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(BBC-US)   Gen Xers ... the forgotten generation at work   (bbc.com) divider line 286
    More: Interesting, Gen Xers, Generation X, Pew Charitable Trusts, University of Guelph, middle management, acquiescence, latchkey kid, disaffection  
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17921 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jul 2013 at 5:08 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-12 07:06:26 AM
It's really the people with business degrees (the shop class of college) who end up getting into positions of power, never leave, and demand all people for every job, have a minimum of ten years experience (five for masters) for entry level positions that pay nine dollars an hour.
 
2013-07-12 07:07:07 AM

OldTXwmn: Just retired boomer here, so I am getting a kick out of ....
I didn't have debt, have a freaky combo of two defined benefit retirement plans (what is left of social security and one other). Whoot. Freaky lucky skill set too, got recruiters calling me all the time to do some work, "aren't you getting bored?" "Don't you miss _____" Nah, I don't miss anything.. taking the grandkids to see One Direction next week, road trip :) I figure I better get what I put into social security back out before whatever happens to that happens, then if I need to I will work again.


lick my crack, asshole
 
2013-07-12 07:07:14 AM

Doc Daneeka: AverageAmericanGuy: Doc Daneeka: I'm confused.

I was born in 1981 and am currently 32.

Sometimes I see people my age described as Gen X and sometimes as Millennials.  I know that these things don't have hard-and-fast boundaries, but I never know which generation I supposedly belong to.

Are you hardworking and industrious or are you whiny and lazy?

Varies from day to day.


Definitely a Millennial. Gen Xers are hardworking and industrious all the time.
 
2013-07-12 07:07:51 AM
Generational groupings are the stupidest possible way to categorize people. I was born in '62; what do I have in common with someone born in '45 (other than remembering cars without seatbelts)? Gen X is supposedly '65 to '79? So if you were 21 in 2000, you were a peer of someone who was 35? No.
 
2013-07-12 07:09:03 AM

Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.


Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.

Xers, for what it's worth, tend to be the runts of the family.
 
2013-07-12 07:10:18 AM
Yeah!
A high powered career as a big froggie in a small pond: It's just how they roll.
Everybody wants the power, don't they?
 
2013-07-12 07:11:36 AM

Sid_6.7: It's different now, and mostly depends on a 401k. F*ck that. I have my own Roth IRA I max every year.


You funny.
 
2013-07-12 07:11:53 AM
So maybe I should ditch the flannel, Doc Martens, and stop plastering my cubicle with pictures of Winona Ryder circa 1992?
 
2013-07-12 07:12:26 AM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: So maybe I should ditch the flannel, Doc Martens, and stop plastering my cubicle with pictures of Winona Ryder circa 1992?


Eh. Whatever.
 
2013-07-12 07:13:07 AM
Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

Then that road dwindled down to a game path.

Then that game path dwindled down to nothing at all.

That has made all the difference.
 
2013-07-12 07:16:14 AM

mbillips: Generational groupings are the stupidest possible way to categorize people. I was born in '62; what do I have in common with someone born in '45 (other than remembering cars without seatbelts)? Gen X is supposedly '65 to '79? So if you were 21 in 2000, you were a peer of someone who was 35? No.


It has to do with post-war families. Boomer families had more children for longer, typically between 3-5 boomer kids over a period of 15 years, starting in 1946. Xer families had 1-3 kids, almost all in the 70s, and Millenial families had mostly 1 child in the late 80s. Almost never more than 2. This is due to the fact that child-rearing is becoming prohibitively expensive for modern societies.
 
2013-07-12 07:17:37 AM

Klopfer: Farkbert: 2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.
3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.

Uhm... Where I live you wouldn't be offered a job because obviously you are not reliable and would leave in a few months anyway.
There is a double standard where as an employee you are expected to be loyal to your company even though the company doesn't give a shiat about you, but to be honest I wouldn't hire you either.


I'm over forty years old.  I have changed jobs several times, but I haven't worked anywhere for less than 2 years, and two places have been over 5.  That is not unreliable.
 
