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(AZ Family)   The very first Air Force One plane that once shuttled President Eisenhower on cross-country voyages is now abandoned and forgotten in the Arizona desert quietly decomposing under the merciless sun. This may be some kind of metaphor   (azfamily.com) divider line 129
    More: Sad, Air Force One, President Eisenhower, Arizona, Sonoran Desert, hangars, Marana  
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16006 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2013 at 7:09 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-15 08:15:41 AM

padraig: My God it's just a plane ! Presidents are men, not saints ! No need to treat everything they touched as relics to be preserved.


There's an Obama and the Constitution joke in there somewhere .....
 
2013-07-15 08:16:32 AM

pissedoffmick: vygramul: Just like Obama to leave the symbol of the finest 20th century Republican president to sit and corrode in the sun like our rights in the courts.

how do people like you get through life without wearing a helmet?


Don't ride a bicycle or motorcycle, don't work in construction, don't join the military or police forces, don't be a guy shot out of a cannon, don't play football, hockey, bat in baseball, play polo, cricket, or be an extra in a Mad Max film.

That should suffice as a start.

I have to wonder, though, why you'd ask me for advice.
 
2013-07-15 08:16:51 AM

Tat'dGreaser: Are any other former Air Force One aircraft on display at any museum? No? Then I don't see the problem.


Yes, the VF-54C "Sacred Cow," FDR's plane that was the first official Army Air Corps presidential transport, is on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, along with Eisenhower's "Columbine III" and several others. The exhibit is currently closed due to sequestration cuts. :/

The supposed significance of this plane is that it's the first one to have the call sign "Air Force One." Eh.
 
2013-07-15 08:18:07 AM
Thanks Eisenbama!
 
2013-07-15 08:19:09 AM

mbillips: Yes, the VF-54C "Sacred Cow," FDR's plane that was the first official Army Air Corps presidential transport, is on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, along with Eisenhower's "Columbine III" and several others. The exhibit is currently closed due to sequestration cuts. :/

The supposed significance of this plane is that it's the first one to have the call sign "Air Force One." Eh.


Oh..........well THEN IT BELONGS IN A MUSEUM
 
2013-07-15 08:23:13 AM
Will be glad to take care of it.
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2013-07-15 08:28:46 AM

jayhawk88: Alternate Universe version of this article:

"YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK! US Government spending $12.3 million a year on needless upkeep for old war planes that haven't flown in 50 years!"


Came to say this. See it's already been handled
 
2013-07-15 08:31:44 AM
If we go around keeping every single thing that someone thinks is historically important we'll start to look like hoarders as a nation.

It's OK to let some things go.
 
2013-07-15 08:33:06 AM
All the while the military industrial complex is laughing at Ike and his feeble attempt to slow them down.
 
2013-07-15 08:39:09 AM
We could paint black, draw some skulls on it.
 
2013-07-15 08:40:22 AM

traylor: Fear_and_Loathing: A picture would have been nice, or a real article.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 481x599]


Do you have the original of that?
 
2013-07-15 08:43:29 AM

Bung_Howdy: MANY planes lie slowly decomposing in the desert... slowly being the key word




Yeah, no shiat. I'm sure most of those planes are as good as when I worked on jets.

Aluminum is awesome. Most abundent element on the planet for a reason.
 
2013-07-15 08:43:55 AM

Fear_and_Loathing: A picture would have been nice, or a real article.


photorecon.net
 
2013-07-15 08:50:17 AM

StoPPeRmobile: Bung_Howdy: MANY planes lie slowly decomposing in the desert... slowly being the key word

Yeah, no shiat. I'm sure most of those planes are as good as when I worked on jets.

Aluminum is awesome. Most abundent element on the planet for a reason.


Most abundant element?
 
2013-07-15 08:52:52 AM
President Eisenhower threatened to attack Area 51 over them telling him that the government had no jurisdiction over Area 51

Published on May 12, 2013

In a gripping testimonial, an ailing former member of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has talked via video for the first time publicly about his experience dealing with extraterrestrials, their craft and a cover-up.

The 15 minute prerecorded video of an anonymous former senior CIA officer was broadcast May 3 on the final day of the week long Citizen Hearing on Disclosure. The 77-year-old man, though he was articulate, and sitting up as he spoke, was obviously in a poor state of health. He worked for the CIA under President Dwight Eisenhower in 1958 and had chosen to break his long-held silence as he approached the end of his life.



Weird times...
 
2013-07-15 08:53:26 AM

JohnCarter: Fear_and_Loathing: A picture would have been nice, or a real article.

