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(Martha's Vineyard Times)   Man with no sailing experience buys 36 foot sailboat, heads out to sea, abandons ship in storm. Boat sails better without him and gently comes ashore on sandy beach 700 miles away   (mvtimes.com) divider line 51
    More: Strange, rescue boat, Falmouth, Edgartown, official residence, shipping lanes, boats, storms, Martha's Vineyard  
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6754 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jul 2013 at 3:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



51 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-13 11:45:23 AM
Finders keepers.
 
2013-07-13 12:49:14 PM
Well, it is said that the two happiest days of a boat owners life are the day they buy a boat and the day they sell it.  I bet he doesn't buy another boat.
 
2013-07-13 12:56:17 PM

camelclub: Finders keepers.


It's jetsom at that point.
 
2013-07-13 02:45:47 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-07-13 02:59:45 PM
LOL land lubber.
 
2013-07-13 03:33:35 PM
$$$ > brains
 
2013-07-13 04:01:51 PM
No FAIL tag?
 
2013-07-13 04:05:01 PM

I_Am_Weasel:


Baby steps
 
2013-07-13 04:08:32 PM
Protip: Never get into a life raft until you have to climb *up* into it. Most sailboats are surprisingly resilient.

/ also, that "two best days thing is crap, and annoying
 
2013-07-13 04:09:30 PM

Ronin_S: No FAIL tag?


www.attractionsmagazine.com

I'm failing awaaaaaaaay....
 
2013-07-13 04:09:31 PM

basemetal: Well, it is said that the two happiest days of a boat owners life are the day they buy a boat and the day they sell it.  I bet he doesn't buy another boat.


How do you make a small fortune?

Start with a big one and then buy a boat.
 
2013-07-13 04:12:37 PM
What a fateful trip.
 
das
2013-07-13 04:12:38 PM
TA DA!
 
2013-07-13 04:16:24 PM
He works for Goldman Sachs... amirite?
 
2013-07-13 04:20:15 PM

bearded clamorer: Ronin_S: No FAIL tag?

[www.attractionsmagazine.com image 250x257]

I'm failing awaaaaaaaay....


n2.9cloud.us
 
2013-07-13 04:28:33 PM
The jib had been shredded. The boom was broken. There was insufficient poop on the poop deck.
 
2013-07-13 04:33:08 PM
Say what you will, I like the cut of his jib. Well, ok, maybe not right now...
 
2013-07-13 04:47:28 PM

Bruxellensis: $$$ > brains


true dat.

This guy is an eejit.
 
2013-07-13 04:52:39 PM
20-foot waves must be fun in a 36-foot boat.
 
2013-07-13 04:56:36 PM

SFSailor: Protip: Never get into a life raft until you have to climb *up* into it. Most sailboats are surprisingly resilient.


home.roadrunner.com
 
GBB [TotalFark]
2013-07-13 05:15:25 PM

mainsail: Bruxellensis: $$$ > brains

true dat.

This guy is an eejit.


hmmm... i have my rv here and my boat is here, but i have to get both back down south... what to do??
there really is a thing as being "too smart", isn't there?  when you can't see the obvious answer because you are trying to concoct some elaborate scheme.
 
2013-07-13 05:30:28 PM

GBB: mainsail: Bruxellensis: $$$ > brains

true dat.

This guy is an eejit.

hmmm... i have my rv here and my boat is here, but i have to get both back down south... what to do??
there really is a thing as being "too smart", isn't there?  when you can't see the obvious answer because you are trying to concoct some elaborate scheme.


Well, first you take the duck in the boat and leave him on the other side. Then take the fox over, leave him there and bring the duck back. Load up the corn and leave the duck. Drop the corn off with the fox and go back for the duck. Simple!

About 550 miles off the East Coast, still about 400 miles from Bermuda, he ran into a fierce storm with waves topping 20 feet and steady winds of 40 knots, he said.

It's called the gulf stream- none of your fancy sailing books mentioned it?
I have a similar plan to this guy except for one minor difference- I've been planning my escape for years, learning the ropes on much smaller craft and thinking every step through. Sometimes being too poor to make snap decisions and buy a lifestyle is a good thing. You have to earn the sea. Go buy a house boat and move to lake Meade.
 
