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(BBC-US)   Gen Xers ... the forgotten generation at work   (bbc.com) divider line 99
    More: Interesting, Gen Xers, Generation X, Pew Charitable Trusts, University of Guelph, middle management, acquiescence, latchkey kid, disaffection  
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17918 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jul 2013 at 5:08 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2013-07-12 06:41:54 AM
8 votes:
I think the article was pretty accurate, especially in the portrayal of Gen X'ers.  At my last job, I was always caught between my two bosses (who were both Boomers, but on the young side of Boomers).  One boss, was convinced that I did nothing whereas the other boss fought him tooth and nail to keep me through all the rounds of layoffs as the economy bombed.  Even though I had designed every spreadsheet, form, data table, built an accredited lab, wrote the lab technician training manual, was the de facto IT person and scheduled all the technicians for field work it never felt like what I did was adequate or enough for the one boss.  I eventually just gave up trying to please him and did my job to the best of my ability.

Something I think that perplexes the Boomers about Gen X'ers is our refusal to put work over our families.  I think this stems from the fact that many of us grew up either in houses where the parents were not there (latchkey) or were divorced.  There's a reason divorce is at a 40 year low and it's Gen X http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303544604576430341393583 056.html.  We've placed our families above everything.  I would rather make less money and be able to attend my kid's games and coach they're teams then work OT every day so I can afford a mid-life crisis.  The one thing I decided when I got married is that my kids would never go through what I went through and they haven't to this point and hopefully they never will.
2013-07-12 12:20:14 AM
7 votes:
These threads are almost as predictable as bicycle threads.

Boomer: Those gen X whiners just need to work harder.
Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire?
Millennial: We can't even GET jobs!
Boomer: Check back with me when you work as hard as WE did.
Everyone: Whatever, Gramps.

Someone posts a picture of the "Worked a summer job/bought a new car" "Quit a job/got a new one" shoops.

Yay.
2013-07-12 05:47:26 AM
6 votes:
I work at a factory and the problem isn't boomers, lots of them are great workers, the problem is the ones who could retire but can't because they buried themselves in debt. As a result they stay into their 70s but no longer give two shiats about their jobs. Nothing is more annoying than fixing mistakes for someone who makes more than you and who confuses seniority with superiority.
2013-07-12 07:53:14 AM
5 votes:
Oh boy!
 This is the thread where every Gen Xer who dares to complain about getting handed a ration of shiat will be upbraided one one side as not bootstrappy enough by the FYIGM boomers still fellating Reagan's corpse, while hearing the dulcet cries of I EXPECT RESPECT!!! from the millennials on the others.
Fun times, fun times!
2013-07-12 05:51:54 AM
5 votes:
I can see how the generation thing has screwed with my generation (X).
Most of the people who were my bosses when I started working had been promoted to management in their mid 30s. By the time I got there they were in their late 40s. And they are still there now, in their 60s, with no real desire to retire. Hell some of them are living off their superannuation already, salary sacrificing 100% of their wage to avoid tax and laughing as they screw the economy even more.
I have been lucky enough (and 'agile' enough - yay buzzwords) to get up alongside them on the ol' corporate ladder. But plenty of the gen X folk I see, seem stuck below the boomer logjam, not through lack of skill, ambition, education, ability or knowledge but just because there are only so many people you can promote to middle management and you can't make upper management without working your way up (or having daddy own the company).
2013-07-12 05:44:31 AM
5 votes:
The boomers decided nobody could ever suffer like them so they engineered a world of hurt for their descendents. Gen X was the testbed for pretty mech every failed education policy, work scheme and housing policy and we bore the brunt of them. We have lived in a world of constant change and disruption. We were spawned in a recession and now we are back in familiar ground.

You are all farked.

We have come home.
2013-07-12 11:51:12 AM
4 votes:
I'm GenX. People say we're apathetic but I don't really care.

My not-so-CSB: I watched my father work for a big company that was loyal to him, fostered his growth and development so he could be a greater asset to the corporation, paid a nice pension and extended benefits to his wife when he died. He was loyal to the company and the company was loyal to him. He's part of what I guess you'd call the Greatest Generation.

My baby-boomer sister saw this and got her degree and went to work for the same company. After about 15-20 years they pulled everyone's pension to pay for some CEO's golden parachute, and had the nerve to act surprised when everyone quit, giving them the finger when they left.

I saw what happened to my sister, and it only took one company doing that to me that I realized the only company I need to work for is Torchsong, Inc. (and its subsidiary, Mrs. Torchsong). To be honest, I'm surprised/ashamed I had to have one company do it to me before I realized it. 

I'm GenX, and I've been gainfully employed since leaving college, but make no mistake, my employer. You will get my best work while I'm here*, but I am not loyal to you, your mission statement, or furthering your goals, because deep down I know you feel the same way about me. As long as we both understand and accept this, I think we'll get along great.

*Yes, savor the irony I'm typing this on the job (Hey, we do get breaks, y'know! :) )
2013-07-12 08:06:13 AM
4 votes:
Speaking of generational conflict. . .

Boomers, in the 60's they were saying to never trust anybody over 30, who went to Woodstock, who got high as a kite on MJ, who were the hippies and flower children who weren't trusted by the "Greatest Generation" who thought that everything was falling apart because the kids these days didn't want to work and just wanted to listen to Rock & Roll music and party and avoid responsibility. . .are now acting just like their parents did way-back-when and acting like they were always super-hard working industrious people who never took the time to enjoy their youth and see the young of today as shiftless and lazy.
2013-07-12 07:58:32 AM
4 votes:

ordinarysteve: I work at a factory and the problem isn't boomers, lots of them are great workers, the problem is the ones who could retire but can't because they buried themselves in debt. As a result they stay into their 70s but no longer give two shiats about their jobs. Nothing is more annoying than fixing mistakes for someone who makes more than you and who confuses seniority with superiority.


That's why I just laugh when the unemployment numbers come out every month and handwringing goes on about "OMGZ, millions of people are leaving the workforce and have given up!!"   Good.   Most of them are Boomers who should be retiring anyway to clear out room the top for the next generation.    Most of them     keep working only because they've got to pay for an unsustainable level of consumption (and boy, Babyboomers love them some consumption.   The generation that brought us  an obesity epidemic, McMansion Housing Developments and 13 mph SUVs.   The only generation who when faced with an attack on American soil said "Fark it.  Let's cut taxes across the board, head to the malls and buy some shiat.  That's how we deal with crisis.   God Bless America).     In the end the goal in life shouldn't be to work until the day you drop dead, and maybe being forced into retirement will cause you to re-evaluate whether you really need 3 automobiles and a $175 a month cable/satellite bill.
2013-07-12 07:52:37 AM
4 votes:

Ishkur: Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.


Yeah, my parents were both born in the early '50's, and are quintessential boomers.  Right down to my grandfather being a WWII veteran who came home from the war to start a family and my father having this bizarre kismet of getting a high five-figure job despite having no college education, and my mother sincerely telling me when I went off to college in '96 that right after graduation I could get an "office job" by just having "any college degree" and walking into the office of "any firm downtown" and telling me student loan debt didn't matter because I would be able to pay it all off in just a few years after graduation because I'll be a college graduate.

Then again, my mother was HEAVILY pressuring me to go to law school, she believed that having a J.D. and passing the bar basically instantly meant you were going to be wealthy and affluent since lawyers make so much money.  I almost went down that road until some lawyers my family knew warned me that it is NOT like that anymore, and while I had the potential to be a pretty good attorney, the career field for them was positively swamped.

When for years the only work I could find was retail, warehouse and call center work, she'd just assume I was being lazy since I wasn't making $50k/year by my mid 20's like my father was at my age, and I have a degree and he didn't.  My mother assumed I was wanting to fail, since I didn't go to law school like she'd been telling me I would since grade school.

Seriously, my mother was a prototype helicopter parent.  Ever since I was in grade school, my mother was telling me how my life would go: I would be a Congressional Page in high school, go to an Ivy League college, I would go to law school, I would be a JAG Officer in the military (Reserve or Guard only), I would marry into a major political family (she was a huge fan of the Kennedys, her biggest dream was for me to somehow marry into that family, but she'd "settle" for any political family she'd ever heard of), and I'd run for Congress around the time I was 30.  I had that future-biography recited to me from almost the time I entered school.  *sigh*
2013-07-12 07:47:35 AM
4 votes:
I'm from the tail end of the Boomers, and work with a woman who just turned 70.  She is drawing SS, has an inheritance she just came into, and draws 2 salaries here (1 parttime,1 fulltime).  She is always talking about retiring and her debt load at the same time.  She gets all uppity when any of the rest of us actually stick to our work schedule, because she is available at any moment to run by the office.  Make my position full time, pay me enough to have dependable utilities and food, and then maybe I won't be watching the clock.  Because if I miss that 2:57 bus, I'm late to my evening job, you old biddy.
2013-07-12 07:25:48 AM
4 votes:
Born in '71 myself.. careers, promotions, aren't those urban legends?
2013-07-12 07:03:32 AM
4 votes:

largedon: Actually most X'ers I know hardly watch TV at all.