[photorecon.net image 850x566]


Was it flown by Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold?
 
2013-07-15 09:00:40 AM

mbillips: Why did Eisenhower name his plane after a school shooting?


Because "Akelei" was already taken by the Nazis.
 
2013-07-15 09:03:35 AM
I'm guessing it's this one.

32°24'42.94" N 111°13'24.66" W
 
2013-07-15 09:03:44 AM

neversubmit: President Eisenhower threatened to attack Area 51 over them telling him that the government had no jurisdiction over Area 51

Published on May 12, 2013

In a gripping testimonial, an ailing former member of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has talked via video for the first time publicly about his experience dealing with extraterrestrials, their craft and a cover-up.

The 15 minute prerecorded video of an anonymous former senior CIA officer was broadcast May 3 on the final day of the week long Citizen Hearing on Disclosure. The 77-year-old man, though he was articulate, and sitting up as he spoke, was obviously in a poor state of health. He worked for the CIA under President Dwight Eisenhower in 1958 and had chosen to break his long-held silence as he approached the end of his life.


Weird times...

theweirdlywiredworld.comSeems legit.
 
2013-07-15 09:06:16 AM
I thought this one was at the Pima Air Force Museum, but they've apparently got the Kennedy/LBJ DC-6. Things don't exactly decay in Arizona, which makes it perfect for mothballed bombers.

I live about an hour from the Air Force Museum in Dayton, so I'm spoiled for cool aircraft. I remember going out to the annex to see Columbine years ago.
 
2013-07-15 09:07:47 AM

Lady Indica: So. the. fark. what.

Do we, as a nation, need to be on Hoarders? We don't have to save every farking little thing. Not everything is of major importance to generations to come.


But how else will we shame the citizenry and convince them that these are the end times?

/never did understand how 'everyone should lament about the state of the world' made sense to advertisers
//unless melancholy people buy more things?
///three
 
2013-07-15 09:08:05 AM
I'm working on a Connie restoration right now, so I'm getting a kick....
 
2013-07-15 09:10:11 AM

mbillips: Seems legit.


That's what I first thought then I read the comments and they are mostly negative, so...
 
2013-07-15 09:13:08 AM

Mock26: Also, I am pretty sure that President Eisenhower no longer needs a plane.


Especially after building all those highways and stuff.
 
2013-07-15 09:14:37 AM
galactic.no
 
2013-07-15 09:16:20 AM

riffraff: I'm working on a Connie restoration right now, so I'm getting a kick....


So is Basil.
 
2013-07-15 09:16:28 AM
Wow, I am as briefed after reading the article as I was after I read the headline.

No photos of said plane, no mention of what type of plane it is, etc.

Great article...
 
2013-07-15 09:19:07 AM
I love planes.  I love historic planes.  I have worked around historic planes for over 20 years, including now volunteering for over the last 5 years in the conservation of static military aircraft.  I am a pilot and flight instructor.  My bookshelf has over 3000 nerd books about airplanes and my model airplanecollection is so large as to be embarassing.

And yet, even I recognize that there's something wrong when there are probably 2000-3000  preserved/historic aircraft on display in the USA... and barely a peep of a monument to labor, slavery, and the like.

Consider the F111.  It's a nice plane, but it's hardly what you can consider to be important.  Its most significant mission was the "El Dorado Canyon" mission against Libya, where one was shot down.   And yet, there are *40* of them on display worldwide.  Commemorating, what, exactly?   Robert McNamara's insistence of "one plane to rule them all" which ended up doing many jobs poorly and only a few well, much like the upcoming F-35?   Ok, maybe it's not commemorating anything beyond the otherwise pretty pedestrian service of those who, say, served at Cannona AFB for a while, maybe it's just a cool plane (which it is), but FFS, at least can we have the honesty to admit that?

A lot of aviation museums badly fail in providing context to their exhibits.  If you want to see a well done aviation museum, check out the cold war building of the RAF museum, Cosford UK, which puts the airplanes into the context of the times with stuff that is educational for all ages.   If you want to see a poorly done exhibit, look no further than any museum where the aircraft are tied up with not much more than... other aircraft.   As much as its collection is outstanding, even the Udvar Hazy museum in DC edges into the latter territory.

Let's not lament an old presidential transport in the desert.  Let's instead build a national museum of slavery and civil rights (desperately needed as a 'move on' capstone and the subject matter is large enough to warrant its own museum)--if not in DC then at least in Atlanta which would welcome it, a national museum of Music (much needed, complete with extensive online resources), a national museum of industry and labor (the smithsonian covers this to some extent)...

or, better yet, help OTHER countries build critical museums through itnernational cooperation.  how about a memorial to communist/khmer victims in cambodia or eastern ukraine?  how about travelling science museums in africa?
 
