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(BBC-US)   Gen Xers ... the forgotten generation at work   (bbc.com) divider line 286
    More: Interesting, Gen Xers, Generation X, Pew Charitable Trusts, University of Guelph, middle management, acquiescence, latchkey kid, disaffection  
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17951 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jul 2013 at 5:08 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



286 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-12 02:05:12 PM  

ThatGuyGreg: I'm now 13 years into my career, after graduating, as a programmer, into the .com bust. Through those 13 years, I've been given a single promotion, and I'm pretty sure that was a carrot to try to keep me from quitting... didn't work.

That said, I've still gotten ahead by getting those promotions by jumping companies instead. I don't, for a second, understand gen-X folks and younger that stay at a company for 5 to 10 years at a time. Loyalty is for suckers - the bosses I've had that seemed like the nicest guys in the world, everyone's best friend, have always turned into a repulsive jerk the moment I'd turn in my notice. Real Jekyll & Hyde shiat. Don't be fooled for a second that your best-buddy boss won't get rid of you to save himself.


THIS!

I've had to jump jobs 3 times in 6 years.  First jump was because the contract I was working ended and they didn't have follow-up work.  I'll give them credit that they kept me as an employee so I could get the benefits and not say "unemployed" on applications.   2nd Jump was because the previous company called me with an offer for a significant raise and a much safer job, 3rd jump was the hardest.   I didn't want to leave my first company but I was tired of living in the DC area(all because of the people in the area, you're all shiatheads that deserve a foul death) but I found a place willing to let me work from home wherever I wanted to live, so I took it and moved to Louisville, KY, an awesomely cheap city with great night life.    Now I'm looking to jump again as it turns out my corporate overlords were just milking my current contract for as much as they could get and didn't plan on any followup work once the contract expired.
 
2013-07-12 02:20:47 PM  

smackdab: Basically the Boomers have gone to the party, banged all the women, drank all the booze, and smoked all the weed.  We Gen-X'rs are now at the party with used condoms to pick up, bottles and cans to throw away, with not even a roach left in an ashtray to enjoy.  I have seen boomers with union jobs vote to screw everyone after them with pay and benefits, all for a $2500 check from management.  The boomers have allowed corporations to turn the pension they receive into a 401K with some contribution and now the classic 401K with no contribition which is now the new normal.  They came home to mom's apple pie, we came home to no mom or dad until dinner.  My father the boomer went to work at 18.  I went to work at 13.  My millenial son went to work at 17.  I have been working my ass off almost my whole life.  My father has a high school education and is currently on a criuse to Italy and Spain. He retired at 62 because he worked for a European company that actually treats a person like a human being.  On the other hand I will work until I die because I work for a large American company that has cut benefits with no regret.  I also blame boomers for making up the bulk of the conservative tea bagger population that has stalled the progress of the country by their selfishness and disregard for anyone who disagrees with their dated and blatantly racist rhetoric.  They are afraid Obama's gonna take their shiat away from them.  He should.  They have done a poor job of leaving us the way their parents left them.  They have pisssed it away on themselves and I will not shed a tear as they begin to die off.



I'm a GenX-er and I started working at age 9. I operated the sand valve for $1 an hour while my dad sandblasted. He had a ninth-grade education and would come home every night with bloodshot eyes, coughing up silica sand. He was self-employed and couldn't afford health insurance for his family.

He told me how important it was to get an education so I wouldn't have to do what he did for a living. So I got one, and I don't do that for a living. I thank him for giving me the drive to succeed in getting out of that lifestyle rather than pissing and moaning about how hard life is.

Do you have any idea what a self-entitled whiner you sound like?
 
2013-07-12 02:26:27 PM  

ThatGuyGreg: I'm now 13 years into my career, after graduating, as a programmer, into the .com bust. Through those 13 years, I've been given a single promotion, and I'm pretty sure that was a carrot to try to keep me from quitting... didn't work.

That said, I've still gotten ahead by getting those promotions by jumping companies instead. I don't, for a second, understand gen-X folks and younger that stay at a company for 5 to 10 years at a time. Loyalty is for suckers - the bosses I've had that seemed like the nicest guys in the world, everyone's best friend, have always turned into a repulsive jerk the moment I'd turn in my notice. Real Jekyll & Hyde shiat. Don't be fooled for a second that your best-buddy boss won't get rid of you to save himself.