Television is a quintessential Boomer thing. They grew up with television, they evolved with it, they watched it advance and grow from the first grainy black & white shows in the 40s on three channels to today's HD broadcasts on several hundred. Boomers are inextricably linked with the social dominance of television -- they are the first generation to literally watch the whole world pass them by, from the Kennedy assassination to the moonlanding, Watergate, the Berlin Wall, the Gulf War and 9/11. They also remember with equal amounts of fondness Ricky Ricardo, Ginger vs Mary Ann, Kirk & Spock, Carol Burnett's tarzan yell, the last episode of MASH and who shot JR. Their parents had radio and their children have the internet, but television is theirs. They were born in the age of television and they will die in front of the television, slumped in their sofas, their remotes still in their hands.

/for Xers, it is video games.
2013-07-12 06:46:41 AM
4 votes:

Farkbert: 2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.
3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.


Uhm... Where I live you wouldn't be offered a job because obviously you are not reliable and would leave in a few months anyway.
There is a double standard where as an employee you are expected to be loyal to your company even though the company doesn't give a shiat about you, but to be honest I wouldn't hire you either.
2013-07-12 06:29:35 AM
4 votes:

The Southern Dandy: They always told us growing up, that watching TV would turn our brains to mush.  Gen-Xers are the proof.  Those brain-washed, cable news watching idiots have farked up this country to the point where I'm not sure it can ever recover.  No, scratch that. I sure it won't ever recover.


Baby boomers. You meant them, right?
2013-07-12 02:39:36 AM
4 votes:
In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.
2013-07-12 01:54:40 AM
4 votes:
I have a decent job with the government. In fact, within my specialty (which, sadly, is not described as "drinking whiskey", in which case I'd be a millionaire at least) I'm one of the top people at my high-profile federal agency. You probably see the name of my agency in the news at least several times a year if you live in the US. But the jobs are vanishing, quickly. We have few if any Gen-Xers in our group. It's all people under 33 or so (I'm 29 myself) and people over 50. Huge gap in the middle. The old people aren't retiring, and with all the sequestration, even when they do, good luck seeing those jobs re-posted.

And people complain they can't get competent government employees, while also typically having terrible misconceptions of the benefits of being a federal employee. Example: to get the nice cushy federal pension everyone thinks we get, you would have had to have been hired around 1984. It's different now, and mostly depends on a 401k. F*ck that. I have my own Roth IRA I max every year.
2013-07-12 09:15:37 AM
3 votes:

meanmutton: Cubansaltyballs: In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.

Speaking as a 35-year-old -- don't pretend that we're any less incompetent.

Also, when they were 35, it's not like they weren't in the same positions you are in right now.


When the Boomers were 35, they had little to no student debt, and had likely spent over a decade working for the same company that paid enough so that one breadwinner could raise a nice middle class family out in the suburbs. The generation before them handed them everything, but it was the Boomers who pulled up the ladder behind them.
2013-07-12 08:36:16 AM
3 votes:
I'm a really late Boomer - I missed out on the Summer of Love but have to endure all the crap from my older brothers and sisters, like how they all went from being Yippies to being Yuppies. What I dislike about my own generation is the astounding hypocrisy. The guy who went to law school to represent injured workers? Yeah, he's now working for the insurance companies helping them screw injured workers out of their payouts. The friend who went to medical school and promised to devote 50% of his time to inner-city clinics? Now working for Kaiser and living in a gated community.

Not all of my friends sold out, but I've noticed one thing: the ones who got a little money, suddenly wanted ALL the money. There seems to be no middle ground among my circle of friends. You're either still working at a job you feel contributes to the overall "good" of society (teacher, nurse, etc) and watching your buying power erode and your career stall, or you're feeding at the trough and joining the country club.

I can understand the Gen X folks and the Millennial kids. They were smart enough to realize that the era of companies actually taking care of their workers is long gone. They see no reason to be "loyal" to a company whose upper management will sell them down the river faster than a New York minute.
2013-07-12 07:39:43 AM
3 votes:

Doc Daneeka: Definitions of Gen X that I see generally extend it to birth dates in the early 80s. Then again, the Millennial gen is generally defined as starting in the early 80s. As a 1981 baby, this is the source of my confusion.

I'm often considered too young to really be part of Gen X. But I don't identify with the Millennial generation either. I think of Millennials as people either in college now or recent grads. I've been out of college a decade now.



Do you have any siblings? ...how old are they? ....how old were your parents when they had you? Were they Boomers?

One of the more common misconceptions about Xers is that they were the children of the Boomers. This is wrong -- well, some might be children of Boomer teenage pregnancies or early adults, but this wasn't common; the vast majority of Boomers held off having children until their 30s. Some Xers are younger siblings of Boomers, but most are actually late children of "war babies" (people born from 1939-1945).

Xers were not as large or as numerous as the Boomers so they could not affect society with their social inertia like the Boomers could. They could never lead trends, they could only follow them. They were often forgotten and left out in the cold, too small to be attractive to market forces or amass great social change. They were the first generation of the dual income family ethic. They were the latchkey kids forced to raise themselves because both parents always worked. Factor these altogether: Forgotten by the world because they don't matter, forgotten by the industry of society because they're a market minority, forgotten at home because no one's ever around..... and you have the surly, brooding angst canonized in grunge music, John Hughes movies and mcjobs. This crippling worldview germinates apathy and disillusionment. No identity, no purpose, no future, no label. They are X.

The Millenials are generally considered to be born between 82-99 with a peak year of 1990. They are the TRUE children of the Boomers. They are a much larger, much fatter demographic than the Xers, so their affect on social change is a lot more evocative. But they are not as large or as numerous as the Boomers. The problem with large population groups is they tend to be more full of themselves (because they have a ready supply of unconditional peer-affirmation)
2013-07-12 05:45:51 AM
3 votes:
As the only GenXer at my last job, I agree with the article. I came to work, shut up and did my job. Management was in their 50's and 60's and the 25 year olds I worked with got all the credit. I miss the paycheck but I don't miss the job.
2013-07-12 05:11:31 AM
3 votes:
Gen Xers are the backbone of today's workforce. We don't complain, we just do our farking jobs and we do it well.

Our age makes us the primary group making up management, and our experience makes us valuable employees.

Other age groups have their pros and cons, but right now Gen Xers are the most important group in the workforce.
2013-07-12 12:29:07 AM
3 votes:

unlikely: Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire

die?


Bring on the death panels!

/kidding
//sorta
2013-07-12 01:58:58 PM
2 votes:
I'm now 13 years into my career, after graduating, as a programmer, into the .com bust. Through those 13 years, I've been given a single promotion, and I'm pretty sure that was a carrot to try to keep me from quitting... didn't work.

That said, I've still gotten ahead by getting those promotions by jumping companies instead. I don't, for a second, understand gen-X folks and younger that stay at a company for 5 to 10 years at a time. Loyalty is for suckers - the bosses I've had that seemed like the nicest guys in the world, everyone's best friend, have always turned into a repulsive jerk the moment I'd turn in my notice. Real Jekyll & Hyde shiat. Don't be fooled for a second that your best-buddy boss won't get rid of you to save himself.
2013-07-12 10:30:07 AM
2 votes:

steerforth: Darke: steerforth: Darke: Phinn: snowshovel: Anyway....I'd probably give the millenials the internet (which I can argue that Generation X may get)...but the millenials more importantly get: always on social connections.

Late Boomers built personal computers and the web software itself, Gen-X built the post-web Internet and blogging, but the Millenials have built the latest round of social media and a lot of apps.

What's the deal with the Gen-Y/Millenial constant social media thing, anyway?  Before the web, Gen-Xers (like me) were the kind of people to keep a Post Office box instead of getting mail at home.  (It helps keep Sallie Mae off our backs.)  The last thing we'd do is put our entire lives online.

I just want to say that Gen Y is NOT the same as Millenials.  Unlike the younguns, I CAN hold a face-to-face conversation, ignore facebook, and hold a steady job.

/apparently I'm invisible to whomever writes these stupid articles.

Yes they are. Some retard working in advertising just decided to change the name.

>.< goddammitsomuch.  I should probably actually wiki it before i type.  I stand corrected.

/doesn't mean I have to like it.  I might be technically a millennial (85), but I have nothing in common with them.

No one on the planet wants to be characterised by their supposed "generation", and fair enough. It is useful for demographers, as Ishkur has eloquently pointed out, but apart from that it means fark all except as an excuse to biatch about others and as a tool for marketers.