2013-07-15 09:30:13 AM

pissedoffmick: vygramul: Just like Obama to leave the symbol of the finest 20th century Republican president to sit and corrode in the sun like our rights in the courts.

how do people like you get through life without wearing a helmet?


How do you not recognize the trolling? I'd give him 0/10, but you bit.
 
2013-07-15 09:32:05 AM
Given how many people have given money to keep the rustbucket USS United States afloat in Philly, I am shocked that someone hasn't snatched the plane up with the misguided notion that a presidential plane museum would be the gateway to claiming a casino and an aquarium would solve all of the town's financial problems..
 
2013-07-15 09:34:59 AM
I like history as much, if not more, than the next guy but do we really need to save every old plane care widget, building or even pyramid? Historical designations are given out far to freely as it is.
 
2013-07-15 09:37:31 AM
A metaphor of what happens to those that oppose the military industrial complex.
 
2013-07-15 09:37:54 AM

Bomb Head Mohammed: I love planes.  I love historic planes.  I have worked around historic planes for over 20 years, including now volunteering for over the last 5 years in the conservation of static military aircraft.  I am a pilot and flight instructor.  My bookshelf has over 3000 nerd books about airplanes and my model airplanecollection is so large as to be embarassing.

And yet, even I recognize that there's something wrong when there are probably 2000-3000  preserved/historic aircraft on display in the USA... and barely a peep of a monument to labor, slavery, and the like.

Consider the F111.  It's a nice plane, but it's hardly what you can consider to be important.  Its most significant mission was the "El Dorado Canyon" mission against Libya, where one was shot down.   And yet, there are *40* of them on display worldwide.  Commemorating, what, exactly?   Robert McNamara's insistence of "one plane to rule them all" which ended up doing many jobs poorly and only a few well, much like the upcoming F-35?   Ok, maybe it's not commemorating anything beyond the otherwise pretty pedestrian service of those who, say, served at Cannona AFB for a while, maybe it's just a cool plane (which it is), but FFS, at least can we have the honesty to admit that?

A lot of aviation museums badly fail in providing context to their exhibits.  If you want to see a well done aviation museum, check out the cold war building of the RAF museum, Cosford UK, which puts the airplanes into the context of the times with stuff that is educational for all ages.   If you want to see a poorly done exhibit, look no further than any museum where the aircraft are tied up with not much more than... other aircraft.   As much as its collection is outstanding, even the Udvar Hazy museum in DC edges into the latter territory.

Let's not lament an old presidential transport in the desert.  Let's instead build a national museum of slavery and civil rights (desperately needed as a 'move on' capstone and the subject matter is ...




People want to remember their achievements, not their failures.
Planes represent our engineering and wartime prowess. They represent the best of our abilities. They represent adventure, wealth, success, and general sexiness.
Its very easy to display a plane in neutral context.

Trying to talk about slavery, the holocaust, or other forms of social disaster is a much more controversial and complicated thing. How do you do it without tearing open old wounds or insulting people?
You could inadvertently glorify an atrocity if you start putting nazi war memorabilia on display next to chunks of barbed wire from their concentration camps.

Putting an ME-109 on display as a war trophy is relatively easy, compared.
 
2013-07-15 09:39:36 AM
Ozymandias

(seriously? 84 comments and no one got this?)
 
2013-07-15 09:39:57 AM
A meatphor for the processes by which globalization and capitalism erase history, I suppose.
 
2013-07-15 09:48:50 AM
I thought all the Air Force One's were at the national air force museum in Dayton, OH?

http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/exhibits/presidential/

This should be moved there with the rest of the Air Force One's in history.
 
2013-07-15 09:50:37 AM
There aren't many Connies left in flyable condition, it looks more or less complete, either restore it or use the parts to restore/keep flying other connies - those radial engines are getting hard to come by, as are period-correct instrumentation that works, amoung other things.  Even though its not a 'warplane' per se, a group such as the Commemorative Air Force might be interested in it, as not only is it a cool, historic, aircraft but could also be used to ferry around people and parts for all the other projects they're working on all over the country
 
2013-07-15 09:52:56 AM

robertmeerdahl: Ozymandias

(seriously? 84 comments and no one got this?)


Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!
 
2013-07-15 09:53:10 AM

JohnCarter: Fear_and_Loathing: A picture would have been nice, or a real article.

