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(Buzzfeed)   Twelve innovations from the 1950s that are still used today, like credit cards and diet pop. Who knew people were getting to debt in the 50s?   (buzzfeed.com) divider line 43
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4683 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Jul 2013 at 4:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-13 04:31:59 PM
If something works well enough, why would there be any surprise that it's still in use today?

// pencils are from the 1500s and you can still run down to your office supply store of choice and grab some.
 
2013-07-13 04:40:11 PM
It was easy enough to get in debt before that, Subby. You could buy things from stores on time payments, or go to finance companies (short-term loans were very common in the days before credit cards and payday loans.)

It's actually too bad those aren't still popular. The old way was better.
 
2013-07-13 04:44:37 PM
3. Roll-on deodorant (1952)


They missed the point. It wasn't the product that was an innovation. The innovation was using advertising to get people to feel bad enough about themselves to buy a product they didn't really need.
 
2013-07-13 04:46:36 PM
getting to debt?
 
2013-07-13 04:48:19 PM

pdieten: It was easy enough to get in debt before that, Subby. You could buy things from stores on time payments, or go to finance companies (short-term loans were very common in the days before credit cards and payday loans.)

It's actually too bad those aren't still popular. The old way was better.


Borrowing from Jews?
 
2013-07-13 04:49:49 PM

mcreadyblue: pdieten: It was easy enough to get in debt before that, Subby. You could buy things from stores on time payments, or go to finance companies (short-term loans were very common in the days before credit cards and payday loans.)

It's actually too bad those aren't still popular. The old way was better.

Borrowing from Jews?


No we still do that.
 
2013-07-13 05:06:22 PM
www.barcoding.com

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-07-13 05:15:43 PM
Remember: marketing is not about selling a product, it's about selling the fear of NOT HAVING your product.
 
2013-07-13 05:16:04 PM
rickrondeau.com
 
2013-07-13 05:17:55 PM
My stepfather actually had Diners Club. Nobody took the damn thing, either.

pdieten: It was easy enough to get in debt before that, Subby. You could buy things from stores on time payments, or go to finance companies (short-term loans were very common in the days before credit cards and payday loans.)

It's actually too bad those aren't still popular. The old way was better.


A payday loan is actually the definition of a short term loan, isn't it? The innovation was revolving consumer credit.
 
2013-07-13 05:28:45 PM
So, the Republican Party wants to take us back to pre-1957. Before birth control pills?
 
2013-07-13 05:29:53 PM

MFAWG: My stepfather actually had Diners Club. Nobody took the damn thing, either.

pdieten: It was easy enough to get in debt before that, Subby. You could buy things from stores on time payments, or go to finance companies (short-term loans were very common in the days before credit cards and payday loans.)

It's actually too bad those aren't still popular. The old way was better.

A payday loan is actually the definition of a short term loan, isn't it? The innovation was revolving consumer credit.


No, because the "short term loan" was more like a year or three, not two weeks.

Revolving credit is very nice but also very prone to abuse. Realize that every time you swipe a card you're taking out a loan. If you actually had to sit in front of a loan officer every single time you wanted to borrow money you'd probably think about it quite a bit harder than you would just swiping a card.
 
2013-07-13 05:43:46 PM

cashman: So, the Republican Party wants to take us back to pre-1957. Before birth control pills?




And before integration.
 
2013-07-13 05:44:04 PM
Some of the things on this list have changed since the 50's:

1. Diner's Club was a charge card. Today most people use credit cards instead.
5. Analog color TV was replaced entirely by digital TV in the US.
6. Microwaves traded in their dials for confusing digital keypads.
7. Automatic doors use motion sensors instead of floor mats.
12. Birth control pills were reformulated for safety reasons.
 
2013-07-13 05:44:52 PM
I can remember getting our first microwave in 1977. My aunt and uncle got one a few years before us and I always thought it was cool. Prior to that, you heated everything on the stove or in the oven. A lot of people, today, would be shocked if they had to do that.

I can also remember TV dinners being a rare treat. They took about 30 minutes to cook in the oven instead of a few minutes in the microwave, so they weren't really a major convenience. The best part was...we got to eat them on TV trays, on the couch, in front of the TV!
 