Then again, I rang my mother the other day to say happy 64th birthday, and she not only joked about the Beatles song but told me she and her partner had been over to see a similarly aged couple that afternoon, and were subsequently joined by another couple. Apparently they all sat around discussing whether an Australian, British, New Zealand or Canadian pension was more lucrative and which to apply for, all the while smoking doobies, the raw ingredients of which one coupl ...


meanwhile they pushed D.A.R.E. down your throat as you were growing up?
2013-07-12 10:19:15 AM
2 votes:

verbaltoxin: All the cultural touchstones marked with Gen. X and the millenials are the same thing, because the boomers were around during all of it. They didn't disappear for 30 years while Kurt Cobain and the internet happened. They watched all that sh*t go down too.


Fair enough, but a person's age at the time said sh*t goes down is still important. GenXers & Millenials were young when personal computers/the internet/social networking took shape, and are more comfortable using them. I know a few Baby Boomers who also have good computer/tech skills, but the majority are still asking me how to copy/paste/print from Excel.

I used to laugh at this...until I decided to go back to school recently. At age 42, I'm suddenly realizing my mind is not so much a sponge as a sieve now. :~( It sucks, and learning new skills takes a lot more effort. I'm committed to do it, but am beginning to see how older people - when faced with learning something new - could easily say 'f*ck it' out of laziness.

We should accept that the most likely cause of all this sh*t is powerful people sucking up all the resources, and pissing on the middle class and poor, while we are told to fight over the scraps.

Ultimately, you're right. What's happening now is not necessarily Baby Boomers vs. Everyone Else: it's the usual Haves vs. Have-Nots. Plenty of Baby Boomers (like my parents) are getting just as screwed as the rest of us.
2013-07-12 10:16:21 AM
2 votes:
number 1,  all the members of congress are boomers, and they were voted in by boomers.  boomers you have FAILED, yes I said it, you are a giant group of selfish failures (may God have mercy on your souls)

number 2,  the x'rs are morons for just accepting whatever the media throws at them, and voting obama in.

number 3,   I believe that the boomers have failed humanity as a whole.  And I know this because they are vastly responsible in allowing the federal government to become way way way overpowered.


most importantly:          If the boomers had any balls or brains, they would of protected their children instead of burdening them.
2013-07-12 09:08:58 AM
2 votes:

WhippingBoy: Franko: HO-LEE-CRAP, I'm not alone.

13 years of programming skills: only $45k jobs out there
project management certification: everyone wants at least 10 yrs experience.

I'm seriously on the verge of dropping everything and just cleaning houses for a living.

No one makes big bucks because they have "programming skills". My eight year old son has "programming skills". You want to get ahead at work? Whenever some issue, problem, or otherwise unpleasant situation comes up, just say "I'll do it!"

Observe:

Boss: "We need someone to fly to Korea tomorrow (Dec 23) and debug a problem one of our customers is having"
You: "I'll do it!"

Boss: "The developer who wrote this application just quit, and we need someone to take responsibility for his garbled spaghetti code"
You: "I'll do it!"

Boss: "Someone clogged the office toilet with a toxic dump and it needs to be unclogged"
You: "I'll do it!"

That's it. That's all you need to do.


Boss: "We need someone to fire because I want to hire a crony and we don't have the budget for another person. I know, that suck-up who cleaned the toilet. Fire his ass."

/seen it several times in my working life
2013-07-12 09:01:34 AM
2 votes:

CarnySaur: They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.


You laugh, but Gen Xers grew up on punk rock and hip hop, back when both were counter-cultural movements centered around rejection of authority. Now it seems like authority has all the resources and we're frozen out. We're all tatted up, loud and intentionally irresponsible, and the mellenials have learned from our mistakes. Their culture is subtly subversive, with humor as the primary means of self-expression. Mellenials have been conditioned to consume information, process it and conform just enough to get paid, while quietly sneering at the whole silly routine. They're on the inside, laughing at everyone. We're on the outside, still trying to bring it all down.

Xers make the disruptive start-ups that employ Mellenials. Boomers are in charge of the large corporate institutions that reject Xers out of spite. Interesting times.
2013-07-12 08:50:28 AM
2 votes:

Silverstaff: Speaking of generational conflict. . .

Boomers, in the 60's they were saying to never trust anybody over 30, who went to Woodstock, who got high as a kite on MJ, who were the hippies and flower children who weren't trusted by the "Greatest Generation" who thought that everything was falling apart because the kids these days didn't want to work and just wanted to listen to Rock & Roll music and party and avoid responsibility. . .are now acting just like their parents did way-back-when and acting like they were always super-hard working industrious people who never took the time to enjoy their youth and see the young of today as shiftless and lazy.



When I was in high school and college in the late 80s/mid-90s, all I ever heard from my elders was that GenX are a bunch of shiftless losers with no work ethic and questionable values. Well, now we're in our 30s or 40s and, frankly, I don't see any evidence that we're any lazier than any other generation. More snarky or sarcastic, maybe, but not lazy.

There was never anything wrong with being cynical about the age we grew up in. The Boomers had seemingly unbridled prosperity that started to lose steam right about the time many of the Xers were growing up and learning about how the world works. Especially late-Gen Xers. Being disillusioned or having to move back home after college (temporarily) wasn't something we wanted. It's just how it was for many of us. Just as it is now with GenY, Millennials, or whatever people are being called these days. But hell, these whippersnappers have it even worse than we did unless you're in one of the dwindling fields where demand outstrips supply.
2013-07-12 08:20:30 AM
2 votes:
Boomers are why we can't have nice things.

That is all.
2013-07-12 08:20:19 AM
2 votes:

Silverstaff: Ishkur: Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.

Yeah, my parents were both born in the early '50's, and are quintessential boomers.  Right down to my grandfather being a WWII veteran who came home from the war to start a family and my father having this bizarre kismet of getting a high five-figure job despite having no college education, and my mother sincerely telling me when I went off to college in '96 that right after graduation I could get an "office job" by just having "any college degree" and walking into the office of "any firm downtown" and telling me student loan debt didn't matter because I would be able to pay it all off in just a few years after graduation because I'll be a college graduate.

Then again, my mother was HEAVILY pressuring me to go to law school, she believed that having a J.D. and passing the bar basically instantly meant you were going to be wealthy and affluent since lawyers make so much money.  I almost went down ...


Your mom needed a job.
2013-07-12 07:00:39 AM
2 votes:
These "generation" distinctions are a little artificial.

I was born in 1978.  A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X.  The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

The thing is, I have little in common with Gen X.  I never knew who Kurt Cobain was at the time, and for quite a while when other kids were talking about Nirvana in school I thought Buddhism was a fad.  I never listened to grunge music, and I was sheltered enough from a lot of pop culture as a kid I didn't have many of the same cultural touchstones of Gen X (aside from watching the fall of communism, the destruction of Challenger, the Gulf War, ect).

On the other hand, whenever I read about Millennials, I read it and think "that's me".  Grew up around the rise of the PC and the internet, had a devil of a time even finding a job when I went into the workforce, part of a generation which was told from childhood that a college education is self-justifying and to just go and you'll be able to pay for those student loans later. . .

. . .but authors and demographers and such keep wanting to call me a Generation X'er because I was born in '78,
2013-07-12 05:36:53 AM
2 votes:
I like reading articles about sociology, demographics and the "generations", and most of them almost always get a whole bunch of things wrong.

But this article was surprisingly accurate and on the mark with regards to how the Boomers, Xers and Millenials see themselves and each other.
2013-07-12 05:36:48 AM
2 votes:
i.imgur.com


/Any day now
2013-07-12 01:47:22 PM
1 votes:
I suppose that that I am a Millenial, I was born in 86.

The more I think about my office experiences with the older crowds, the more I've felt that the X'ers were far less friendly/ socialable, but knew what to do in most every situation, and direct accordingly. The boomers are all incredibly nice but hold about as much usefulness as breast-plate nipples, but thye happen to be in charge.

Most of the 65+ year olds still working seem like they're just chasing the dragon man, and they aint ever gonna catch it. And the more I hang out in the office environment, the more I resent them and the just awful descisions/ "pulling up the ladder" that they commit. Very nasty business, really. But this is Fark, and we're all just shaking tiny, digital fists.

Now, the gen thats coming up, the one after millenials, (what are they called?), *ooooph* Thats gonna be rough. Trophies for handing in your work on time!
2013-07-12 12:59:10 PM
1 votes:

jayphat: The Irresponsible Captain: dready zim: The boomers decided nobody could ever suffer like them so they engineered a world of hurt for their descendents. Gen X was the testbed for pretty mech every failed education policy, work scheme and housing policy and we bore the brunt of them. We have lived in a world of constant change and disruption. We were spawned in a recession and now we are back in familiar ground.

You are all farked.

We have come home.

I like that!

Gen X, as viewed by everybody:
[www.newgeography.com image 453x344]

In case you missed it, Gen X is the gap that's been ignored.

We're going to have to suffer Boomers in the workplace a long time, if they ever retire.

