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(Guardian)   Crime author's Polyjuice potion wears off   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, J. K. Rowling, crime writer, crime novels, debut novel, Publishers Weekly  
•       •       •

3550 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 14 Jul 2013 at 11:32 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-14 11:20:31 AM  
But I've been told that Rowling was a hack writer and that anything she wrote after the  Potter series would only sell because of her name.
 
2013-07-14 11:38:00 AM  
The book sold 1,500 copies? I bet they saw some weak numbers and revealed the author to boost sales.
 
2013-07-14 11:54:11 AM  

Dinki: But I've been told that Rowling was a hack writer and that anything she wrote after the  Potter series would only sell because of her name.


You're half right; despite good reviews, the book didn't sell until it was revealed that Rowling is the author.
 
2013-07-14 12:03:53 PM  

Robert1966: Dinki: But I've been told that Rowling was a hack writer and that anything she wrote after the  Potter series would only sell because of her name.

You're half right; despite good reviews, the book didn't sell until it was revealed that Rowling is the author.


I'm betting that most new authors don't sell well, especially in a genre as crowded as crime drama. Name recognition helps in just about any industry.
 
2013-07-14 12:07:28 PM  
CCancer of the pseudonym
 
2013-07-14 12:26:21 PM  
She should just start trolling, write a new Harry Potter book under a nom de plume, make everyone think it is Fan Fiction and see the reviews.
 
2013-07-14 12:27:13 PM  

Fano: CCancer of the pseudonym


I love Uncle Stevie,  He has such a way with words.
 
2013-07-14 01:06:24 PM  

Dinki: Robert1966: Dinki: But I've been told that Rowling was a hack writer and that anything she wrote after the  Potter series would only sell because of her name.

You're half right; despite good reviews, the book didn't sell until it was revealed that Rowling is the author.

I'm betting that most new authors don't sell well, especially in a genre as crowded as crime drama. Name recognition helps in just about any industry.


Pretty much.  Look at James Patterson.  Anything with his name on it sells.  Doesn't matter if it's virtually the same as his last 30 books.
 
2013-07-14 01:37:47 PM  

Tom_Slick: She should just start trolling, write a new Harry Potter book under a nom de plume, make everyone think it is Fan Fiction and see the reviews.


TThe 50 shades of grey author should go totally meta
 
2013-07-14 03:01:21 PM  

Dinki: But I've been told that Rowling was a hack writer and that anything she wrote after the  Potter series would only sell because of her name.

 So far, she's written a bunch of genre fiction plus one book that was ripped apart by critics.
To be fair, though, book critics are universally awful.  Great literature takes a long time to appreciate, and everything else gets graded on a different scale, so reviews become nearly worthless unless you already know if an author is good or not.  If someone has already written ten novels, then you can bet that the review of the next one is going to say that it's good but not as good as some other book by the same author and so-and-so is losing his touch, et cetera.Still, she's famous for writing children's books.  She's comparable to Terry Pratchett, not Thomas Pynchon.
 
2013-07-14 03:03:34 PM  
I actually read 'The Cuckoo's Crossing' because two guys in my book club recommended it. It's a book club for mystery fans called the Thursday Night Coven. You must be able to solve a 'Murder, She Wrote' before the second commercial break and own a cat to qualify for membership, and we meet every other Thursday at the coffeeshop by the library. It's mostly ladies, but we do have some men. And darned if two of them weren't going on and on about this Robert Galbraith writer.

I enjoyed it, found the detective to be pretty well-created (on par with Lillian Jackson Braun's James Qwilleran in terms of likable realism and as unexpectedly-capable as Lord Peter Wimsey, but not so quirky as, say, Poirot, nor as obnoxious as Holmes,) the plot was engaging and a good challenge (I'll admit that I didn't guess whodunnit, which is rare for me and speaks well of the writer,) and the dialogue was remarkably funny in places, which is a challenge some mystery writers these days can't manage. It's either the ridiculously-precious warm-fuzzies from the Cozy Mystery genre or it's the black comedy of the dark ones, both of which might make some readers want to hork. This was a nice middle ground and the whole Coven enjoyed it.