2013-07-13 06:33:10 PM
Diet poop?
Is that like fiat currency?
 
2013-07-13 06:53:43 PM

Kyosuke: 3. Roll-on deodorant (1952)

They missed the point. It wasn't the product that was an innovation. The innovation was using advertising to get people to feel bad enough about themselves to buy a product they didn't really need.


People bathed once a week back in the 50's...they NEEDED deodorant.
 
2013-07-13 07:42:30 PM
8. Velcro (1955)

Impossible! T'Mir didn't even land in Carbon Creek until 1957!

i1206.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-13 07:44:53 PM

PacManDreaming: I can remember getting our first microwave in 1977. My aunt and uncle got one a few years before us and I always thought it was cool. Prior to that, you heated everything on the stove or in the oven. A lot of people, today, would be shocked if they had to do that.

I can also remember TV dinners being a rare treat. They took about 30 minutes to cook in the oven instead of a few minutes in the microwave, so they weren't really a major convenience. The best part was...we got to eat them on TV trays, on the couch, in front of the TV!


I'm actually considering getting rid of my microwave since I rarely use it. I use my toaster oven and hot plate to do most of my cooking since all my food is bought fresh anyways. Plus the huge box is taking up valuable counter space in my 200 sq ft space.
 
2013-07-13 07:49:48 PM
They may have invented automatic doors in the 50's, but they still haven't perfected them.  Never seen one that didn't need to be repaired at least once or twice a year.  If you are lucky, it's only once or twice a year.  And no, those repairs are never covered by warranty.
 
2013-07-13 07:51:42 PM
American women were not using credit cards, at least their OWN credit cards, until after 1974.

They weren't allowed to be considered for credit cards!

http://msmagazine.com/blog/2013/05/28/10-things-that-american-women- co uld-not-do-before-the-1970s/
 
2013-07-13 08:36:38 PM
I thought revolving credit was ancient.  In the middle ages, banks had an arrangement with (rich) customers where they would be given a ceramic tile with their name on it and the limit of credit the bank was willing to extend.  If the customer exceeded the limit or failed to pay they would break the tile and refuse further business until the debt was paid, the customer was 'broke'.  Poor people didn't get credit, they got indentured servitude.  Kinda like today, only at arms length.

Of course, these are half-remembered bits of information from an Uncle Johns Bathroom Reader, so... plus I'm too lazy to google or wiki it.  So there's that.
 
2013-07-13 08:55:15 PM

lethological_lassie: American women were not using credit cards, at least their OWN credit cards, until after 1974.

They weren't allowed to be considered for credit cards!

http://msmagazine.com/blog/2013/05/28/10-things-that-american-women- co uld-not-do-before-the-1970s/


Weird, how come there was a Flintstones episode about it?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rqNZAIQH4U

Were they using the husband's card?
 
2013-07-13 08:57:46 PM
"Who knew people were getting to debt in the 50s?"

Anyone with a high school level education in history, other than that nobody.
 
2013-07-14 12:09:40 AM

MrEricSir: Some of the things on this list have changed since the 50's:

1. Diner's Club was a charge card. Today most people use credit cards instead.
5. Analog color TV was replaced entirely by digital TV in the US.
6. Microwaves traded in their dials for confusing digital keypads.
7. Automatic doors use motion sensors instead of floor mats.
12. Birth control pills were reformulated for safety reasons.


Most of the items on that list changed, but remained mostly the same.

2.Diet sodas have been reformulated to include different levels of sugar and calories.
4.TV diners originally couldn't be cooked in microwaves due to the metal tray.
6.The control panel is minor, the only real change is the power efficiency has really improved.
7.Automatic doors also used to swing open, as oppose to slide (my kids have never seen those)
10.Ultrasounds have gone 3-D.

Now bubble wrap is by far the greatest invention on the list.  It is easy to lose time, popping.  The other items I wouldn't want back in the 50's versions.
 