Then they complain to their boss that kids these days have no company loyalty. Company loyalty must be bought. A job could be crap, but short hours and big pay can make it tolerable; a job could be fun and easy, but if it doesn't pay the bills you have to move on.
 
2013-07-12 02:28:01 PM  
I learned my lesson.  Stay out of debt, the hard times are even harder when you have debt.

I suspect I may be able to stay in an IT Development job until my mid 50's (I'm 41).  This is because I am very good at what I do and do not care being paid under the median rate for my experience.   All I care about is keeping a job and paying off my debt.

Once I am debt free and have some decent savings (about 8 years) I will be able to scale down even more on my lifestyle.  I suspect I will not be employed from ~ 55-62 due to age discrimination, so I need to be able to live for 7 years off my savings before social security.   That leaves me 14 years to get my act together.

/cynical, yeah sure, so would you be if you worked in IT
 
2013-07-12 02:29:49 PM  

mbillips: Generational groupings are the stupidest possible way to categorize people. I was born in '62; what do I have in common with someone born in '45 (other than remembering cars without seatbelts)? Gen X is supposedly '65 to '79? So if you were 21 in 2000, you were a peer of someone who was 35? No.


Same here.  Given the speed of technological and culture change I think we need to cut up generations into 10-year chunks.

My brother and I are 5 years apart. While I remember life before the internet, computers, and cell phones (1986) my baby brother born in 1990 does not, he barely remembers dial-up and pagers.

I also got very lucky. I got a decent job right out of High School before the real estate and credit bubble burst so I got a leg up on my younger brothers and peers.
 
2013-07-12 03:13:32 PM  

fatbear: crappie: Farkbert: I don't know....I managed to do fairly well, but doing so meant:

1.) Busting my ass non stop.  (hint: if you've never worked 60-80 hour weeks for a couple years straight you haven't busted ass yet)
2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.
3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.
4.) Proving my worth again and again, but also always demanding compensation that is in line with my contributions.  I walked out of a job once because management lied about potential future stock options that never had any chance of happening.

/ in the end, they brought me back in with an agreement to pay me commissions on products sold, which was a very nice deal
// I quit 6 months later to go to a new startup, which in the end was a much better deal

That's called luck....don't confuse it with work.

You think he would have picked up the position at the startup without that work and experience? You think they hand those jobs out to any slacker with a pulse?

Keep investing in powerball tickets, dude.


I didn't say he didn't work hard but yeah that's luck.
 
2013-07-12 03:19:50 PM  

Peki: Omahawg: every time they want me to do more work I just say "that's cool. now how about some more pay?"

then they don't give me any more work.

so I can sit on fark dispensing wisdom while posting wesley willis songs on facebook

This.


All that.
 
2013-07-12 03:33:42 PM  

Peki: Omahawg: every time they want me to do more work I just say "that's cool. now how about some more pay?"

then they don't give me any more work.

so I can sit on fark dispensing wisdom while posting wesley willis songs on facebook

This.


Wow.  You guys sound like real go-getters.
 
2013-07-12 03:34:15 PM  

lack of warmth: Girion47: WhippingBoy: Girion47: My dad was a marine Vietnam vet with severe PTSD and 2 purple hearts.

Please tell me how he wasn't a taskmaster and my "buddy"

You: "You give me what I want, or I'll make the chopper noises again, dad!"
Dad: "No... no!!! Anything but that... of course you can have what you want... we're still buddies, right?"

More like

Dad:  You follow me around and pick up any speck of dirt I point out on the carpet or I'll throw more dishes at you or throw you down the steps again.
Me:  ......ok sir.

I got the same thing without that level of violence.  Mostly a lot of yelling and some mild form of violence.  He is a Vietnam era Army vet., didn't see combat.  It must have something to do with the training.  A few times I did get:
Dad: Did you take care of what I asked you to do?
Me: What?
then yelling, because he had told me to do something while I slept and I was suppose to remember to do it.  Somehow writing a note was too much for him.  When he wasn't yelling, it was lets go play a sport.

/only good moment was when my lil bro (9 yrs my jr) called me spoiled, dad ripped him good.
//I was too busy laughing at my bro to be mad.