2013-07-13 05:37:49 PM
From the sound of it, how has he lived this long?  He's going to sail across the Atlantic to Europe and has never sailed before?  It's discouraging people this stupid can find a way to make all this money.
 
2013-07-13 05:43:28 PM
Hes almost 70, obsessive athlete. People like that wont admit to limits on their ability. Sounds like exactly the kind of guy you DONT want to be sitting next to at a dinner party.
 
2013-07-13 05:51:32 PM
Boat: n. A hole in the water into which one throws money.
 
2013-07-13 05:57:52 PM
Dear Mr. Heldenbrand,

You are a dildo.

Sincerely,
Devolving_Spud
 
2013-07-13 05:59:20 PM

basemetal: Well, it is said that the two happiest days of a boat owners life are the day they buy a boat and the day they sell it.  I bet he doesn't buy another boat.


I've owned boats most of my life, and my happiest days are ones spent on the water.
 
2013-07-13 06:05:12 PM
If it flies, floats, or farks... RENT IT!
 
2013-07-13 06:28:02 PM
20-foot waves must be fun in a 36-foot boat.

If you're in deep water and don't have an adverse current or confused seas, then larger waves are more gently sloped and the peaks are much father apart. With an able helmsman it's considerably more comfortable than 6ft waves in a 36ft sailboat.


If those waves cross a shoal, or a tidal current opposing them watch out. They'll rear up and slam you with a near vertical face. That's one of the reasons to head for deep water if you're caught out in a storm. It can be safer to ride out a storm at sea than to try and come in.

 
2013-07-13 06:42:20 PM
Ship of a fool.
 
2013-07-13 06:42:56 PM
Guys who wish to sail outside of the plastic swan pond should accept instruction. He was a menace to himself and others, and you don't leave an abandoned boat floating. You cut the hoses so that it doesn't run down a smaller boat in the middle of the night, or crash into a bird sanctuary ashore and dump its load of diesel, gas and other toxic things.

/stupid old man
//buy a rowboat and have a stroke.
 
2013-07-13 06:46:45 PM
A fool and his money are soon sailing more boat than they can handle, or something.

Here's a short video demonstrating the concept:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAyDS1NuK_A
 
2013-07-13 06:46:50 PM

spamalope: 20-foot waves must be fun in a 36-foot boat.If you're in deep water and don't have an adverse current or confused seas, then larger waves are more gently sloped and the peaks are much father apart. With an able helmsman it's considerably more comfortable than 6ft waves in a 36ft sailboat.
If those waves cross a shoal, or a tidal current opposing them watch out. They'll rear up and slam you with a near vertical face. That's one of the reasons to head for deep water if you're caught out in a storm. It can be safer to ride out a storm at sea than to try and come in.


Add to that the fact that a Pearson ketch, being an old and somewhat heavy boat...and a ketch...will heave to in all but survival seas, which these were not.

Heave to, keep a watch for shipping every 20 minutes, turn on the AIS, make some tea and wait it out.

http://on.aol.ca/video/when-to-heave-to---storm-tactics-228512629
 
2013-07-13 06:59:55 PM
I have a dream of finally buying a sail boat and spending some time in the Caribbean.  I also want to learn to sail and maybe get a smaller boat and getting years of experience before I do it.
 
2013-07-13 07:32:34 PM
I have never been on a sailboat or a tanker so I'm not sure if it is/was possible, but why didn't he/they attach the sailboat with a rope (or whatever) to the tanker that picked him up, instead of setting it adrift?
 
2013-07-13 07:56:58 PM
www.mvtimes.com

Why didn't he stow all sails and run "bare poles" in the storm?
 
2013-07-13 08:00:44 PM
He had no previous sailing experience when he bought the vessel in December 2012, but he had dreamed of life at sea. He spent the next five months outfitting Running Free for a trans-Atlantic voyage and learning how to handle the boat on his own.

What a farking idiot.  I mean he's so farking stupid it makes me mad.  I'm angry that somebody so farking stupid didn't manage to kill himself with that stunt.