2013-07-14 12:27:46 AM
I've always been amazed what a large percentage of modern inventions come from the 1950s and 60s. Literally anything you think of as modern likely had its roots in those amazing two decades of innovation. And I doubt we'll ever see another era of such prolific ingenuity!

Try to think of something "modern" that WASN'T invented then; it's harder than you think...
 
2013-07-14 02:12:10 AM

ng2810: PacManDreaming: I can remember getting our first microwave in 1977. My aunt and uncle got one a few years before us and I always thought it was cool. Prior to that, you heated everything on the stove or in the oven. A lot of people, today, would be shocked if they had to do that.

I can also remember TV dinners being a rare treat. They took about 30 minutes to cook in the oven instead of a few minutes in the microwave, so they weren't really a major convenience. The best part was...we got to eat them on TV trays, on the couch, in front of the TV!

I'm actually considering getting rid of my microwave since I rarely use it. I use my toaster oven and hot plate to do most of my cooking since all my food is bought fresh anyways. Plus the huge box is taking up valuable counter space in my 200 sq ft space.


The Keurig is the only one we found worthy of counter space.

img.fark.net
 
2013-07-14 04:46:21 AM
Stupid for-clicks article.

Twelve innovations from the 1890s that are still in use today:

zipper
X-ray
cold cereal
aspirin
radio
movie camera
bolt-action rifle
subways
escalator
dry-cell battery
vacuum cleaner
automobile

Wow! Who'd have imagined major innovations might last into the future? It's like, magic or something.
 
2013-07-14 06:29:02 AM
lack of warmth:
7.Automatic doors also used to swing open, as oppose to slide (my kids have never seen those)

A major grocery store around here (Heinen's) has swinging automatic doors.
 
2013-07-14 07:22:22 AM

Kraftwerk Orange: [www.barcoding.com image 268x175]

[upload.wikimedia.org image 320x209]


Bar codes didn't actually hit store shelves until 1976, and one of the first places they were used was... vinyl LPs.
 
2013-07-14 10:36:24 AM
Pop? POP?! *shakefist*
 
2013-07-14 11:00:19 AM

100 Watt Walrus: Stupid for-clicks article.

Twelve innovations from the 1890s that are still in use today:

zipper
X-ray
cold cereal
aspirin
radio
movie camera
bolt-action rifle
subways
escalator
dry-cell battery
vacuum cleaner
automobile

Wow! Who'd have imagined major innovations might last into the future? It's like, magic or something.


That's the spirit! And to make it even worse, here are some that persist from 50,000 years ago...

-meat cooked on the barbie
-tailored clothing (as opposed to throwing a bear skin over your shoulders)
-needle and thread (for making and repairing clothing and moccasins)
-l & r fitted moccasins and even water-proof mukluks
-combs and other personal items (made from carefully carved and finished antler and bone)
-bows and arrows(?)
etcetera... :)
 
2013-07-14 11:01:14 AM

PacManDreaming: I can also remember TV dinners being a rare treat. They took about 30 minutes to cook in the oven instead of a few minutes in the microwave, so they weren't really a major convenience. The best part was...we got to eat them on TV trays, on the couch, in front of the TV!


This. It was a pretty big deal to have a TV dinner, and it usually happened when my mom wasn't feeling well and wasn't up to cooking dinner. My favorites were Swanson's lasagna and their turkey dinner, both with two veg sides and the dessert in the middle (you can still get the turkey dinner that way but not the lasagna). Neither of them would have been a common meal in my house anyway, so it was a double treat.

Also, seems to me that credit cards weren't really that much in use until maybe the late 70s/early 80s. In 1976, our family went on vacation to Busch Gardens in Williamsburg, VA, and since my parents (as usual) didn't make hotel reservations in advance, we had a helluva time finding a room... but I clearly remember that when my dad was making arrangements to pay, the hotel clerk was like, "Oooo, Visa!" when my dad took out his card. Then again, said clerk also said he was down from Michigan to work for the summer, so maybe he hadn't been out much before then...
 