I think we had the same dad...
 
2013-07-12 03:41:51 PM  

Torchsong: I'm GenX. People say we're apathetic but I don't really care.

My not-so-CSB: I watched my father work for a big company that was loyal to him, fostered his growth and development so he could be a greater asset to the corporation, paid a nice pension and extended benefits to his wife when he died. He was loyal to the company and the company was loyal to him. He's part of what I guess you'd call the Greatest Generation.

My baby-boomer sister saw this and got her degree and went to work for the same company. After about 15-20 years they pulled everyone's pension to pay for some CEO's golden parachute, and had the nerve to act surprised when everyone quit, giving them the finger when they left.

I saw what happened to my sister, and it only took one company doing that to me that I realized the only company I need to work for is Torchsong, Inc. (and its subsidiary, Mrs. Torchsong). To be honest, I'm surprised/ashamed I had to have one company do it to me before I realized it.

I'm GenX, and I've been gainfully employed since leaving college, but make no mistake, my employer. You will get my best work while I'm here*, but I am not loyal to you, your mission statement, or furthering your goals, because deep down I know you feel the same way about me. As long as we both understand and accept this, I think we'll get along great.

*Yes, savor the irony I'm typing this on the job (Hey, we do get breaks, y'know! :) )



I like the cut of your jib, old boy.
i39.tinypic.com
 
2013-07-12 03:45:57 PM  
It's Friday people and everyone in here is so pissy.  Chill the fark out and stop biatching about what you didn't get or don't have.  In 100 years, you will be gone and no one will give two shiats about this or any generations percieved problems.
 
2013-07-12 03:46:07 PM  

smackdab: Basically the Boomers have gone to the party, banged all the women, drank all the booze, and smoked all the weed.  We Gen-X'rs are now at the party with used condoms to pick up, bottles and cans to throw away, with not even a roach left in an ashtray to enjoy.  I have seen boomers with union jobs vote to screw everyone after them with pay and benefits, all for a $2500 check from management.  The boomers have allowed corporations to turn the pension they receive into a 401K with some contribution and now the classic 401K with no contribition which is now the new normal.  They came home to mom's apple pie, we came home to no mom or dad until dinner.  My father the boomer went to work at 18.  I went to work at 13.  My millenial son went to work at 17.  I have been working my ass off almost my whole life.  My father has a high school education and is currently on a criuse to Italy and Spain. He retired at 62 because he worked for a European company that actually treats a person like a human being.  On the other hand I will work until I die because I work for a large American company that has cut benefits with no regret.  I also blame boomers for making up the bulk of the conservative tea bagger population that has stalled the progress of the country by their selfishness and disregard for anyone who disagrees with their dated and blatantly racist rhetoric.  They are afraid Obama's gonna take their shiat away from them.  He should.  They have done a poor job of leaving us the way their parents left them.  They have pisssed it away on themselves and I will not shed a tear as they begin to die off.


And to think some people have the nerve to say that Gen-X'rs are whiny and petulant.
 
2013-07-12 03:52:38 PM  

Girion47: WhippingBoy: Girion47: My dad was a marine Vietnam vet with severe PTSD and 2 purple hearts.

Please tell me how he wasn't a taskmaster and my "buddy"

You: "You give me what I want, or I'll make the chopper noises again, dad!"
Dad: "No... no!!! Anything but that... of course you can have what you want... we're still buddies, right?"

More like

Dad:  You follow me around and pick up any speck of dirt I point out on the carpet or I'll throw more dishes at you or throw you down the steps again.
Me:  ......ok sir.


Sounds like my Dad as well.

Me: "Why don't you just vacuum?"
Dad: "Shut up and do as I say, I'm the man of the house!"
 
2013-07-12 03:55:36 PM  

crappie: lack of warmth: Girion47: WhippingBoy: Girion47: My dad was a marine Vietnam vet with severe PTSD and 2 purple hearts.

Please tell me how he wasn't a taskmaster and my "buddy"

You: "You give me what I want, or I'll make the chopper noises again, dad!"
Dad: "No... no!!! Anything but that... of course you can have what you want... we're still buddies, right?"

More like

Dad:  You follow me around and pick up any speck of dirt I point out on the carpet or I'll throw more dishes at you or throw you down the steps again.
Me:  ......ok sir.