And now it turns out it was J.K. Rowling. I won't be so smug as to say 'I knew it!' when it IS a surprise, but at the same time, it's a pleasant surprise, and re-reading it, now I can kind of tell.

Well, me and all the other under-thirties and over-sixties who've been told for years that the Harry Potters don't and can't count as decent mysteries and that J.K.R. is a hack are going to have a grand old laugh at the smug Robert Galbraith-fan Boomers' expense, let me tell you! I read TFA and actually called up the nice older librarian who dresses as Minerva McGonagall for Halloween just so I could hear her reaction early. ("Spidey, is this a joke?" "No, really. Check your email." "Oh, my stars and garters! I never would have thought! Oh, won't Len and Barry be pissed?") So we thought we'd ask the coffeeshop to make up some of the butterbeer they did for the last Potter movie opening on Thursday, just so we can toast the new book properly, and that's delicious enough it should soothe the wounded egos of the Galbraith-fans after we've had our laugh.

Also, we should probably buy up the rest of the first editions while we can. If the sales go up, those could be valuable enough for our annual First Editions charity auction. This year we're hoping to raise $500 for our new Books Behind Bars drive, really buy some enjoyable things for the prisoners.
 
2013-07-14 03:05:41 PM  
You guys are morons... 1,500 hardcover books sales for a nobody is a farking landslide. It is more likely other literati were trying to contact "him" to arrange a talk or interview and got sick of the dead ends.  One "can you do me a favor?" call to a buddy in investigative journalism and someone is going to crack..
 
2013-07-14 03:05:42 PM  

Fano: Tom_Slick: She should just start trolling, write a new Harry Potter book under a nom de plume, make everyone think it is Fan Fiction and see the reviews.

TThe 50 shades of grey author should go totally meta


50 Shades of Harry Potter by Clit Eastwood.
 
2013-07-14 04:04:06 PM  

Tom_Slick: She should just start trolling, write a new Harry Potter book under a nom de plume, make everyone think it is Fan Fiction and see the reviews.


She already did that.  Her pseudonym was Tara Gillesbie.
 
2013-07-14 04:09:23 PM  

SpiderQueenDemon: And now it turns out it was J.K. Rowling. I won't be so smug as to say 'I knew it!' when it IS a surprise, but at the same time, it's a pleasant surprise, and re-reading it, now I can kind of tell.


Speaking of YA authors who have written adult crime stories. Have you ever read any of Rick Riordan's "Tres Navarre" novels? I think he is a better children's lit writer than JKR. So I was wondering if it translated to his adult stuff as well.
 
2013-07-14 05:46:01 PM  
Richard Bachmann.
 
2013-07-14 05:46:15 PM  
The Cuckoo's Calling, billed as the debut novel of Galbraith, a pseudonym for a man with a background in the army and the civilian security industry, won praise from crime writers and critics who hailed the author as a new force in the genre.

The skeptical side of me says that word got out.
 
2013-07-14 07:34:57 PM  

Pentaxian: Speaking of YA authors who have written adult crime stories. Have you ever read any of Rick Riordan's "Tres Navarre" novels? I think he is a better children's lit writer than JKR. So I was wondering if it translated to his adult stuff as well.


I have, and they're splendid! He even manages to write the cat believably! I read one on a plane ride to Texas and was a lot better prepared for what it's like there for having read them. Sort of like how reading Christopher Moore can prepare one for San Francisco. I'd definitely add them to the proverbial wishlist or request the first one through your library.

(With the price of books and the limited amounts of remaining shelf space these days, I only buy a book to read if I've either A. read it already and want it for my e-reader thingy or B. know someone with a birthday coming up who'd like it in case I don't, in which case I get it in tree-meat and read it with white gloves on. Unless it's the latest in a beloved series, that I'll just buy outright.)
 