I briefly dreamed about buying a boat and sailing around the world.  I could afford to do it if I bought an older boat.  It's not lack of money that kept me from doing it.  What kept me from doing it is not wanting to put in the years it would take to build up the knowledge and experience necessary to pull it off.  You don't just read a few books, jump in your boat and head out to sea.  You learn the basics of sailing on a little boat.  And crew with experienced sailors who are delivering boats for rich folks who don't have the time/skill to move their craft across the big stretches of open sea.  After a couple years of that, you buy your big boat and practice going up and down the coast.  Maybe (maybe!) by year three, you're ready to make that run to Bermuda.

A determined person might cut that down to a couple years but there's no trading book learning for hands-on experience.
 
2013-07-13 08:02:34 PM

Primitive Screwhead: basemetal: Well, it is said that the two happiest days of a boat owners life are the day they buy a boat and the day they sell it.  I bet he doesn't buy another boat.

How do you make a small fortune?

Start with a big one and then buy a boat.


Around here, the answer is, "Start a winery."  The judges would also accept "horses".  Anything at all to do with horses.
 
2013-07-13 08:26:59 PM

studebaker hoch: [www.mvtimes.com image 640x360]

Why didn't he stow all sails and run "bare poles" in the storm?


Or in this case "bare poles and full dodger"
 
2013-07-13 08:34:52 PM

archichris: Hes almost 70, obsessive athlete. People like that wont admit to limits on their ability. Sounds like exactly the kind of guy you DONT want to be sitting next to at a dinner party.


This this thisity this.
 
2013-07-13 08:52:07 PM
Good for him-

/sell the boat
 
2013-07-13 09:25:58 PM

bratface: I have never been on a sailboat or a tanker so I'm not sure if it is/was possible, but why didn't he/they attach the sailboat with a rope (or whatever) to the tanker that picked him up, instead of setting it adrift?


It MIGHT be possible, but if I were the tanker captain, I'd say "hell, no".   Odd are good that, underway, the sailboat would breach, capsize, etc, and wind up fouling the tanker's props as it sank/came apart.  At a minimum, you'd have to detail guys to watch it towing behind 24/7.   They already run with minimal crew to save money, so the added workload isn't negligible.

You'd also need a long enough, but light enough line to reach from the sailboat bow up to the tanker stern; any lines on the tanker will be WAY too heavy.  Sailboat's anchor line might do it, but in those sea conditions, you'd be doing well just to rig the damn thing in the first place.
 
2013-07-13 09:31:31 PM

bratface: I have never been on a sailboat or a tanker so I'm not sure if it is/was possible, but why didn't he/they attach the sailboat with a rope (or whatever) to the tanker that picked him up, instead of setting it adrift?


Decades ago, my dad was on an research vessel that came across a yacht in those same waters; three dentists aboard, yes, taking their first deep-sea run together, also to Bermuda.  (something about that island...)

Well, they'd been struck by lightning, which had fried their radios, their engine, and at least on of their wire stays. (things that hold the mast up...kind of important).  Fortunately, the rv had space on deck, and it was calm enough, they winched the entire sailboat on board, and took them along to port.

All three dentists donated to the Oceanographic for years after being rescued :)
 
2013-07-13 09:33:48 PM

Valiente: spamalope: 20-foot waves must be fun in a 36-foot boat.If you're in deep water and don't have an adverse current or confused seas, then larger waves are more gently sloped and the peaks are much father apart. With an able helmsman it's considerably more comfortable than 6ft waves in a 36ft sailboat.
If those waves cross a shoal, or a tidal current opposing them watch out. They'll rear up and slam you with a near vertical face. That's one of the reasons to head for deep water if you're caught out in a storm. It can be safer to ride out a storm at sea than to try and come in.

Add to that the fact that a Pearson ketch, being an old and somewhat heavy boat...and a ketch...will heave to in all but survival seas, which these were not.

Heave to, keep a watch for shipping every 20 minutes, turn on the AIS, make some tea and wait it out.

http://on.aol.ca/video/when-to-heave-to---storm-tactics-228512629


Ten bucks says he didn't have AIS.

Of course, I've been on bigger boats that didn't have backup GPS, so...