I got the same thing without that level of violence.  Mostly a lot of yelling and some mild form of violence.  He is a Vietnam era Army vet., didn't see combat.  It must have something to do with the training.  A few times I did get:
Dad: Did you take care of what I asked you to do?
Me: What?
then yelling, because he had told me to do something while I slept and I was suppose to remember to do it.  Somehow writing a note was too much for him.  When he wasn't yelling, it was lets go play a sport.

/only good moment was when my lil bro (9 yrs my jr) called me spoiled, dad ripped him good.
//I was too busy laughing at my bro to be mad.

I think we had the same dad...


I think we all did.

My Dad was a Veitnam Vet who never saw action either.

Was Grandpa an Alcoholic and Grandma didn't pay enough attention to him?
 
2013-07-12 04:00:47 PM  
Yeah so I'm whining a little.  Wait until the boomers get really old.  They will use up every bag of blood and syringe we can donate or produce due to their sheer numbers.  Then we will all be whining as we have to take care of those who left us with nothing.
 
2013-07-12 04:06:30 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: dready zim: The boomers decided nobody could ever suffer like them so they engineered a world of hurt for their descendents. Gen X was the testbed for pretty mech every failed education policy, work scheme and housing policy and we bore the brunt of them. We have lived in a world of constant change and disruption. We were spawned in a recession and now we are back in familiar ground.

You are all farked.

We have come home.

I like that!

Gen X, as viewed by everybody:
[www.newgeography.com image 453x344]


What's interesting to me is that based on that chart I see a different group of divisions:
Boomers, currently ages 48-67 (I added three years to the 2010 ages)
Gen X, currently ages 36-48
??? generation, currently ages 26-36
Millennials, currently ages 16-26
Fate yet undetermined, currently ages 0-16

All the people I can think of that are really disillusioned with their jobs/careers, even if they've been successful, are 36 to 48. The millennials are the ones who got truly screwed by the recession, and have the helicopter parents/trophies/etc. I do think there's a case for an in-between generation that hasn't been well studied or marketed to.
 
2013-07-12 04:12:33 PM  

Phinn: The cover copy for book X Saves the World by Jeff Gordinier says this: "In this simultaneously hilarious and incisive manifesto for a generation that's never had much use for manifestos, ..."

Hey, wait, I'm a Gen-Xer, and I love a good manifesto!



He said "use", by which he most likely did not mean "appreciation of literature"

/with ya, though, manifestos are very entertaining
 
2013-07-12 04:17:19 PM  

trickymoo: Now, the gen thats coming up, the one after millenials, (what are they called?), *ooooph* Thats gonna be rough. Trophies for handing in your work on time!


I thought they were called "Emo Kids". Do they have an official name yet?
There is one in my house. They are OK, remind me of Mods a bit. Not the moderator kind of mods.
 
2013-07-12 04:31:19 PM  

mesmer242: The Irresponsible Captain: dready zim: The boomers decided nobody could ever suffer like them so they engineered a world of hurt for their descendents. Gen X was the testbed for pretty mech every failed education policy, work scheme and housing policy and we bore the brunt of them. We have lived in a world of constant change and disruption. We were spawned in a recession and now we are back in familiar ground.

You are all farked.

We have come home.

I like that!

Gen X, as viewed by everybody:
[www.newgeography.com image 453x344]

What's interesting to me is that based on that chart I see a different group of divisions:
Boomers, currently ages 48-67 (I added three years to the 2010 ages)
Gen X, currently ages 36-48
??? generation, currently ages 26-36
Millennials, currently ages 16-26
Fate yet undetermined, currently ages 0-16

All the people I can think of that are really disillusioned with their jobs/careers, even if they've been successful, are 36 to 48. The millennials are the ones who got truly screwed by the recession, and have the helicopter parents/trophies/etc. I do think there's a case for an in-between generation that hasn't been well studied or marketed to.


I'm 28 and think of myself as firmly Millenial, bolded criteria included.
 
2013-07-12 04:32:36 PM  
A generation, by definition, is 20 years.
 
2013-07-12 04:32:54 PM  

cloud_van_dame: Phinn: The cover copy for book X Saves the World by Jeff Gordinier says this: "In this simultaneously hilarious and incisive manifesto for a generation that's never had much use for manifestos, ..."

