If my cancer had metastasized, I probably would have been counting my remaining life in days. It was pure luck that I did not put off my eye exam longer.


Out of curiosity, where did you get treated? My wife works at Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis and designs treatment plans for this as well as other cancers.
 
2013-07-16 11:43:15 AM  

mark_bert: LesserEvil: As a victim of ocular melanoma (and not a crossdresser, NTTAWWT), my doctors (very good ones, at one of two places in the US to really treat this) explained that nobody knows why these tumors form.

My cancer was inside my eye, discovered when I went for an eye exam to get new glasses. The optometrist pointed out that I had lost some peripheral vision in one eye (demonstrated it quite convincingly) and referred me to a retinal specialist, who, in turn, delivered the bad news - I had a lump inside my eye. The lump was 6mm, along the back left side of the right eye (essentially blocking the peripheral vision between 9 and 12 o'clock). Treatment involved placing a radioactive plaque on my eye for a week, under where the tumor was. Since this was behind my eye, it meant they basically pulled my eye out to do this. They followed up with laser treatments to burn out the edges of the tumor.

The treatment also meant I'd lose much of the vision in that eye  (radiation also kills much of the optic nerve), and with the treatment 3 years past, my vision is very spotty, like looking through a pane of glass covered in water droplets - but you can't simply look around the droplets. I'll never be able to read with that eye again... but at least my eye is still there (the alternative, had the tumor been larger, was to remove the eye). The cancer had not metastasized, either.

Melanoma is considered pretty much the nastiest cancer. Ocular melanoma is even worse - detection is probably the key here. If my cancer had metastasized, I probably would have been counting my remaining life in days. It was pure luck that I did not put off my eye exam longer.

Out of curiosity, where did you get treated? My wife works at Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis and designs treatment plans for this as well as other cancers.


Kellogg Eye Center, Ocular Oncology at the University of Michigan hospital.

I met a woman there who had had the treatment 7 years before, without the benefit of the laser follow-up, which at least made me feel better about my recovery.

Laser treatments sucked, though. To "freeze" the eye muscles, they had to give me injections under the eye, which were pretty damn painful.

The whole experience ranked among my worst of possible life experiences, from a purely psychological perspective, because I hate things touching my eye (I cannot wear contacts), and all of a sudden, my eye was subjected to a lot of touching, including ultrasound probes across the surface of my eye.

From a treatment perspective, it was among the best - great doctors thorough diagnostics. The only sour note was their attempt to use MAPS for the removal of the "chip" - they had put me fully under for putting it in, and even though I'd "not care, nor remember being aware" for the removal, I still apparently was experiencing enough discomfort that they ended up putting me fully under during the removal operation. I entered that operation with a lot of anxiety, though to be honest, I only remember being wheeled in, then waking up hours later.
 
2013-07-16 11:44:51 AM  
Public Savant: Oldiron_79: adamatari: Well that's just great. If I wasn't already at serious risk as a red headed white guy in Hawaii whose hobbies are swimming and free diving, now I have to worry about cancer on my EYES???

I hope sunglasses, rash guards and a lot of sunscreen can keep me safe, but really? Now I have to worry about cancer on my eyes? WTF?

Yet another Ginger farker.

Hey! Don't use the G-word - it's offensive!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dQt2SAnTQc


Its offensive for non gingers to use it, but we get to use it. Kind of like black people get to call each other ni-bong
 
2013-07-16 11:55:25 AM  

MightyPez: During my annual eye exams following LASIK surgery my doctor (besides telling me he is exceptionally pleased with how my sight is now) stresses how important it is I wear polarizing sunglasses. Sunlight is bad enough for eyes, but apparently sunlight reflecting off surfaces like water is really bad as well.


Prior to having my corneas reshaped via an excimer laser, I read various post-surgery guides that indicated that everyone should ultraviolet-protecting sunglasses when outside during the day, not just individuals with photophobia.
 
2013-07-16 12:05:59 PM  

LesserEvil: mark_bert: LesserEvil: As a victim of ocular melanoma (and not a crossdresser, NTTAWWT), my doctors (very good ones, at one of two places in the US to really treat this) explained that nobody knows why these tumors form.

My cancer was inside my eye, discovered when I went for an eye exam to get new glasses. The optometrist pointed out that I had lost some peripheral vision in one eye (demonstrated it quite convincingly) and referred me to a retinal specialist, who, in turn, delivered the bad news - I had a lump inside my eye. The lump was 6mm, along the back left side of the right eye (essentially blocking the peripheral vision between 9 and 12 o'clock). Treatment involved placing a radioactive plaque on my eye for a week, under where the tumor was. Since this was behind my eye, it meant they basically pulled my eye out to do this. They followed up with laser treatments to burn out the edges of the tumor.

The treatment also meant I'd lose much of the vision in that eye  (radiation also kills much of the optic nerve), and with the treatment 3 years past, my vision is very spotty, like looking through a pane of glass covered in water droplets - but you can't simply look around the droplets. I'll never be able to read with that eye again... but at least my eye is still there (the alternative, had the tumor been larger, was to remove the eye). The cancer had not metastasized, either.

Melanoma is considered pretty much the nastiest cancer. Ocular melanoma is even worse - detection is probably the key here. If my cancer had metastasized, I probably would have been counting my remaining life in days. It was pure luck that I did not put off my eye exam longer.

Out of curiosity, where did you get treated? My wife works at Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis and designs treatment plans for this as well as other cancers.

Kellogg Eye Center, Ocular Oncology at the University of Michigan hospital.

I met a woman there who had had the treatment 7 years before, without the ben ...


Hopefully you are recovering well. My wife deals a lot with the radioactive implants (eyes, gyno, prostate, etc.) it's pretty impressive the stuff they can do.
 
2013-07-16 12:18:30 PM  

mark_bert: My wife deals a lot with the radioactive implants (eyes, gyno, prostate, etc.) it's pretty impressive the stuff they can do.


At first I thought you meant "deals with" as a patient...was hella confused for a second...
 
2013-07-16 12:19:37 PM  
First trip to the beach (Daytona) drove all night with three other miscreants. Yes, I'd had a little pull on the bottle when we got there at 7am. I went out on the beach, amazed at the sea (17yo). And promptly fell asleep. Just hiking shorts. Woke up around 2pm (July). Inside of my nose was burnt. My eyelids. Roof of my mouth.

Unhappy experience.
 
2013-07-16 12:25:37 PM  
I feel sorry for the dude.
 
2013-07-16 03:18:18 PM  

Loaf's Tray: mark_bert: My wife deals a lot with the radioactive implants (eyes, gyno, prostate, etc.) it's pretty impressive the stuff they can do.

At first I thought you meant "deals with" as a patient...was hella confused for a second...


I can see that being confusing. She works in the oncology field.
 
2013-07-16 05:12:56 PM  
img4.imageshack.us
 
2013-07-17 12:13:37 AM  
Damn. Menopause can be a cruel.
 
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