[www.census.gov image 585x438]

Fark man. Apparently being born in 1981 qualifies me with the shiatheads of the Millenial Generation.  And that sickens me. My grandfather instilled values in me of "if you work hard, you reap that reward. But cautiously watch the work." Meaning, don't blindly work hard, work towards a goal and make sure you communicate with the people above you to make that goal known.

I currently work as a retail manager. And store manager is my first and foremost job. But I'm actively pursuing other work within the company in my excess time. And it's paying off in boatloads as my development is being accelerated by two other managers above me who are jockeying for which path of advancement for me to go down.

Comparatively to my colleagues of the same generation, I have to agree with some peoples sentiments that they need a cookie for putting on the right color pants for work. I just have to SMH at the lack of enthusiasm these people have and they're distinct lack of drive. Maybe it's just the way I was raised, I dunno.


Why work hard for a job that doesn't matter(retail)?

Seriously, the company views you as a number, you can be cut easily, you receive all the customer abuse, your tasks are menial and boring, and excelling does jack shiat for you or the company.

Not to mention the pay is insultingly low.
2013-07-12 11:44:08 AM
1 votes:
Graffito: I work for a small software company in northeast Ohio.  Management here makes lots of mistakes as do we all.  What surprises me is people in this thread who discount the cost to the employer of employee mistakes.  I am generally grateful for the opportunity to take on more complex assignments.  I know that if we don't at least break even it could mean layoffs so while I'm thrashing around trying to figure out how to make something work the last thing on my mind is how much I am getting paid.   If we make a profit, I'll be remembered at bonus time.

Yeah, I remember those days fondly.  I work for big corporate America.  There are so many layers of management with overlapping responsibility that nobody can figure out who's really in charge of what.  When things go wrong, there isn't any clear direction where to correctly lay blame.  Likewise, if you take on a next to impossible task and perform brilliantly, no one will notice, or worse, someone else will get the credit.  As just another cog in the wheel, I have very little control over whether the division meets or does not meet its numbers.  I can be laid off tomorrow over something I know nothing about because somebody 3000 miles away screwed something up.  Similarly, we might get donuts or a similar atta-boy because of a major win I had nothing to do with.  They used to give us bonuses back in the day but eventually figured out there's really no need to do that.
2013-07-12 11:27:19 AM
1 votes:

lack of warmth: Private_Citizen: WhippingBoy: Franko: HO-LEE-CRAP, I'm not alone.

13 years of programming skills: only $45k jobs out there
project management certification: everyone wants at least 10 yrs experience.

I'm seriously on the verge of dropping everything and just cleaning houses for a living.

No one makes big bucks because they have "programming skills". My eight year old son has "programming skills". You want to get ahead at work? Whenever some issue, problem, or otherwise unpleasant situation comes up, just say "I'll do it!"

Observe:

Boss: "We need someone to fly to Korea tomorrow (Dec 23) and debug a problem one of our customers is having"
You: "I'll do it!"

Boss: "The developer who wrote this application just quit, and we need someone to take responsibility for his garbled spaghetti code"
You: "I'll do it!"

Boss: "Someone clogged the office toilet with a toxic dump and it needs to be unclogged"
You: "I'll do it!"

That's it. That's all you need to do.

See in a meritocracy, that would work. In the real world, your boss ignores you and takes credit for your hard work. When he finally retires, the big bosses hire from the outside, since for years all your boss has said about you is how lazy you are and how he's always having to clean up your messes.

This.
And when the big boss hires the replacement boss, he hires the young up and coming who starts out near your pay so he doesn't have to give you a raise.  Which means for the next few years, you have to train him to catch up.  Behind your back he rattles on about your 'bad attitude' and looks to fire you in spite of your 'bank of knowledge'.

Did I miss anything?


Nope. Unlike spectroboy, who completely missed the point, you definitely hit the target.
2013-07-12 11:24:59 AM
1 votes:

SpectroBoy: Private_Citizen: See in a meritocracy, that would work. In the real world, your boss ignores you and takes credit for your hard work. When he finally retires, the big bosses hire from the outside, since for years all your boss has said about you is how lazy you are and how he's always having to clean up your messes.

So are you saying your boss purposely went out of his way to hurt the most cooperative and helpful employee or that he did that to all his reports?

If the former, he is an exception. Most bosses know to keep their most helpful people around even if they plan on stealing the credit.

If the latter, no harm. Your peers are no better off.

/ Sounds more like you have crafted an excuse not to work too hard to me.


I've seen it time and again. Being the "go to guy" will not get you promoted in todays world. Shameless self promotion on the otherhand....

/let me tell you about the dozen patents I've earned for the company and how much those inventions have contributed to the bottomline.
2013-07-12 11:21:37 AM
1 votes:

Private_Citizen: WhippingBoy: Franko: HO-LEE-CRAP, I'm not alone.

13 years of programming skills: only $45k jobs out there
project management certification: everyone wants at least 10 yrs experience.

I'm seriously on the verge of dropping everything and just cleaning houses for a living.

No one makes big bucks because they have "programming skills". My eight year old son has "programming skills". You want to get ahead at work? Whenever some issue, problem, or otherwise unpleasant situation comes up, just say "I'll do it!"

Observe:

Boss: "We need someone to fly to Korea tomorrow (Dec 23) and debug a problem one of our customers is having"
You: "I'll do it!"

Boss: "The developer who wrote this application just quit, and we need someone to take responsibility for his garbled spaghetti code"
You: "I'll do it!"

Boss: "Someone clogged the office toilet with a toxic dump and it needs to be unclogged"
You: "I'll do it!"

That's it. That's all you need to do.

See in a meritocracy, that would work. In the real world, your boss ignores you and takes credit for your hard work. When he finally retires, the big bosses hire from the outside, since for years all your boss has said about you is how lazy you are and how he's always having to clean up your messes.


This.
And when the big boss hires the replacement boss, he hires the young up and coming who starts out near your pay so he doesn't have to give you a raise.  Which means for the next few years, you have to train him to catch up.  Behind your back he rattles on about your 'bad attitude' and looks to fire you in spite of your 'bank of knowledge'.

Did I miss anything?
2013-07-12 11:17:26 AM
1 votes:

Silverstaff: Anti-drug program, was very popular in the US in the '80's and '90's, where a police officer comes into schools and lectures students on the evils of illegal drugs, usually giving in-depth explanations of street names, appearance, and details of drugs, along with extremely stern warnings to never use them and lots of worst-case scenarios of everything that will go wrong if you ever touch marijuana (or god-forbid, anything harder than that) even once.


The DARE program has been proven to be a disaster. Now that they have looked at the results years later DARE kids are MORE likely to use drugs.

It's almost like a cop lying to you and saying stupid shiat to you at an early age reduces your respect for the law.
2013-07-12 11:12:33 AM
1 votes:

WhippingBoy: Franko: HO-LEE-CRAP, I'm not alone.

13 years of programming skills: only $45k jobs out there
project management certification: everyone wants at least 10 yrs experience.

I'm seriously on the verge of dropping everything and just cleaning houses for a living.

No one makes big bucks because they have "programming skills". My eight year old son has "programming skills". You want to get ahead at work? Whenever some issue, problem, or otherwise unpleasant situation comes up, just say "I'll do it!"

Observe:

Boss: "We need someone to fly to Korea tomorrow (Dec 23) and debug a problem one of our customers is having"
You: "I'll do it!"

Boss: "The developer who wrote this application just quit, and we need someone to take responsibility for his garbled spaghetti code"
You: "I'll do it!"

Boss: "Someone clogged the office toilet with a toxic dump and it needs to be unclogged"
You: "I'll do it!"

That's it. That's all you need to do.


See in a meritocracy, that would work. In the real world, your boss ignores you and takes credit for your hard work. When he finally retires, the big bosses hire from the outside, since for years all your boss has said about you is how lazy you are and how he's always having to clean up your messes.
2013-07-12 11:09:15 AM
1 votes:

Charlie Freak: Biggest difference I've seen between Xers and millennials at work is that millennials wait to be told and have to be told to do anything. They don't go figure out how to do things very well - about zero creativity and no autodidaction. It's even worse for my kids generation. Holy shiat. Then they expect a cookie any time they come up with something that's been done the same way for 30 years.


THIS. Holy balls, it's at the point where these people (now approaching 30, FFS) can't take a shiat without explicit approval of their plan.
2013-07-12 10:56:51 AM
1 votes:

Silverstaff: steerforth: Girion47: steerforth:

No one on the planet wants to be characterised by their supposed "generation", and fair enough. It is useful for demographers, as Ishkur has eloquently pointed out, but apart from that it means fark all except as an excuse to biatch about others and as a tool for marketers.

Then again, I rang my mother the other day to say happy 64th birthday, and she not only joked about the Beatles song but told me she and her partner had been over to see a similarly aged couple that afternoon, and were subsequently joined by another couple. Apparently they all sat around discussing whether an Australian, British, New Zealand or Canadian pension was more lucrative and which to apply for, all the while smoking doobies, the raw ingredients of whi ...

meanwhile they pushed D.A.R.E. down your throat as you were growing up?