2013-07-14 11:35:56 AM
The first general-purpose charge cards must have been a heck of a tough sell for the guy trying to get retailers to accept them.  Especially back in the day before everything was electronic.  Imagine trying to get a restaurant to accept your charge cards:

"You see, it's just as convenient as cash, except you have to fill out this form and mail it in to us, and we'll send you your money the following month.  You'll need to get a few card-impression machines and train your front-of-house staff to use them.  We'll only charge you 2% of the transaction amount for our serv- hey, wait, what's so funny?"
 
2013-07-14 12:28:50 PM

Lydia_C: My favorites were Swanson's lasagna and their turkey dinner, both with two veg sides and the dessert in the middle


It used to drive me crazy as a kid for any of the peas, carrots or other vegetables to get mixed in with my apple pie. I always had to pick them out, first thing. It's funny, I don't remember the entrees, but I remember the peas and carrots, tater tots and the apple pie.


This guy has some old TV dinner packaging posted on Flickr. Some of our other contacts have even more. Check them out if you're into that sort of thing.
 
2013-07-14 12:30:35 PM
Lydia_C:

Sorry, meant to post this page. There's a ton of retro TV dinner packaging there!
 
2013-07-14 03:34:54 PM

Stone Meadow: 100 Watt Walrus: Stupid for-clicks article.

Twelve innovations from the 1890s that are still in use today:

zipper
X-ray
cold cereal
aspirin
radio
movie camera
bolt-action rifle
subways
escalator
dry-cell battery
vacuum cleaner
automobile

Wow! Who'd have imagined major innovations might last into the future? It's like, magic or something.

That's the spirit! And to make it even worse, here are some that persist from 50,000 years ago...

-meat cooked on the barbie
-tailored clothing (as opposed to throwing a bear skin over your shoulders)
-needle and thread (for making and repairing clothing and moccasins)
-l & r fitted moccasins and even water-proof mukluks
-combs and other personal items (made from carefully carved and finished antler and bone)
-bows and arrows(?)
etcetera... :)


I was thinking about going there myself, but I was sleepy and didn't feel like doing the legwork to make sure of the timeframe for such things.

/the wheel
 
2013-07-14 04:26:32 PM

100 Watt Walrus: I was thinking about going there myself, but I was sleepy and didn't feel like doing the legwork to make sure of the timeframe for such things.

/the wheel


Not to worry...I didn't confirm the dates, either. That said, they're close enough to make the point that there are lots of persistent human inventions. Go far enough back and they are all elaborations of Maslow's basic needs: food, water, sleep and sex.
 
2013-07-14 05:32:32 PM

lordargent: If something works well enough, why would there be any surprise that it's still in use today?

// pencils are from the 1500s and you can still run down to your office supply store of choice and grab some.


And we still use what amounts to steam engines every day to generate all our electricity.
 
2013-07-14 08:51:58 PM

Vaneshi: lordargent: If something works well enough, why would there be any surprise that it's still in use today?

// pencils are from the 1500s and you can still run down to your office supply store of choice and grab some.

And we still use what amounts to steam engines every day to generate all our electricity.


Not completely all. Some small amount is by solar and wind and maybe hydro-electric generators.
 
2013-07-14 08:57:27 PM

lethological_lassie: American women were not using credit cards, at least their OWN credit cards, until after 1974.

They weren't allowed to be considered for credit cards!

http://msmagazine.com/blog/2013/05/28/10-things-that-american-women- co uld-not-do-before-the-1970s/


I remember back in the 1970s a woman could not even but anything on hire purchase (probably known as a purchase plan by Americans) without her husband's signature. If she was single her father's signature was good enough.

And as recently as the early 1980s job ads in The Sydney Morning Herald were in two sections: Men and Boys; Women and Girls.
 
2013-07-15 01:42:32 AM

Bravo Two: Remember: marketing is not about selling a product, it's about selling the fear of NOT HAVING your product.


Book marked.
 
2013-07-15 03:11:49 AM

8 inches: Bravo Two: Remember: marketing is not about selling a product, it's about selling the fear of NOT HAVING your product.

Book marked.


If you can find it theres a fascinating and disturbing documentary series called The Century of the Self about how the then new science of psychology was immediately twisted into the brand new field of public relations for propaganda and advertising.
 
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