2013-07-12 07:18:47 AM

steerforth: bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....

Don't worry, dear. Lindsay Lohan may pop her clogs any moment and then you too can feel as misunderstood as the rest of us.


Will Amy Winehouse or Heath Ledger do?
 
2013-07-12 07:19:31 AM

Ishkur: Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.

Xers, for what it's worth, tend to be the runts of the family.


Woo I was born during the bleakest malaise in the twentieth century! My generation was having so little sex and using so much birth control that I nearly wasn't born, oh yeaaaah!
 
2013-07-12 07:22:42 AM

unlikely: These threads are almost as predictable as bicycle threads.

Boomer: Those gen X whiners just need to work harder.
Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire?
Millennial: We can't even GET jobs!
Boomer: Check back with me when you work as hard as WE did.
Everyone: Whatever, Gramps.

Someone posts a picture of the "Worked a summer job/bought a new car" "Quit a job/got a new one" shoops.

Yay.


That's a pretty good summation. We're done here
 
2013-07-12 07:24:58 AM

Ishkur: Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.

Xers, for what it's worth, tend to be the runts of the family.




Definitions of Gen X that I see generally extend it to birth dates in the early 80s. Then again, the Millennial gen is generally defined as starting in the early 80s. As a 1981 baby, this is the source of my confusion.

I'm often considered too young to really be part of Gen X. But I don't identify with the Millennial generation either. I think of Millennials as people either in college now or recent grads. I've been out of college a decade now.
 
2013-07-12 07:25:48 AM
Born in '71 myself.. careers, promotions, aren't those urban legends?
 
2013-07-12 07:27:30 AM

Silverstaff: These "generation" distinctions are a little artificial.

I was born in 1978.  A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X.  The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

The thing is, I have little in common with Gen X.  I never knew who Kurt Cobain was at the time, and for quite a while when other kids were talking about Nirvana in school I thought Buddhism was a fad.  I never listened to grunge music, and I was sheltered enough from a lot of pop culture as a kid I didn't have many of the same cultural touchstones of Gen X (aside from watching the fall of communism, the destruction of Challenger, the Gulf War, ect).

On the other hand, whenever I read about Millennials, I read it and think "that's me".  Grew up around the rise of the PC and the internet, had a devil of a time even finding a job when I went into the workforce, part of a generation which was told from childhood that a college education is self-justifying and to just go and you'll be able to pay for those student loans later. . .

. . .but authors and demographers and such keep wanting to call me a Generation X'er because I was born in '78,


I was born in '72 and am a stereotypical Gen Xer. My parents were Boomers, having been born in the actual demographic baby boom in the late '40s. However, my SO was born in 1960 to parents born in the '30s and he has nothing in common with either Xers or Boomers. This dude was punk when punk was farking punk.

The cut-off date for Gen Y/Millennials is usually 1982, meaning the oldest of the generation turned 18 in 2000. I know it's horrible for you to be lumped in with us oldies, but you are Gen X. You should come around and chat to my SO and commiserate together on how no one understands you.
 
2013-07-12 07:29:19 AM
Generalization X
 
2013-07-12 07:29:54 AM

Sid_6.7: You probably see the name of my agency in the news at least several times a year if you live in the US. But the jobs are vanishing, quickly. We have few if any Gen-Xers in our group. It's all people under 33 or so (I'm 29 myself) and people over 50. Huge gap in the middle. The old people aren't retiring,


This is why I (genxer) left the employ of the federal government close to 10 years ago. As soon as those 50-year-olds (they were 40-45 then) got all the management positions I knew that those positions wouldn't open up at all for essentially the rest of my career, so there was absolutely no possibility of promotion whatsoever until I hit around age 60.

Which sucked, because I really liked working there.
 
2013-07-12 07:31:53 AM
Born in '68... consider myself lucky to work at a Fortune 125 company that actually provides a pension. Of course i want to move up, but I'd be crazy to leave this company.
 