Hey, wait, I'm a Gen-Xer, and I love a good manifesto!

He said "use", by which he most likely did not mean "appreciation of literature"

/with ya, though, manifestos are very entertaining



I know, right?  Especially the preambles.  The middle parts can be long-winded, of course, but they usually start off with a real bang.  There's nothing like a total crackpot when he's laying out his declaration of principles.
 
2013-07-12 04:46:23 PM  
I'll play along.

Born in 74. Dad died due to complications from Agent Orange when I was 11.
My sister, born in 69, escaped as soon as she could.
It was me and my mom for most of my life.
   A fat kid, mostly due to steroids and my own "Son of Agent Orange" complications (plus being a young kid with a dead dad and a hardworking 2-job Mom, I turned to food, television, and later video games)
   I got my own house key as a gift when I was 9, like it was a big deal (it was, I could stay home alone) little did I know that i was a latch key kid and that because dad was in the hospital for what seemed most of my life I would only see my Mom for an hour or so a night.
 
2013-07-12 05:02:21 PM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: mesmer242: The Irresponsible Captain: dready zim: The boomers decided nobody could ever suffer like them so they engineered a world of hurt for their descendents. Gen X was the testbed for pretty mech every failed education policy, work scheme and housing policy and we bore the brunt of them. We have lived in a world of constant change and disruption. We were spawned in a recession and now we are back in familiar ground.

You are all farked.

We have come home.

I like that!

Gen X, as viewed by everybody:
[www.newgeography.com image 453x344]

What's interesting to me is that based on that chart I see a different group of divisions:
Boomers, currently ages 48-67 (I added three years to the 2010 ages)
Gen X, currently ages 36-48
??? generation, currently ages 26-36
Millennials, currently ages 16-26
Fate yet undetermined, currently ages 0-16

All the people I can think of that are really disillusioned with their jobs/careers, even if they've been successful, are 36 to 48. The millennials are the ones who got truly screwed by the recession, and have the helicopter parents/trophies/etc. I do think there's a case for an in-between generation that hasn't been well studied or marketed to.

I'm 28 and think of myself as firmly Millenial, bolded criteria included.


Really? Everybody I know in the 26+ age range is sort of stunned by the results of helicopter derp they're seeing in the just-younger set. I also don't know anyone in that age range who's been chronically unemployed - underemployed, yes, and with a lot of turmoil, yes, but able to work things out well enough to survive. Anyway, I was looking at where the troughs were in the graph, and it seems to me that there's a trough in the middle of the millenials that corresponds to what I've seen in real life.
 
2013-07-12 05:42:51 PM  
Yep pretty much.
Gen X and proud of it.  Going back to get my Masters.  Own my own business, AND work at a start up.

I say this to you X'ers..if you can afford it at all...get the MBA. Why?  Aside from it helping you to run your own business, and understand when someone is trying to screw you if you work for them, but  also because H1B Visas will be back with a vengeance if immigration reform passes.

When company's say, "We can't find anyone qualified to do the job."  What they REALLY mean is, "We can't find someone qualified who will work for 30k / year and be on call 24x7".  With the H1b visa, VOILA! Problem solved.  No more messing with silly international time zones...no more dealing with some foreign country's crappy infrastructure...nope..now you can can build your tech shantytown right next to the factory! And remember kids, if they complain, you can always send 'em back!! Or, bonus points if you threaten them with ......GITMO!  They're not 'Merkins, so  you can do what you want! Wheee!!
 
2013-07-12 06:12:13 PM  

Generation_D: FLMountainMan: I guess I lucked out.  36 years old, executive position in my organization.  Of the 22 other people who have my job across the state, I'm the youngest, but 6 are retiring in the next five years.  Three retired this past year and 40-50yr olds filled all the vacancies.  Of course, I work in government, so more people are are able to retire than in the private sector.

I actually think Gen X is pretty set, demographically speaking.  The boomers can't live forever.

Yes and no.

As a few have pointed out in this thread, when Boomers retire the job sometimes goes away through attrition/defunding, or the job gets handed *woosh* over our heads and down to someone who's 30 or younger.