2013-07-14 10:09:53 PM  
Well, it's time for a hipster to chime in and say how they have never read anything by JK Rowling.

So I guess I will- I have never read any of the Harry Potter books and have not read The Cuckoo's Calling.

But when I first heard this story this morning, I went and read reviews of the new book before they were altered by the fact that JKR wrote the book and not some unknown writer, and most of the reviews were very favorable. I also used to defend her popularity with the Potter books, as over the 10 years or so it took to write them she kept most of her original fans and added a lot of new ones. Not bad for any author.

Neither Harry Potter nor crime dramas are genre's I am particularly drawn to, but it looks like she has done an above average job at both. She may not end up being remembered as a great author 100 years from now, but I bet she is remembered. And that makes her a very good author, at least.
 
2013-07-15 12:00:42 AM  
This is pretty cool. I love her writing. I love how here writing evolved over the course of the Harry Potter series. I read Casual Vacancies. It was an interesting story which obviously found roots in her personal experioence.

I look forward to reading this new series. I am huge fan of mysteries. I wish I had found this book before she was outed. It would have been interesting to read it with a different mindset.
 
2013-07-15 12:05:03 AM  

SpiderQueenDemon: I have, and they're splendid! He even manages to write the cat believably! I read one on a plane ride to Texas and was a lot better prepared for what it's like there for having read them. Sort of like how reading Christopher Moore can prepare one for San Francisco. I'd definitely add them to the proverbial wishlist or request the first one through your library.


"She's so small, yet she contains so much evil." (I don't know if this applies to you I just wanted to use that Christopher Moore quote)

I have go with your recommendation since you have a discerning enough palate to read Christopher Moore. He is also a writer with mad skillz, yo.

/Beta male
 
2013-07-15 12:33:15 AM  

SpiderQueenDemon: I actually read 'The Cuckoo's Crossing' because two guys in my book club recommended it. It's a book club for mystery fans called the Thursday Night Coven. You must be able to solve a 'Murder, She Wrote' before the second commercial break and own a cat to qualify for membership, and we meet every other Thursday at the coffeeshop by the library. It's mostly ladies, but we do have some men. And darned if two of them weren't going on and on about this Robert Galbraith writer.

I enjoyed it, found the detective to be pretty well-created (on par with Lillian Jackson Braun's James Qwilleran in terms of likable realism and as unexpectedly-capable as Lord Peter Wimsey, but not so quirky as, say, Poirot, nor as obnoxious as Holmes,) the plot was engaging and a good challenge (I'll admit that I didn't guess whodunnit, which is rare for me and speaks well of the writer,) and the dialogue was remarkably funny in places, which is a challenge some mystery writers these days can't manage. It's either the ridiculously-precious warm-fuzzies from the Cozy Mystery genre or it's the black comedy of the dark ones, both of which might make some readers want to hork. This was a nice middle ground and the whole Coven enjoyed it.

And now it turns out it was J.K. Rowling. I won't be so smug as to say 'I knew it!' when it IS a surprise, but at the same time, it's a pleasant surprise, and re-reading it, now I can kind of tell.

Well, me and all the other under-thirties and over-sixties who've been told for years that the Harry Potters don't and can't count as decent mysteries and that J.K.R. is a hack are going to have a grand old laugh at the smug Robert Galbraith-fan Boomers' expense, let me tell you! I read TFA and actually called up the nice older librarian who dresses as Minerva McGonagall for Halloween just so I could hear her reaction early. ("Spidey, is this a joke?" "No, really. Check your email." "Oh, my stars and garters! I never would have thought! Oh, won't Len and Barry be pisse ...


I...I read the entire thing thinking I was being Pocket Ninja'd but then there was no punch line.  Sounds like a fun group, though.
 
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