2013-07-12 07:32:33 AM
I was not angry at my place in this until I was compared to Prince Charles.
 
2013-07-12 07:35:01 AM

bathbubble: steerforth: bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....

Don't worry, dear. Lindsay Lohan may pop her clogs any moment and then you too can feel as misunderstood as the rest of us.

Will Amy Winehouse or Heath Ledger do?


Oh no, dear. Heath was an Xer and Amy was close enough. I think you're going to have to go down the dead Bieber track to come anywhere near the impact of Dumbledore.
 
2013-07-12 07:39:43 AM

Doc Daneeka: Definitions of Gen X that I see generally extend it to birth dates in the early 80s. Then again, the Millennial gen is generally defined as starting in the early 80s. As a 1981 baby, this is the source of my confusion.

I'm often considered too young to really be part of Gen X. But I don't identify with the Millennial generation either. I think of Millennials as people either in college now or recent grads. I've been out of college a decade now.



Do you have any siblings? ...how old are they? ....how old were your parents when they had you? Were they Boomers?

One of the more common misconceptions about Xers is that they were the children of the Boomers. This is wrong -- well, some might be children of Boomer teenage pregnancies or early adults, but this wasn't common; the vast majority of Boomers held off having children until their 30s. Some Xers are younger siblings of Boomers, but most are actually late children of "war babies" (people born from 1939-1945).

Xers were not as large or as numerous as the Boomers so they could not affect society with their social inertia like the Boomers could. They could never lead trends, they could only follow them. They were often forgotten and left out in the cold, too small to be attractive to market forces or amass great social change. They were the first generation of the dual income family ethic. They were the latchkey kids forced to raise themselves because both parents always worked. Factor these altogether: Forgotten by the world because they don't matter, forgotten by the industry of society because they're a market minority, forgotten at home because no one's ever around..... and you have the surly, brooding angst canonized in grunge music, John Hughes movies and mcjobs. This crippling worldview germinates apathy and disillusionment. No identity, no purpose, no future, no label. They are X.

The Millenials are generally considered to be born between 82-99 with a peak year of 1990. They are the TRUE children of the Boomers. They are a much larger, much fatter demographic than the Xers, so their affect on social change is a lot more evocative. But they are not as large or as numerous as the Boomers. The problem with large population groups is they tend to be more full of themselves (because they have a ready supply of unconditional peer-affirmation)
 
2013-07-12 07:42:53 AM

Tax Boy: Sid_6.7: You probably see the name of my agency in the news at least several times a year if you live in the US. But the jobs are vanishing, quickly. We have few if any Gen-Xers in our group. It's all people under 33 or so (I'm 29 myself) and people over 50. Huge gap in the middle. The old people aren't retiring,

This is why I (genxer) left the employ of the federal government close to 10 years ago. As soon as those 50-year-olds (they were 40-45 then) got all the management positions I knew that those positions wouldn't open up at all for essentially the rest of my career, so there was absolutely no possibility of promotion whatsoever until I hit around age 60.

Which sucked, because I really liked working there.


And when those people retire, the job vanishes due to budget cuts. My friend works for the SSA, and they've had three people retire through out the year with zero promotions or hires.
 
2013-07-12 07:44:33 AM

Cubansaltyballs: TommyymmoT: Cubansaltyballs: In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.

Bide your time, and position yourself.
It's temporary,
They'll be dead, or retired pretty damned soon.

F*ck em. I'm starting my own company.


You want me to come run it for you? I'm a very competent Boomer. I won't up and retire on you in a few years. I plan on working as long as I am healthy. I like working.
 
2013-07-12 07:47:31 AM
You don't see us in the work place because we all decided to be brooding tortured artists like Ethan Hawke, rather than selling our souls to corporations and "Da Man" like Ben Stiller.    If you need to find us, you can find us in the convenient store at 2 a.m. stoned and sardonically snarking that Evian is naive spelled backwards.
 