D.A.R.E? Dare to be different? Truth or dare?

Drug Abuse Resistance Education.

Anti-drug program, was very popular in the US in the '80's and '90's, where a police officer comes into schools and lectures students on the evils of illegal drugs, usually giving in-depth explanations of street names, appearance, and details of drugs, along with extremely stern warnings to never use them and lots of worst-case scenarios of everything that will go wrong if you ever touch marijuana (or god-forbid, anything harder than that) even once.


Gotcha. No, as far as I can tell D.A.R.E seems to be a purely American piece of bullshiat. My parents just told me not to get caught.
2013-07-12 10:53:36 AM
1 votes:

steerforth: Girion47: steerforth:

No one on the planet wants to be characterised by their supposed "generation", and fair enough. It is useful for demographers, as Ishkur has eloquently pointed out, but apart from that it means fark all except as an excuse to biatch about others and as a tool for marketers.

Then again, I rang my mother the other day to say happy 64th birthday, and she not only joked about the Beatles song but told me she and her partner had been over to see a similarly aged couple that afternoon, and were subsequently joined by another couple. Apparently they all sat around discussing whether an Australian, British, New Zealand or Canadian pension was more lucrative and which to apply for, all the while smoking doobies, the raw ingredients of whi ...

meanwhile they pushed D.A.R.E. down your throat as you were growing up?

D.A.R.E? Dare to be different? Truth or dare?


Drug Abuse Resistance Education.

Anti-drug program, was very popular in the US in the '80's and '90's, where a police officer comes into schools and lectures students on the evils of illegal drugs, usually giving in-depth explanations of street names, appearance, and details of drugs, along with extremely stern warnings to never use them and lots of worst-case scenarios of everything that will go wrong if you ever touch marijuana (or god-forbid, anything harder than that) even once.
2013-07-12 10:43:28 AM
1 votes:

THE GREAT NAME: Bollocks to the BBC and their "this content is not for domestic viewing" crap. Enjoy my license fee payments you assholes.


You're a boot-strappy conservative. Why don't you move somewhere better?
2013-07-12 10:29:02 AM
1 votes:

Darke: steerforth: Darke: Phinn: snowshovel: Anyway....I'd probably give the millenials the internet (which I can argue that Generation X may get)...but the millenials more importantly get: always on social connections.

Late Boomers built personal computers and the web software itself, Gen-X built the post-web Internet and blogging, but the Millenials have built the latest round of social media and a lot of apps.

What's the deal with the Gen-Y/Millenial constant social media thing, anyway?  Before the web, Gen-Xers (like me) were the kind of people to keep a Post Office box instead of getting mail at home.  (It helps keep Sallie Mae off our backs.)  The last thing we'd do is put our entire lives online.

I just want to say that Gen Y is NOT the same as Millenials.  Unlike the younguns, I CAN hold a face-to-face conversation, ignore facebook, and hold a steady job.

/apparently I'm invisible to whomever writes these stupid articles.

Yes they are. Some retard working in advertising just decided to change the name.

>.< goddammitsomuch.  I should probably actually wiki it before i type.  I stand corrected.

/doesn't mean I have to like it.  I might be technically a millennial (85), but I have nothing in common with them.


No one on the planet wants to be characterised by their supposed "generation", and fair enough. It is useful for demographers, as Ishkur has eloquently pointed out, but apart from that it means fark all except as an excuse to biatch about others and as a tool for marketers.

Then again, I rang my mother the other day to say happy 64th birthday, and she not only joked about the Beatles song but told me she and her partner had been over to see a similarly aged couple that afternoon, and were subsequently joined by another couple. Apparently they all sat around discussing whether an Australian, British, New Zealand or Canadian pension was more lucrative and which to apply for, all the while smoking doobies, the raw ingredients of which one couple currently propagates, tends and sells to such an extent that they don't even need a pension, even though they are entitled to one.  That is so boomer it's farking BOOMER.
2013-07-12 09:51:40 AM
1 votes:

Ishkur: Silverstaff: Seriously, my mother was a prototype helicopter parent.

Boomers have a tendency to "overparent". A lot of it comes from their own experiences growing up. Boomers, across the board, universally reviled their parents (and violently fought against their parents generation as soon as they were old enough to). They were raised by the war generation; indeed, some households mimic'd the military barracks their fathers had become accustomed, with utmost discipline and loyalty demanded at all times. Boomers did not have unhappy childhoods, but they grew to resent the stark discipline, rigid morality, and harsh hierarchical structure that their war vet fathers enforced.

So when the Boomers had children of their own, they vowed to not raise them the way they were raised. So instead of being a taskmaster, they sought to be their child's best friend, and involve themselves in every aspect of their child's lives, and give them unconditional affirmation and confidence. And now we're seeing the result of that: A generation that has never been told no, that is conditioned to receive praise and acceptance for everything they do, and expect to be rewarded not for succeeding, but just for the attempt.

The solution, of course, is somewhere in the middle. What children really need from their parents is not a drill sergeant and definitely not a best buddy -- what they need is an actual farking parent.


My dad was a marine Vietnam vet with severe PTSD and 2 purple hearts.

Please tell me how he wasn't a taskmaster and my "buddy"
2013-07-12 09:43:46 AM
1 votes:

Silverstaff: These "generation" distinctions are a little artificial.

I was born in 1978.  A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X.  The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

The thing is, I have little in common with Gen X.  I never knew who Kurt Cobain was at the time, and for quite a while when other kids were talking about Nirvana in school I thought Buddhism was a fad.  I never listened to grunge music, and I was sheltered enough from a lot of pop culture as a kid I didn't have many of the same cultural touchstones of Gen X (aside from watching the fall of communism, the destruction of Challenger, the Gulf War, ect).

On the other hand, whenever I read about Millennials, I read it and think "that's me".  Grew up around the rise of the PC and the internet, had a devil of a time even finding a job when I went into the workforce, part of a generation which was told from childhood that a college education is self-justifying and to just go and you'll be able to pay for those student loans later. . .

. . .but authors and demographers and such keep wanting to call me a Generation X'er because I was born in '78,


The only generational distinction with hard numbers behind is the baby boom, because it's an actual thing which occurred after WWII and until about 1964, which is when there was a real, statistical drop in the annual birthrate.

All the cultural touchstones marked with Gen. X and the millenials are the same thing, because the boomers were around during all of it. They didn't disappear for 30 years while Kurt Cobain and the internet happened. They watched all that sh*t go down too.

We should accept that the most likely cause of all this sh*t is powerful people sucking up all the resources, and pissing on the middle class and poor, while we are told to fight over the scraps.
2013-07-12 09:30:22 AM
1 votes:

Darke: Phinn: snowshovel: Anyway....I'd probably give the millenials the internet (which I can argue that Generation X may get)...but the millenials more importantly get: always on social connections.

Late Boomers built personal computers and the web software itself, Gen-X built the post-web Internet and blogging, but the Millenials have built the latest round of social media and a lot of apps.

What's the deal with the Gen-Y/Millenial constant social media thing, anyway?  Before the web, Gen-Xers (like me) were the kind of people to keep a Post Office box instead of getting mail at home.  (It helps keep Sallie Mae off our backs.)  The last thing we'd do is put our entire lives online.

I just want to say that Gen Y is NOT the same as Millenials.  Unlike the younguns, I CAN hold a face-to-face conversation, ignore facebook, and hold a steady job.

/apparently I'm invisible to whomever writes these stupid articles.


Yes they are. Some retard working in advertising just decided to change the name.
2013-07-12 09:29:32 AM
1 votes:

WhippingBoy: "I'll do it!"

That's it. That's all you need to do.


There's a reason you're called WhippingBoy, right?

Sucking up to the man will get you nowhere. And you'll never get rich working for somebody else.
2013-07-12 09:28:36 AM
1 votes:

snowshovel: Anyway....I'd probably give the millenials the internet (which I can argue that Generation X may get)...but the millenials more importantly get: always on social connections.


As a small child in the 70s, I grew up with 3 TV channels, a rotary phone, the local newspaper & the public library as the only sources of news/information...yet by the time I entered college, we had multiple cable TV channels & personal computers which could dial into this new thing called "the world wide web". Many people were starting to get personal cell phones as well.

That's a pretty radical change in the flow of information, most of it occurring within the span of one decade (the 80s). So really, I'm honestly not sure what technology I'd ascribe to GenXers since so much of it changed - and kept changing - during our childhoods/teen years.
2013-07-12 09:18:10 AM
1 votes:

Doc Daneeka: Sometimes.
I loved arcades, but they were clearly already declining when I was a kid.
I was in the prime age for NES/SNES when I was a kid, and they were clearly already displacing arcades.


Congratulations: You're Generation-X.