/ffs, spend $50 to back up your million-dollar investment
//single point of failure ftl
 
2013-07-13 10:35:05 PM

PunGent: bratface: I have never been on a sailboat or a tanker so I'm not sure if it is/was possible, but why didn't he/they attach the sailboat with a rope (or whatever) to the tanker that picked him up, instead of setting it adrift?

It MIGHT be possible, but if I were the tanker captain, I'd say "hell, no".   Odd are good that, underway, the sailboat would breach, capsize, etc, and wind up fouling the tanker's props as it sank/came apart.  At a minimum, you'd have to detail guys to watch it towing behind 24/7.   They already run with minimal crew to save money, so the added workload isn't negligible.

You'd also need a long enough, but light enough line to reach from the sailboat bow up to the tanker stern; any lines on the tanker will be WAY too heavy.  Sailboat's anchor line might do it, but in those sea conditions, you'd be doing well just to rig the damn thing in the first place.


Yep. The typical tanker stern has no gangways below the main deck, so there's a height difference akin to a 3-5 story building. Getting a line that can handle that, that's problem #1.  A tanker will be moving at 12-15 knots,  which is fast for a sailboat on flat water, let alone one that has to traverse waves. Problem #2.  And with the differences in mass, a small nudge in the tanker translates to a ridiculous shock force on the sailboat. Chances are the cleats would rip straight out. Problem #3  - that this not very experienced sailor can think off.
 
2013-07-13 10:39:33 PM

Valiente: Add to that the fact that a Pearson ketch, being an old and somewhat heavy boat...and a ketch...will heave to in all but survival seas, which these were not.


Exactly! It's amazing how much heaving to calms the motion of the boat. Reef the main, half furl the jib and for bonus points rig a line from the boom to the lazy jib sheet block as a preventer if she's not rigged for one. Hmm, is a ketch stable if you heave to with the jib fully furled and only the main and mizzen up? He might have been unable to reef the main if he waited too long.

Sound heavy cruisers are not easy to sink, and Pearsons have a great reputation. Even capsized they'll right themselves unaided. If you haven't cracked the keel loose or separated the deck from the hull, they'll be floating after the storm. The advice to stay aboard unless she sinks out from under you is absolutely correct. Men have died trying to leave a sound sailboat for rescue by a freighter (sailboat still floating after the storm of course...).
 
2013-07-13 10:41:10 PM

jtown: Primitive Screwhead: basemetal: Well, it is said that the two happiest days of a boat owners life are the day they buy a boat and the day they sell it.  I bet he doesn't buy another boat.

How do you make a small fortune?

Start with a big one and then buy a boat.

Around here, the answer is, "Start a winery."  The judges would also accept "horses".  Anything at all to do with horses.


I would go with supercars and whores, myself.
 
2013-07-14 12:24:37 AM
spamalope

Exactly! It's amazing how much heaving to calms the motion of the boat. Reef the main, half furl the jib and for bonus points rig a line from the boom to the lazy jib sheet block as a preventer if she's not rigged for one. Hmm, is a ketch stable if you heave to with the jib fully furled and only the main and mizzen up? He might have been unable to reef the main if he waited too long.

Marry me.
 
2013-07-14 12:34:52 AM
Was it, perchance, the Mr. Beaumont...?
 
2013-07-14 05:00:10 AM

spamalope: Valiente: Add to that the fact that a Pearson ketch, being an old and somewhat heavy boat...and a ketch...will heave to in all but survival seas, which these were not.

Exactly! It's amazing how much heaving to calms the motion of the boat. Reef the main, half furl the jib and for bonus points rig a line from the boom to the lazy jib sheet block as a preventer if she's not rigged for one. Hmm, is a ketch stable if you heave to with the jib fully furled and only the main and mizzen up? He might have been unable to reef the main if he waited too long.

Sound heavy cruisers are not easy to sink, and Pearsons have a great reputation. Even capsized they'll right themselves unaided. If you haven't cracked the keel loose or separated the deck from the hull, they'll be floating after the storm. The advice to stay aboard unless she sinks out from under you is absolutely correct. Men have died trying to leave a sound sailboat for rescue by a freighter (sailboat still floating after the storm of course...).


You know I could make up words too if it weren't so damn late/early.
 
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