2013-07-12 07:47:35 AM
I'm from the tail end of the Boomers, and work with a woman who just turned 70.  She is drawing SS, has an inheritance she just came into, and draws 2 salaries here (1 parttime,1 fulltime).  She is always talking about retiring and her debt load at the same time.  She gets all uppity when any of the rest of us actually stick to our work schedule, because she is available at any moment to run by the office.  Make my position full time, pay me enough to have dependable utilities and food, and then maybe I won't be watching the clock.  Because if I miss that 2:57 bus, I'm late to my evening job, you old biddy.
 
2013-07-12 07:48:01 AM

ordinarysteve: I work at a factory and the problem isn't boomers, lots of them are great workers, the problem is the ones who could retire but can't because they buried themselves in debt. As a result they stay into their 70s but no longer give two shiats about their jobs. Nothing is more annoying than fixing mistakes for someone who makes more than you and who confuses seniority with superiority.


do you work in a union shop?  i work in a factory too, and they fire people like that.  although nobody over the age of 60 should be working there anyway because its too physically demanding.  almost nobody in the whole shop is older than 45 or so, and second shift is composed almost entirely of 20-somethings.  good place to work though, i like my job.
 
2013-07-12 07:52:37 AM

Ishkur: Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.


Yeah, my parents were both born in the early '50's, and are quintessential boomers.  Right down to my grandfather being a WWII veteran who came home from the war to start a family and my father having this bizarre kismet of getting a high five-figure job despite having no college education, and my mother sincerely telling me when I went off to college in '96 that right after graduation I could get an "office job" by just having "any college degree" and walking into the office of "any firm downtown" and telling me student loan debt didn't matter because I would be able to pay it all off in just a few years after graduation because I'll be a college graduate.

Then again, my mother was HEAVILY pressuring me to go to law school, she believed that having a J.D. and passing the bar basically instantly meant you were going to be wealthy and affluent since lawyers make so much money.  I almost went down that road until some lawyers my family knew warned me that it is NOT like that anymore, and while I had the potential to be a pretty good attorney, the career field for them was positively swamped.

When for years the only work I could find was retail, warehouse and call center work, she'd just assume I was being lazy since I wasn't making $50k/year by my mid 20's like my father was at my age, and I have a degree and he didn't.  My mother assumed I was wanting to fail, since I didn't go to law school like she'd been telling me I would since grade school.

Seriously, my mother was a prototype helicopter parent.  Ever since I was in grade school, my mother was telling me how my life would go: I would be a Congressional Page in high school, go to an Ivy League college, I would go to law school, I would be a JAG Officer in the military (Reserve or Guard only), I would marry into a major political family (she was a huge fan of the Kennedys, her biggest dream was for me to somehow marry into that family, but she'd "settle" for any political family she'd ever heard of), and I'd run for Congress around the time I was 30.  I had that future-biography recited to me from almost the time I entered school.  *sigh*
 
2013-07-12 07:53:11 AM

Jensaarai: [i.imgur.com image 225x338]

/Any day now



*checks Amazon*

The cover copy for book X Saves the World by Jeff Gordinier says this: "In this simultaneously hilarious and incisive manifesto for a generation that's never had much use for manifestos, ..."

Hey, wait, I'm a Gen-Xer, and I love a good manifesto!
 
2013-07-12 07:53:14 AM
Oh boy!
 This is the thread where every Gen Xer who dares to complain about getting handed a ration of shiat will be upbraided one one side as not bootstrappy enough by the FYIGM boomers still fellating Reagan's corpse, while hearing the dulcet cries of I EXPECT RESPECT!!! from the millennials on the others.
Fun times, fun times!
 
2013-07-12 07:55:11 AM

bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....


That the music SUCKS.
 
2013-07-12 07:57:50 AM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: So maybe I should ditch the flannel, Doc Martens, and stop plastering my cubicle with pictures of Winona Ryder circa 1992?


I'm literally warring doc martins and flannel right now. Hate is dripping onto my desk.
 