The Millenials don't even recognize an era where you had to leave your house to play video games.
2013-07-12 09:00:09 AM
1 votes:

crappie: Farkbert: I don't know....I managed to do fairly well, but doing so meant:

1.) Busting my ass non stop.  (hint: if you've never worked 60-80 hour weeks for a couple years straight you haven't busted ass yet)
2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.
3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.
4.) Proving my worth again and again, but also always demanding compensation that is in line with my contributions.  I walked out of a job once because management lied about potential future stock options that never had any chance of happening.

/ in the end, they brought me back in with an agreement to pay me commissions on products sold, which was a very nice deal
// I quit 6 months later to go to a new startup, which in the end was a much better deal

That's called luck....don't confuse it with work.


Oh I bet it was a lot of work, it`s just that the work done had nothing to do with the resulting situation, which was getting lucky with a new startup offer.

I remember some great words written on the wall outside the employmenty office in the 80`s, they said "WE WANT JOBS, NOT WORK"

boomers won`t get that...
2013-07-12 08:58:45 AM
1 votes:
HO-LEE-CRAP, I'm not alone.

13 years of programming skills: only $45k jobs out there
project management certification: everyone wants at least 10 yrs experience.

I'm seriously on the verge of dropping everything and just cleaning houses for a living.
2013-07-12 08:49:44 AM
1 votes:

FLMountainMan: I guess I lucked out.  36 years old, executive position in my organization.  Of the 22 other people who have my job across the state, I'm the youngest, but 6 are retiring in the next five years.  Three retired this past year and 40-50yr olds filled all the vacancies.  Of course, I work in government, so more people are are able to retire than in the private sector.

I actually think Gen X is pretty set, demographically speaking.  The boomers can't live forever.


Yes and no.

As a few have pointed out in this thread, when Boomers retire the job sometimes goes away through attrition/defunding, or the job gets handed *woosh* over our heads and down to someone who's 30 or younger.

A lot of Gen X'ers are or soon will be facing this fun fact: After years of biding our time, the Millenials won't want us around. Don't want that icky old age to rub off on them. Only problem is we still have a good 20 years left in our career life span. The boomers and their kids will fark us one last time.

On the other hand a disproportionate number of us went from things like starting zines and bands in the 80s to starting dot coms in the 1990s and 2000's.. and/or were ground floor or early adopter on a whole bunch of these fun technologies you now use daily without knowing much about them, like TCP/IP and BGP... Anyone who started a career as a techie in the 1990s has loads of options now, many of them quite good indeed.. So we know how to make things, build things,always have. We'll be fine.

Ageism is a thing though. I can't get past how it suddenly is to be considered OLD looking by people out in the neighborhood or on the job. Not age 30 old, but age 50 old. The one you can't recover from. The one that says gtfo pops you don't know anything. Using technologies and environments that my peers and I helped build.

Thats a very wordy "Get off my lawn."
2013-07-12 08:48:06 AM
1 votes:
What I got from the Article:

Our generation feels like were stuck behind the big bad monolithic Boomer generation and they wont retire before those sweet talking upstart Millennials position themselves to take our jobs so were going to job surf our way to advancement by proving that we don't need this job and we don't like this company and fark all of you, were taking our candy and were going home!

Here's the thing...If you prove you can't be relied upon, no one is going to rely on you.

I've worked for one company.  I started at the bottom of it.  I never asked for a raise.  I never threatened to leave.  Now I run the company and money...isn't a problem.  Sooooooo.
Maybe the whole, lets jump ship as soon as we hit rapids isn't the best move.  K?


/Born in 76'
//hated Nirvana
///Ready...Player...One.

////cool beans.  (I had to stab myself after typing that.)
2013-07-12 08:45:55 AM
1 votes:

GardenWeasel: I've seen this movie. Your Father was aloof and your Mother pushy because you are really a bastard child and she needs you to be upwardly mobile to atone for her sins. Does she have more pills and alcohol than the corner CVS?


I don't know what movie you're talking about, but yeah, my father was very aloof.  He worked incredibly hard and was gone most of the time.  He did make an effort when I was in High School to move to a less time-intensive position at work so he could spend more time with be before he went off to college, but I was in my teens before I saw my dad more than a few hours a week.

It's not like we've ever done DNA tests, but I'm the spitting image of what my dad looked like at my age.  Seriously, looking at old photos of him, the family resemblance is amazing.

My mother, yeah she drank constantly.  She liked to hide it.  The only time as a kid I noticed anything was funny was when I accidentally reached for her glass of coke one day instead of mine on the living room table.  She had a very strong amaretto and coke.  She was very heavily addicted to xanax for many years, even attempted suicide using them in a massive overdose about 5 years ago.  She says she's clean and off the alcohol and pills now, but I have no way to verify that.

steerforth: Your mom needed a job.


She had a job.  She used to be a buyer for a department store chain.  When she got pregnant with me, she had some complications, so she went on maternity leave a little early.  Once I was born, she devoted herself to being a full-time mother, and I was the 100% focus of her life from the day I was born, until around my junior year of college.

What changed?  Well, I went off to college, but that didn't stop her smothering.  I had a phone with an answering machine in my dorm room (remember, mid-to-late 90's, no cell phone), and she'd leave me a half-dozen messages during the day while I was in class.  She'd call me in the morning to wake me up, and want to talk for a half-hour or more every night before I went to sleep.

My dorm roommate positively hated the fact that my mother would constantly call wanting to talk to me and I wasn't in.  I didn't blame him.  In later years, once I got a cellphone, she would call me pretty much every hour to just say hi, to tell me what's coming on TV, to just chat.

She insisted on me coming home every weekend, so she'd spoil me with lavish dinners and luxuries.

What changed was I finally, at long last, got a social life.  I made actual friends (not just the kids of her friends who I was told to be friends with), I got a social life.  I moved out of the dorms, and out of my parents house (which apparently did a serious number on her mental health, already fragile) and got a job to support myself.  She freaked out at the idea that her son would be working at a convenience store.  In her mind, I was a College Student, so I deserved a "good job" like working in an office or something, not doing lowly retail work.  It wasn't pretty, and me seeking independence just accelerated her drinking and pill popping.

She has tried a few times to get a job.  The problem is, that her entire skill set painfully obsolete.  She has no idea how to use a computer.  She was very proud for many years that she didn't know how to use a computer, and if she needed to look anything up online, she'd call me on the phone and have me do it.  She used to practically brag she didn't know how to even turn the computer on.  She can use a basic cellphone, and a fax machine, but anything more advanced and she's lost.  She can't go back to being a department store buyer now.  She had an architectural draftsman's license in the mid 70's, but she's 40 years out of practice.  She refuses to do any manual labor.  She basically has no job skills, refuses to believe she needs to get any job skills, and blames this problem on "kids and those microsoft things".
2013-07-12 08:38:21 AM
1 votes:

Kriggerel: Oh boy!
 This is the thread where every Gen Xer who dares to complain about getting handed a ration of shiat will be upbraided one one side as not bootstrappy enough by the FYIGM boomers still fellating Reagan's corpse, while hearing the dulcet cries of I EXPECT RESPECT!!! from the millennials on the others.
Fun times, fun times!


No. This is the thread where a bunch of people complain that their shiat sandwich is somehow worse than everybody else's shiat sandwich.
2013-07-12 08:35:52 AM
1 votes:
Alonjar:

/because nobody else wears flannel

Never been to Maine, huh?  If you ain't wearing flannel and driving a Subaru you ain't doing it right.
2013-07-12 08:35:24 AM
1 votes:
Work to live.  You're doing it wrong.
2013-07-12 08:35:19 AM
1 votes:

Ishkur: mbillips: Generational groupings are the stupidest possible way to categorize people. I was born in '62; what do I have in common with someone born in '45 (other than remembering cars without seatbelts)? Gen X is supposedly '65 to '79? So if you were 21 in 2000, you were a peer of someone who was 35? No.

It has to do with post-war families. Boomer families had more children for longer, typically between 3-5 boomer kids over a period of 15 years, starting in 1946. Xer families had 1-3 kids, almost all in the 70s, and Millenial families had mostly 1 child in the late 80s. Almost never more than 2. This is due to the fact that child-rearing is becoming prohibitively expensive for modern societies.


I've seen that up close. I was born in '64. I have absolutely nothing in common with the generation that was born just ten years earlier, or ten years after. The older ones had, for the most part, better schools, cheaper access to higher education, and real apprenticeships still existed. The younger was gifted with a severely aged teacher workforce and school systems that had been butchered to the marrow to support Reagan's "throw bucketfulls of money" policies toward the Military and his owners in the supporting industries.

One of my best buds in high school was born in 65, his pop was wounded somewhere in France about a month after crossing the beach at Normandy. His oldest brother was killed in Vietnam in the mid-1960s. His youngest brother was born after that. Their mother was a nurse in some Army hospital in England and thats how their parents met. Their parents had 6 kids over the span of 24 years. Guessing, their mom was in her mid-40s when she had her last baby. Their sister was the original "knocked-up in high school" chick when the party scene took over world in the late 1970s.