A lot of Gen X'ers are or soon will be facing this fun fact: After years of biding our time, the Millenials won't want us around. Don't want that icky old age to rub off on them. Only problem is we still have a good 20 years left in our career life span. The boomers and their kids will fark us one last time.

On the other hand a disproportionate number of us went from things like starting zines and bands in the 80s to starting dot coms in the 1990s and 2000's.. and/or were ground floor or early adopter on a whole bunch of these fun technologies you now use daily without knowing much about them, like TCP/IP and BGP... Anyone who started a career as a techie in the 1990s has loads of options now, many of them quite good indeed.. So we know how to make things, build things,always have. We'll be fine.

Ageism is a thing though. I can't get past how it suddenly is to be considered OLD looking by people out in the neighborhood or on the job. Not age 30 old, but age 50 old. The one you can't recover from. The one that says gtfo pops you don't know anything. Using technologies and environments that my peers and I helped build.

Thats a very wordy "Get off my lawn."


Oh please.

Most, if not all, ageism in this society is perpetrated by old people against the young.  It is laughable to see any old person talk about ageism.
 
2013-07-12 06:17:54 PM  

mesmer242: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: mesmer242: The Irresponsible Captain: dready zim: The boomers decided nobody could ever suffer like them so they engineered a world of hurt for their descendents. Gen X was the testbed for pretty mech every failed education policy, work scheme and housing policy and we bore the brunt of them. We have lived in a world of constant change and disruption. We were spawned in a recession and now we are back in familiar ground.

You are all farked.

We have come home.

I like that!

Gen X, as viewed by everybody:
[www.newgeography.com image 453x344]

What's interesting to me is that based on that chart I see a different group of divisions:
Boomers, currently ages 48-67 (I added three years to the 2010 ages)
Gen X, currently ages 36-48
??? generation, currently ages 26-36
Millennials, currently ages 16-26
Fate yet undetermined, currently ages 0-16

All the people I can think of that are really disillusioned with their jobs/careers, even if they've been successful, are 36 to 48. The millennials are the ones who got truly screwed by the recession, and have the helicopter parents/trophies/etc. I do think there's a case for an in-between generation that hasn't been well studied or marketed to.

I'm 28 and think of myself as firmly Millenial, bolded criteria included.

Really? Everybody I know in the 26+ age range is sort of stunned by the results of helicopter derp they're seeing in the just-younger set. I also don't know anyone in that age range who's been chronically unemployed - underemployed, yes, and with a lot of turmoil, yes, but able to work things out well enough to survive. Anyway, I was looking at where the troughs were in the graph, and it seems to me that there's a trough in the middle of the millenials that corresponds to what I've seen in real life.


Helicoptering's gotten worse, but it was on its creep upward for our childhoods. We 26+'s are the group now realizing the hard way how worthless our Bachelors are and not doing very well at all.
 
2013-07-12 06:57:25 PM  

Graffito: Peki: Omahawg: every time they want me to do more work I just say "that's cool. now how about some more pay?"

then they don't give me any more work.

so I can sit on fark dispensing wisdom while posting wesley willis songs on facebook

This.

Wow.  You guys sound like real go-getters.


Really? In all three of my last jobs I've been "promoted" after three months. The promotion was all responsibility, no pay. One involved me becoming the export compliance *and* operations planner remotely for a plant in Mexico, all of which involved ITAR compliance. I was being paid as a $7 an hour temp. The one after that I got promoted to an advisory position that assisted over 80 agents in handling various customer service issues, again, as the lowest paid employee in the building (yup, janitor got paid more. I asked).

So fark you. When I've been told all my life that the reason women don't get raises is because they don't ask for them, and then YOU have the nerve to imply laziness or a lack of motivation when I refuse to take on extra work for no pay? Fark you. You be willing to work more for same pay is what causes us all to lose out on raises, because there is always someone who will take less money. STFU and realize you are driving down wages for all of us.
 
2013-07-12 07:08:15 PM  
Am I the only one around here who has consistently got promoted all my life and gotten more money to boot? Even jumping companies to make the transition upwards?
 
2013-07-12 07:29:35 PM  

DougTaupe: 13th Gen ISBN-13: 978-0679743651

A bit outdated now, but was a decent read that put things into perspective.