2013-07-12 07:58:32 AM

ordinarysteve: I work at a factory and the problem isn't boomers, lots of them are great workers, the problem is the ones who could retire but can't because they buried themselves in debt. As a result they stay into their 70s but no longer give two shiats about their jobs. Nothing is more annoying than fixing mistakes for someone who makes more than you and who confuses seniority with superiority.


That's why I just laugh when the unemployment numbers come out every month and handwringing goes on about "OMGZ, millions of people are leaving the workforce and have given up!!"   Good.   Most of them are Boomers who should be retiring anyway to clear out room the top for the next generation.    Most of them     keep working only because they've got to pay for an unsustainable level of consumption (and boy, Babyboomers love them some consumption.   The generation that brought us  an obesity epidemic, McMansion Housing Developments and 13 mph SUVs.   The only generation who when faced with an attack on American soil said "Fark it.  Let's cut taxes across the board, head to the malls and buy some shiat.  That's how we deal with crisis.   God Bless America).     In the end the goal in life shouldn't be to work until the day you drop dead, and maybe being forced into retirement will cause you to re-evaluate whether you really need 3 automobiles and a $175 a month cable/satellite bill.
 
2013-07-12 08:01:11 AM

mbillips: Generational groupings are the stupidest possible way to categorize people. I was born in '62; what do I have in common with someone born in '45 (other than remembering cars without seatbelts)? Gen X is supposedly '65 to '79? So if you were 21 in 2000, you were a peer of someone who was 35? No.


Yes.  I am the youngest in my family.  My sister is the oldest. 8 kids.  Same generation.  When I was 21, she was 38.  Same generation.
 
2013-07-12 08:02:34 AM

bathbubble: steerforth: bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....

Don't worry, dear. Lindsay Lohan may pop her clogs any moment and then you too can feel as misunderstood as the rest of us.

Will Amy Winehouse or Heath Ledger do?


I'd argue the thousands of 9/11 victims for ours.
 
2013-07-12 08:03:12 AM
As a millennial, I can say that my generation is pretty retarded overall.  But just you wait till the younger generation (whatever they're called) gets into the 'real' world.  They'll out-do us for sure!
 
2013-07-12 08:04:57 AM

bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....


Perhaps, but I'm 29 (so sort of a millennial?) and I have to say, Albus Dumbledore was a far better role model than most celebrities that I see on tv. Harry Potter was/is my escape from some rough times, and I'm not ashamed to say that fictional characters from books helped me far more than falling for a band member or film star. And it is definitely a series that is well-known throughout the world.

Your mileage may vary on that though, as we are all different.
 
2013-07-12 08:05:02 AM

Silverstaff: Yeah, my parents were both born in the early '50's, and are quintessential boomers. Right down to my grandfather being a WWII veteran who came home from the war to start a family and my father having this bizarre kismet of getting a high five-figure job despite having no college education, and my mother sincerely telling me when I went off to college in '96 that right after graduation I could get an "office job" by just having "any college degree" and walking into the office of "any firm downtown" and telling me student loan debt didn't matter because I would be able to pay it all off in just a few years after graduation because I'll be a college graduate.



I don't mean to laugh, but this made me laugh.

I see your name in lights, kid!  You'll be heading up the department in no time!

Say, you know what I'd do if I were your age?  I want to say one word to you. Just one word.  Are you listening?Plastics.  There's a great future in plastics. Think about it. Will you think about it?
 
2013-07-12 08:05:22 AM

buckets_of_fun: As a millennial, I can say that my generation is pretty retarded overall.  But just you wait till the younger generation (whatever they're called) gets into the 'real' world.  They'll out-do us for sure!


Strauss & Howe (authors of the book "Generations") have already named Generation Z as the "Homeland Generation".
 
2013-07-12 08:05:42 AM

Ishkur: largedon: Actually most X'ers I know hardly watch TV at all.