My generation, born in the area around '62-'67 just didn't have a lot of kids. An awful lot of the people I knew who graduated high school in the early 1980s didn't have more than one or two, if any at all. Well, with the exception of Bob, he had something like 8 kids, but he started early and just a few months ago became a great-grampa, and he's still married to the woman he knocked up in our senior year. He's happier than a duck in a summer rainstorm. His family has been very productive.

I envy that a little bit.
2013-07-12 08:30:10 AM
1 votes:

Farkbert: I don't know....I managed to do fairly well, but doing so meant:

1.) Busting my ass non stop.  (hint: if you've never worked 60-80 hour weeks for a couple years straight you haven't busted ass yet)
2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.
3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.
4.) Proving my worth again and again, but also always demanding compensation that is in line with my contributions.  I walked out of a job once because management lied about potential future stock options that never had any chance of happening.

/ in the end, they brought me back in with an agreement to pay me commissions on products sold, which was a very nice deal
// I quit 6 months later to go to a new startup, which in the end was a much better deal


That's called luck....don't confuse it with work.
2013-07-12 08:27:07 AM
1 votes:
Thanks to the death of the pension boomers can't afford to retire, which makes getting jobs by younger generations even harder. But hey, not having to pay pensions means higher stock dividends, right?
2013-07-12 08:24:40 AM
1 votes:

Graffito: Omahawg: every time they want me to do more work I just say "that's cool. now how about some more pay?"

then they don't give me any more work.

so I can sit on fark dispensing wisdom while posting wesley willis songs on facebook

I see the problem.

When I was coming up the way to get ahead was to take on more work and responsibility (particularly for women and minorities).  After you proved that you could do it you might get a raise and/or promotion.  The work place has never been a perfect meritocracy, but if you are not willing to take on more challenges don't expect a promotion.  (I.e. don't expect the promotion first.)


You valued yourself so little that you were willing to work for free? Hope your glorious bosses never took advantage of that.
2013-07-12 08:19:23 AM
1 votes:

Silverstaff: Boomers, in the 60's they were saying to never trust anybody over 30, who went to Woodstock, who got high as a kite on MJ, who were the hippies and flower children who weren't trusted by the "Greatest Generation" who thought that everything was falling apart because the kids these days didn't want to work and just wanted to listen to Rock & Roll music and party and avoid responsibility. . .are now acting just like their parents did way-back-when and acting like they were always super-hard working industrious people who never took the time to enjoy their youth and see the young of today as shiftless and lazy.


The dead truth is that every generation is exactly the same, with two principle modifiers:

1) Each generation acts in accordance with its age bracket (with young people seeking freedom and recreation and older people seeking security, family, and political jurisprudence)

2) Each generation acts in accordance with the size of its population. As I said earlier, larger population groups tend to be dumber, greedier, and more full of themselves because they prop themselves up through self-reinforced rhetoric.
2013-07-12 08:17:43 AM
1 votes:
It's kind of crazy how many of my friends have started their own businesses, but it's equally crazy how many of those businesses revolve around  providing services to people who have jobs that take up all their time.
2013-07-12 08:16:33 AM
1 votes:

snowshovel: Throughout much of the early video era (late 70's - all of the 80's), video games were an almost exclusive boys club, and a somewhat derogatory club at that. Being labelled a "video game geek" was NOT cool. And this doesn't take into account that video games were pretty much ignored by females or frowned upon by girls/women until fairly recently.


What are you talking about? The video arcade was the coolest place to be in the 80s and lots of girls were there. Moreover, it was something that existed just for Xers because it died out in the 90s when everyone got home consoles. For a brief period, it was THE hangout if you were underage.
2013-07-12 08:10:50 AM
1 votes:

Silverstaff: Seriously, my mother was a prototype helicopter parent.


Boomers have a tendency to "overparent". A lot of it comes from their own experiences growing up. Boomers, across the board, universally reviled their parents (and violently fought against their parents generation as soon as they were old enough to). They were raised by the war generation; indeed, some households mimic'd the military barracks their fathers had become accustomed, with utmost discipline and loyalty demanded at all times. Boomers did not have unhappy childhoods, but they grew to resent the stark discipline, rigid morality, and harsh hierarchical structure that their war vet fathers enforced.

So when the Boomers had children of their own, they vowed to not raise them the way they were raised. So instead of being a taskmaster, they sought to be their child's best friend, and involve themselves in every aspect of their child's lives, and give them unconditional affirmation and confidence. And now we're seeing the result of that: A generation that has never been told no, that is conditioned to receive praise and acceptance for everything they do, and expect to be rewarded not for succeeding, but just for the attempt.

The solution, of course, is somewhere in the middle. What children really need from their parents is not a drill sergeant and definitely not a best buddy -- what they need is an actual farking parent.
2013-07-12 08:06:32 AM
1 votes:

cherryl taggart: I'm from the tail end of the Boomers, and work with a woman who just turned 70.  She is drawing SS, has an inheritance she just came into, and draws 2 salaries here (1 parttime,1 fulltime).  She is always talking about retiring and her debt load at the same time.  She gets all uppity when any of the rest of us actually stick to our work schedule, because she is available at any moment to run by the office.  Make my position full time, pay me enough to have dependable utilities and food, and then maybe I won't be watching the clock.  Because if I miss that 2:57 bus, I'm late to my evening job, you old biddy.


I call bullshiat.  Or she's guilty of fraud.
2013-07-12 08:05:22 AM
1 votes:

buckets_of_fun: As a millennial, I can say that my generation is pretty retarded overall.  But just you wait till the younger generation (whatever they're called) gets into the 'real' world.  They'll out-do us for sure!


Strauss & Howe (authors of the book "Generations") have already named Generation Z as the "Homeland Generation".
2013-07-12 08:04:57 AM
1 votes:

bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....


Perhaps, but I'm 29 (so sort of a millennial?) and I have to say, Albus Dumbledore was a far better role model than most celebrities that I see on tv. Harry Potter was/is my escape from some rough times, and I'm not ashamed to say that fictional characters from books helped me far more than falling for a band member or film star. And it is definitely a series that is well-known throughout the world.

Your mileage may vary on that though, as we are all different.
2013-07-12 08:02:34 AM
1 votes:

bathbubble: steerforth: bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....

Don't worry, dear. Lindsay Lohan may pop her clogs any moment and then you too can feel as misunderstood as the rest of us.

Will Amy Winehouse or Heath Ledger do?


I'd argue the thousands of 9/11 victims for ours.
2013-07-12 08:01:11 AM
1 votes:

mbillips: Generational groupings are the stupidest possible way to categorize people. I was born in '62; what do I have in common with someone born in '45 (other than remembering cars without seatbelts)? Gen X is supposedly '65 to '79? So if you were 21 in 2000, you were a peer of someone who was 35? No.


Yes.  I am the youngest in my family.  My sister is the oldest. 8 kids.  Same generation.  When I was 21, she was 38.  Same generation.
2013-07-12 07:55:11 AM
1 votes:

bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....


That the music SUCKS.
2013-07-12 07:53:11 AM
1 votes:

Jensaarai: [i.imgur.com image 225x338]

/Any day now



*checks Amazon*

The cover copy for book X Saves the World by Jeff Gordinier says this: "In this simultaneously hilarious and incisive manifesto for a generation that's never had much use for manifestos, ..."

Hey, wait, I'm a Gen-Xer, and I love a good manifesto!
2013-07-12 07:44:33 AM
1 votes:

Cubansaltyballs: TommyymmoT: Cubansaltyballs: In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.

Bide your time, and position yourself.
It's temporary,
They'll be dead, or retired pretty damned soon.

F*ck em. I'm starting my own company.


You want me to come run it for you? I'm a very competent Boomer. I won't up and retire on you in a few years. I plan on working as long as I am healthy. I like working.
2013-07-12 07:42:53 AM
1 votes:

Tax Boy: Sid_6.7: You probably see the name of my agency in the news at least several times a year if you live in the US. But the jobs are vanishing, quickly. We have few if any Gen-Xers in our group. It's all people under 33 or so (I'm 29 myself) and people over 50. Huge gap in the middle. The old people aren't retiring,

This is why I (genxer) left the employ of the federal government close to 10 years ago. As soon as those 50-year-olds (they were 40-45 then) got all the management positions I knew that those positions wouldn't open up at all for essentially the rest of my career, so there was absolutely no possibility of promotion whatsoever until I hit around age 60.

Which sucked, because I really liked working there.


And when those people retire, the job vanishes due to budget cuts. My friend works for the SSA, and they've had three people retire through out the year with zero promotions or hires.
2013-07-12 07:31:53 AM
1 votes:
Born in '68... consider myself lucky to work at a Fortune 125 company that actually provides a pension. Of course i want to move up, but I'd be crazy to leave this company.
2013-07-12 07:22:42 AM
1 votes:

unlikely: These threads are almost as predictable as bicycle threads.