No Boomers at my workplace, they can't hang.

/<3 My job


You stab your job with a punch dagger?
 
2013-07-12 07:57:52 PM  

TommyymmoT: Cubansaltyballs: In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.

Bide your time, and position yourself.
It's temporary,
They'll be dead, or retired pretty damned soon.


missed the entire point of the article and the problem facing Gen Xers today. Gen Xers are relatively few and sanwiched between two humongous and influential group not to mentioned cultual differences.
When the big shot Boomer retires or make hiring decision he is going to skip over Gen Xer and hire the Millenial because the millenial is more tech savvy than the Gen Xer and he'll work as hard for had the price.
Unlike previous evolution of generational rotations, Gen Xer will be the one that one half step where people will skip.
 
2013-07-12 07:59:03 PM  
and I was apparently drunk and incoherent!
 
2013-07-12 07:59:59 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Ishkur: Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.

Xers, for what it's worth, tend to be the runts of the family.

Definitions of Gen X that I see generally extend it to birth dates in the early 80s. Then again, the Millennial gen is generally defined as starting in the early 80s. As a 1981 baby, this is the source of my confusion.

I'm often considered too young to really be part of Gen X. But I don't identify with the Millennial generation either. I think of Millennials as people either in college now or recent grads. I've been out of college a decade now.



I was born in 1980 myself, I'm perpetually confused which generation I belong to as well.   But I have heard that sometimes 1980 is the cut off for Gen-X and then again the cut off can be late 70's (around 1975 or 1978) which leaves me and a few other birth years out of a generation because typically the Millenniums don't reach my birth date.   I think  these years as the oddball or weird years because no one wants to claim them LOL (I guess they think we have generational cooties or something).  Anyway, I have also heard people refer to the years 1975 - 1985 as the MTV Generation.  I don't really want this to be what my generation is do you?  It is kind of a lame way to label a generation plus to some extent insulting.
 
2013-07-12 10:04:33 PM  
Bwhahahahahahahahahahahah!

Some reporter was really lazy as this article is about 10 years out of date. This has all ready happened, was happening in the 90's and 00's. I can't tell you the number of Boomer managers I had that whined at us X-ers about company loyalty or complained about the way we changed jobs at the drop of a hat. The real problem for huge corporations is that X-ers did not stick around to eat shiat, now they have to deal with the dregs of X-ers, who are incompetent, for those management jobs that are necessary or replace Boomers with Mellinials, who don't have enough experience. It is corporations that are finally waking up to the fact that the best and brightest of the X-ers are not in their organizational chart and never will be.
 
2013-07-12 10:12:47 PM  

ThatGuyGreg: I'm now 13 years into my career, after graduating, as a programmer, into the .com bust. Through those 13 years, I've been given a single promotion, and I'm pretty sure that was a carrot to try to keep me from quitting... didn't work.

That said, I've still gotten ahead by getting those promotions by jumping companies instead. I don't, for a second, understand gen-X folks and younger that stay at a company for 5 to 10 years at a time. Loyalty is for suckers - the bosses I've had that seemed like the nicest guys in the world, everyone's best friend, have always turned into a repulsive jerk the moment I'd turn in my notice. Real Jekyll & Hyde shiat. Don't be fooled for a second that your best-buddy boss won't get rid of you to save himself.


Well those of us who stay for longer then a couple of years have found a nice fat position. For example I've been with the my company as a Business Systems Analyst for the last 9 years, I've been promoted twice and I'm at the top of the pay band making just under six figures. I've got 20 days vacation, 13 sick days, both bankable, flex time, full dental, medical, and vision. Plus the work is ridiculously easy, so much so that if the benefits were not awesome I'd have moved on from boredom.

These are benefits and pay that most people only dream about, plus I'm being pushed to go into management, but why would I do that? The money is only slightly more, the hours are ridiculous, and the stress is insane. No I'll stay in IT and keep doing this for the next 30 years.
 
2013-07-12 11:21:26 PM  
'Kill them all', I'm a capitalist, born 1974. Grunge killed rock and roll.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kqw0Gz9GahM
 
2013-07-13 02:02:45 AM  

mesmer242: The millennials are the ones who got truly screwed by the recession


It's your first recession... they always feel that way. Just wait until the next one, you'll see.
 
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