Television is a quintessential Boomer thing. They grew up with television, they evolved with it, they watched it advance and grow from the first grainy black & white shows in the 40s on three channels to today's HD broadcasts on several hundred. Boomers are inextricably linked with the social dominance of television -- they are the first generation to literally watch the whole world pass them by, from the Kennedy assassination to the moonlanding, Watergate, the Berlin Wall, the Gulf War and 9/11. They also remember with equal amounts of fondness Ricky Ricardo, Ginger vs Mary Ann, Kirk & Spock, Carol Burnett's tarzan yell, the last episode of MASH and who shot JR. Their parents had radio and their children have the internet, but television is theirs. They were born in the age of television and they will die in front of the television, slumped in their sofas, their remotes still in their hands.

/for Xers, it is video games.


In a lot of ways, I completely agree with this...but in others, not so much.

I was born 1967...so I'm pretty close to borderline boomer/GenX. I fully think that the whole television thing is true about Boomers. Television really defined what you did as a family at night as a kid, along with all of the next day's "water cooler" talk.

Now, as a male, I could agree about video game being a GenX defining thing. Ecept that you are ignoring half the population that are women.

Throughout much of the early video era (late 70's - all of the 80's), video games were an almost exclusive boys club, and a somewhat derogatory club at that. Being labelled a "video game geek" was NOT cool. And this doesn't take into account that video games were pretty much ignored by females or frowned upon by girls/women until fairly recently.

Heck, even in today's state, video games are still considered a boy's thing, and the games that females play are often considered as "games that don't really count".

Anyway....I'd probably give the millenials the internet (which I can argue that Generation X may get)...but the millenials more importantly get: always on social connections.
 
2013-07-12 08:06:13 AM
Speaking of generational conflict. . .

Boomers, in the 60's they were saying to never trust anybody over 30, who went to Woodstock, who got high as a kite on MJ, who were the hippies and flower children who weren't trusted by the "Greatest Generation" who thought that everything was falling apart because the kids these days didn't want to work and just wanted to listen to Rock & Roll music and party and avoid responsibility. . .are now acting just like their parents did way-back-when and acting like they were always super-hard working industrious people who never took the time to enjoy their youth and see the young of today as shiftless and lazy.
 
2013-07-12 08:06:32 AM

cherryl taggart: I'm from the tail end of the Boomers, and work with a woman who just turned 70.  She is drawing SS, has an inheritance she just came into, and draws 2 salaries here (1 parttime,1 fulltime).  She is always talking about retiring and her debt load at the same time.  She gets all uppity when any of the rest of us actually stick to our work schedule, because she is available at any moment to run by the office.  Make my position full time, pay me enough to have dependable utilities and food, and then maybe I won't be watching the clock.  Because if I miss that 2:57 bus, I'm late to my evening job, you old biddy.


I call bullshiat.  Or she's guilty of fraud.
 
2013-07-12 08:07:42 AM

Silverstaff: Ishkur: Silverstaff: I was born in 1978. A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X. The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

Gen-X is typically considered to be born from 64-79 with a peak year of 1971.

Demographics/sociology is about approximations and generalities, not specifics. You as an individual can choose to be anything you like -- either both or nothing. A single statistic is not relevant when plotting overall population trends. There are always going to be outliers, but their presence or existence is rarely pertinent. It's just wayward data.

With that said, the years 78-82 are weird years in that they are the lowest birth rates in the 20th century. There are hardly anybody from those age groups that are around, and whether they fit with the Xers or the Millenials tends to factor in with the age of their families ie: whether they are the youngest (will lean Xer) or the oldest (will lean Millenial) -- or have any siblings at all -- is a huge factor in developing a generation's outlook.

Yeah, my parents were both born in the early '50's, and are quintessential boomers.  Right down to my grandfather being a WWII veteran who came home from the war to start a family and my father having this bizarre kismet of getting a high five-figure job despite having no college education, and my mother sincerely telling me when I went off to college in '96 that right after graduation I could get an "office job" by just having "any college degree" and walking into the office of "any firm downtown" and telling me student loan debt didn't matter because I would be able to pay it all off in just a few years after graduation because I'll be a college graduate.