Boomer: Those gen X whiners just need to work harder.
Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire?
Millennial: We can't even GET jobs!
Boomer: Check back with me when you work as hard as WE did.
Everyone: Whatever, Gramps.

Someone posts a picture of the "Worked a summer job/bought a new car" "Quit a job/got a new one" shoops.

Yay.


That's a pretty good summation. We're done here
2013-07-12 07:16:14 AM
1 votes:

mbillips: Generational groupings are the stupidest possible way to categorize people. I was born in '62; what do I have in common with someone born in '45 (other than remembering cars without seatbelts)? Gen X is supposedly '65 to '79? So if you were 21 in 2000, you were a peer of someone who was 35? No.


It has to do with post-war families. Boomer families had more children for longer, typically between 3-5 boomer kids over a period of 15 years, starting in 1946. Xer families had 1-3 kids, almost all in the 70s, and Millenial families had mostly 1 child in the late 80s. Almost never more than 2. This is due to the fact that child-rearing is becoming prohibitively expensive for modern societies.
2013-07-12 07:09:03 AM
1 votes:

Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.


Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.

Xers, for what it's worth, tend to be the runts of the family.
2013-07-12 07:07:51 AM
1 votes:
Generational groupings are the stupidest possible way to categorize people. I was born in '62; what do I have in common with someone born in '45 (other than remembering cars without seatbelts)? Gen X is supposedly '65 to '79? So if you were 21 in 2000, you were a peer of someone who was 35? No.
2013-07-12 07:07:07 AM
1 votes:

OldTXwmn: Just retired boomer here, so I am getting a kick out of ....
I didn't have debt, have a freaky combo of two defined benefit retirement plans (what is left of social security and one other). Whoot. Freaky lucky skill set too, got recruiters calling me all the time to do some work, "aren't you getting bored?" "Don't you miss _____" Nah, I don't miss anything.. taking the grandkids to see One Direction next week, road trip :) I figure I better get what I put into social security back out before whatever happens to that happens, then if I need to I will work again.


lick my crack, asshole
2013-07-12 07:05:30 AM
1 votes:

Farkbert: I don't know....I managed to do fairly well, but doing so meant:

1.) Busting my ass non stop.  (hint: if you've never worked 60-80 hour weeks for a couple years straight you haven't busted ass yet)


Most of us have done this.  Doesn't help, just makes us sicker and tired and generall depressed as our personal lives/relationships wither and die.

2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.

Ain't no jobs, "whar jobs Obama, whar?"

3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.

Got me there, I've only changed industries 3 times, (no that wasn't sarcasm).  And in both 2 and 3 I haven't just picked up stakes and moved across the country repeatedly.  In my defense though?  Moving is expensive and several of my jobs involved mooching living space off of friends/family

4.) Proving my worth again and again, but also always demanding compensation that is in line with my contributions.  I walked out of a job once because management lied about potential future stock options that never had any chance of happening.

THERE we go.  I was raised with the good old protestant indoctrination of humility and honesty, which to any employer is a big neon sign saying, "please abuse the fark out of me."  We just recently had a fellow pass through our company who was living the proof of that particular reality.  He was a sleaze, more than that he had screwed the very company that was hiring him, twice, but was somehow re-hired.  He was making far more than most despite needing extensive orientation and he was generally lazy when not being observed.  He did all this by being able to lie well, and lie about himself.  He was a salesman, and specialized in selling himself.

The real problem is "we the people" are beaten.  My ENTIRE FARKING LIFE I have been told, "well in THIS economy, you're lucky to be paid whatever your getting" from more than just the employers.   I am told, "It's against the law to discuss your pay with other employees," and I have enough co-workers who think it's farking TRUE.  How am I supposed to find out, with my current position, what the industry standard is and whether I'm getting fair-market value or getting screwed?  The answer, of course, is to start taking more risks, telling more lies (sadly I'm a bad liar) and cutting enough ties that I can afford the blowback.  I've got responsibilities to kith and kin that I probably could have wriggled out of, if I had the personal dishonor to abandon them I'd have more savings, I could risk applying for a high-paying job in Alaska and either get more pay locally or just farking move to Alaska for 6-18 months.

But at the core, I'd need to be better at self-promotion and lying.  (well, "positive spinning" if you prefer)
2013-07-12 07:03:13 AM
1 votes:

Doc Daneeka: I'm confused.

I was born in 1981 and am currently 32.

Sometimes I see people my age described as Gen X and sometimes as Millennials.  I know that these things don't have hard-and-fast boundaries, but I never know which generation I supposedly belong to.


Are you hardworking and industrious or are you whiny and lazy?
2013-07-12 06:49:21 AM
1 votes:
Just retired boomer here, so I am getting a kick out of ....
I didn't have debt, have a freaky combo of two defined benefit retirement plans (what is left of social security and one other). Whoot. Freaky lucky skill set too, got recruiters calling me all the time to do some work, "aren't you getting bored?" "Don't you miss _____" Nah, I don't miss anything.. taking the grandkids to see One Direction next week, road trip :) I figure I better get what I put into social security back out before whatever happens to that happens, then if I need to I will work again.
2013-07-12 06:47:15 AM
1 votes:

largedon: The Southern Dandy: They always told us growing up, that watching TV would turn our brains to mush.  Gen-Xers are the proof.  Those brain-washed, cable news watching idiots have farked up this country to the point where I'm not sure it can ever recover.  No, scratch that. I sure it won't ever recover.

Actually most X'ers I know hardly watch TV at all.


I think he's either being facetious or projecting all over himself
2013-07-12 06:44:23 AM
1 votes:

The Southern Dandy: They always told us growing up, that watching TV would turn our brains to mush.  Gen-Xers are the proof.  Those brain-washed, cable news watching idiots have farked up this country to the point where I'm not sure it can ever recover.  No, scratch that. I sure it won't ever recover.


Actually most X'ers I know hardly watch TV at all.
2013-07-12 06:40:57 AM
1 votes:
where Mrs works is a glut of employees of all ages who have no need to work but do so anyway. widow lady, house paid for, insurance money out the wazoo, lives right down the road, nothing better to do. several co-workers married to spouses who have very successful businesses, they have no need for the extra income. trust fund babies, son of a major lottery winner, married to wealthy doctor, married to wealthy lawyer blah blah blah. go across the country and fire all these people who are taking away jobs from those who truly need the income, you'd have a lot more employees who appreciate their new jobs. you'd have a lot less people that live to chit chat around the water cooler too.
2013-07-12 06:32:38 AM
1 votes:
I don't know....I managed to do fairly well, but doing so meant:

1.) Busting my ass non stop.  (hint: if you've never worked 60-80 hour weeks for a couple years straight you haven't busted ass yet)
2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.
3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.
4.) Proving my worth again and again, but also always demanding compensation that is in line with my contributions.  I walked out of a job once because management lied about potential future stock options that never had any chance of happening.

/ in the end, they brought me back in with an agreement to pay me commissions on products sold, which was a very nice deal
// I quit 6 months later to go to a new startup, which in the end was a much better deal
2013-07-12 06:06:24 AM
1 votes:
Article is spot on. First job I had was as a scentless apprentice for Floyd the barber. Place reeked of bleach, and I got a sliver and I thought to myself, "Jesus doesn't want me for a sunbeam", and "I hate myself and want to die", so I quit. It's been 20 something years now, and I was thinking of starting a band, and just kind of living off my girlfriends salary. Daddy's little girl ain't a girl no more.
2013-07-12 05:58:43 AM
1 votes:

Omahawg: every time they want me to do more work I just say "that's cool. now how about some more pay?"

then they don't give me any more work.

so I can sit on fark dispensing wisdom while posting wesley willis songs on facebook


This.
2013-07-12 05:54:59 AM
1 votes:
every time they want me to do more work I just say "that's cool. now how about some more pay?"

then they don't give me any more work.

so I can sit on fark dispensing wisdom while posting wesley willis songs on facebook
2013-07-12 05:23:24 AM
1 votes:
13th Gen ISBN-13: 978-0679743651

A bit outdated now, but was a decent read that put things into perspective.

No Boomers at my workplace, they can't hang.

/<3 My job
2013-07-12 03:39:27 AM
1 votes:

TommyymmoT: Cubansaltyballs: In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.

Bide your time, and position yourself.
It's temporary,
They'll be dead, or retired pretty damned soon.


F*ck em. I'm starting my own company.
2013-07-12 01:56:15 AM
1 votes:

unlikely: These threads are almost as predictable as bicycle threads.

Boomer: Those gen X whiners just need to work harder. Whine!
Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire? Counter-whine!
Millennial: We can't even GET jobs! Weak bleet!
Boomer: Check back with me when you work as hard as WE did. Smuggery!
Everyone: Whatever, Gramps. Studied indifference...


Yay.


Yep way predictable.
2013-07-12 12:49:59 AM
1 votes:
loveisover.me
 
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