[photorecon.net image 850x566]


also..........

It is probably the one on the middle right.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-07-15 09:54:21 AM
We still have this:

www.fhwa.dot.gov
and that's pretty cool.

(Wait...there are interstate highways in Hawaii...?)
 
2013-07-15 09:55:31 AM
This is outrageous!
We must preserve every object any famous person ever touched.
 
2013-07-15 09:56:37 AM

neversubmit: A metaphor of what happens to those that oppose the military industrial complex.




Or those who oppose government funding science/academia (If you are going to quote use the whole quote):

"Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades.

In this revolution, research has become central, it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields. In the same fashion, the free university, historically the fountainhead of free ideas and scientific discovery, has experienced a revolution in the conduct of research. Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity. For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers.

The prospect of domination of the nation's scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present - and is gravely to be regarded.

Yet, in holding scientific research and discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite. "

Link
 
2013-07-15 09:59:03 AM
Ike had two Constellations. One is restored at the Pima air museum in Tucson.  The one at Pima is the first one he used.  Last time I was there you could go through it. I don't know why they need to preserve all of them.
 
2013-07-15 10:00:49 AM
Bomb Head Mohammed:
And yet, even I recognize that there's something wrong when there are probably 2000-3000  preserved/historic aircraft on display in the USA... and barely a peep of a monument to labor, slavery, and the like.

Let's not lament an old presidential transport in the desert.  Let's instead build a national museum of slavery and civil rights (desperately needed as a 'move on' capstone and the subject matter is ...


State of Maine had a mural recognizing Labor. The (R) Gov. had them taken down because private business complained that it was a nod towards Unions. (Article)
 
2013-07-15 10:03:07 AM

mbillips: Tat'dGreaser: Are any other former Air Force One aircraft on display at any museum? No? Then I don't see the problem.

Yes, the VF-54C "Sacred Cow," FDR's plane that was the first official Army Air Corps presidential transport, is on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, along with Eisenhower's "Columbine III" and several others. The exhibit is currently closed due to sequestration cuts. :/

The supposed significance of this plane is that it's the first one to have the call sign "Air Force One." Eh.


The Museum of Flight in Seattle has SAM 970 on display, the first VC-137B used as Air Force One. It is set up so you can tour the interior.

/They also have an A-12 with the cool-looking drone attached to the back.
 
2013-07-15 10:03:30 AM

drink_chai: I thought all the Air Force One's were at the national air force museum in Dayton, OH?

http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/exhibits/presidential/

This should be moved there with the rest of the Air Force One's in history.


No, only a small selection are there. Eisenhower had three planes that carried him around; only one of them is on display. They display a single example of each presidential airframe since FDR's C-54, not every single plane. The 747 has been use use for 23 years, and the 707 for 32 years before that. There have been only five Air Force models used (C-54, C-118, Constellation, 707, 747), but more than a dozen airframes.

/Air Force One is the call sign when the president's aboard; not the name of the plane. If he's not aboard, it's referred to by its tail number or by another package call sign (e.g. Air Force Two if the VP is aboard).
//TheMoreYouKnow.jpg
 
2013-07-15 10:03:43 AM
A contractor who serves as the aircraft's caretaker is looking for a museum willing to take it and restore it.

Has he tried the Smithsonian yet?  Just saying...
 
2013-07-15 10:04:16 AM
In the meanwhile, the Presidential Wing at the Air Force Museum is closed due to sequester cuts.  It includes the plane that took JFK to Dallas and a half-dozen others that served the presidents.  You can actually walk in to several of them.

/can't stand the new name of the museum
//unmelodious
 
2013-07-15 10:05:24 AM

drink_chai: I thought all the Air Force One's were at the national air force museum in Dayton, OH?

http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/exhibits/presidential/

This should be moved there with the rest of the Air Force One's in history.


Kennedy's SAM970 is at Boeing Field and Regan's is at the Presidential library in Simi Valley.
 
2013-07-15 10:05:25 AM

stucka: Fear_and_Loathing: A picture would have been nice, or a real article.

It's linked: <A HREF="http://azstarnet.com/news/local/northwest/st-air-force-one-fade s-in-ma rana/article_ad5c6ede-200e-5960-9759-286afac692d5.html" target="_blank">http://azstarnet.com/news/local/northwest/st-air-forc e-one-fades-in-ma rana/article_ad5c6ede-200e-5960-9759-286afac692d5.html </A>


You don't need javascript to load a single image. I'm assuming they did that since I see no picture. So again, a picture would have been nice.
 
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