Then again, my mother was HEAVILY pressuring me to go to law school, she believed that having a J.D. and passing the bar basically instantly meant you were going to be wealthy and affluent since lawyers make so much money.  I almost went down ...


I've seen this movie. Your Father was aloof and your Mother pushy because you are really a bastard child and she needs you to be upwardly mobile to atone for her sins. Does she have more pills and alcohol than the corner CVS?
 
2013-07-12 08:07:57 AM

mike_d85: I'm literally warring doc martins and flannel right now. Hate is dripping onto my desk.


wait... you're a lumberjack?

/because nobody else wears flannel
 
2013-07-12 08:09:09 AM

enderthexenocide: ordinarysteve: I work at a factory and the problem isn't boomers, lots of them are great workers, the problem is the ones who could retire but can't because they buried themselves in debt. As a result they stay into their 70s but no longer give two shiats about their jobs. Nothing is more annoying than fixing mistakes for someone who makes more than you and who confuses seniority with superiority.

do you work in a union shop?  i work in a factory too, and they fire people like that.  although nobody over the age of 60 should be working there anyway because its too physically demanding.  almost nobody in the whole shop is older than 45 or so, and second shift is composed almost entirely of 20-somethings.  good place to work though, i like my job.


Nope, not union but there is the ever-looming prospect of unionization (several close votes in the past 30 years) so the end-result is all the negatives of unions like seniority and hesitation to fire lazy people, to help remove incentive to unionize, with none of the benefits such collective bargaining. They usually just shift the older employees to less rigorous jobs that amount to "make-work" positions. They also have made it clear in the last few years that they will just move to a developing country if we do unionize so it probably won't ever happen. This goes very well with constant cuts to wages and benefits, especially since '08. Multi-national corporations are so great.
 
2013-07-12 08:09:20 AM
When career boosts are simply handed out, then seniority/familiarity/loyalty is often rewarded.  If you want to move up without those, then you may want to make the opportunity yourself.  It's not easy, but it can be done if you present a formidable business case and spearhead the efforts required.  If you reach out to them with a great investment opportunity, likely within their own company, and can prove your case is solid, then you've unlocked the door to your own success.  No one will have to look carefully to find worth in you.
 
2013-07-12 08:10:50 AM

Silverstaff: Seriously, my mother was a prototype helicopter parent.


Boomers have a tendency to "overparent". A lot of it comes from their own experiences growing up. Boomers, across the board, universally reviled their parents (and violently fought against their parents generation as soon as they were old enough to). They were raised by the war generation; indeed, some households mimic'd the military barracks their fathers had become accustomed, with utmost discipline and loyalty demanded at all times. Boomers did not have unhappy childhoods, but they grew to resent the stark discipline, rigid morality, and harsh hierarchical structure that their war vet fathers enforced.

So when the Boomers had children of their own, they vowed to not raise them the way they were raised. So instead of being a taskmaster, they sought to be their child's best friend, and involve themselves in every aspect of their child's lives, and give them unconditional affirmation and confidence. And now we're seeing the result of that: A generation that has never been told no, that is conditioned to receive praise and acceptance for everything they do, and expect to be rewarded not for succeeding, but just for the attempt.

The solution, of course, is somewhere in the middle. What children really need from their parents is not a drill sergeant and definitely not a best buddy -- what they need is an actual farking parent.
 
2013-07-12 08:12:22 AM
Generation X:

Was a punk band with some guy named Billy Idol as the singer, from 1977 to 1982. Idol then had the idea he'd do better going solo.

Was a whiny novel about pop culture, by Douglas Coupland, Canadian. Canadians whine about American pop culture a BUNCH. Particularly American. It's their number 2 spectator sport, after hockey.

Is now: Clickbait term used by big media sites and their redirectors because someone realized we all are turning 50, and thus need to be pandered to. It'll stop in another year or so, as more Millenials can't find work, or more of their parents hit retirement / tea bag / die.
 
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