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(BBC-US)   Gen Xers ... the forgotten generation at work   (bbc.com) divider line 286
    More: Interesting, Gen Xers, Generation X, Pew Charitable Trusts, University of Guelph, middle management, acquiescence, latchkey kid, disaffection  
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17927 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jul 2013 at 5:08 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-12 12:20:14 AM
These threads are almost as predictable as bicycle threads.

Boomer: Those gen X whiners just need to work harder.
Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire?
Millennial: We can't even GET jobs!
Boomer: Check back with me when you work as hard as WE did.
Everyone: Whatever, Gramps.

Someone posts a picture of the "Worked a summer job/bought a new car" "Quit a job/got a new one" shoops.

Yay.
 
2013-07-12 12:29:07 AM

unlikely: Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire

die?


Bring on the death panels!

/kidding
//sorta
 
2013-07-12 12:49:59 AM
loveisover.me
 
2013-07-12 12:58:24 AM

penthesilea: unlikely: Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire die?


Bring on the death panels!

/kidding
//sorta


Yeah I forgot the "escalation" phase of the thread.
 
2013-07-12 01:54:40 AM
I have a decent job with the government. In fact, within my specialty (which, sadly, is not described as "drinking whiskey", in which case I'd be a millionaire at least) I'm one of the top people at my high-profile federal agency. You probably see the name of my agency in the news at least several times a year if you live in the US. But the jobs are vanishing, quickly. We have few if any Gen-Xers in our group. It's all people under 33 or so (I'm 29 myself) and people over 50. Huge gap in the middle. The old people aren't retiring, and with all the sequestration, even when they do, good luck seeing those jobs re-posted.

And people complain they can't get competent government employees, while also typically having terrible misconceptions of the benefits of being a federal employee. Example: to get the nice cushy federal pension everyone thinks we get, you would have had to have been hired around 1984. It's different now, and mostly depends on a 401k. F*ck that. I have my own Roth IRA I max every year.
 
2013-07-12 01:56:15 AM

unlikely: These threads are almost as predictable as bicycle threads.

Boomer: Those gen X whiners just need to work harder. Whine!
Gen Xer: Whatever, gramps. How 'bout you retire? Counter-whine!
Millennial: We can't even GET jobs! Weak bleet!
Boomer: Check back with me when you work as hard as WE did. Smuggery!
Everyone: Whatever, Gramps. Studied indifference...


Yay.


Yep way predictable.
 
2013-07-12 02:39:36 AM
In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.
 
2013-07-12 02:42:45 AM

Cubansaltyballs: In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.


Bide your time, and position yourself.
It's temporary,
They'll be dead, or retired pretty damned soon.
 
2013-07-12 03:39:27 AM

TommyymmoT: Cubansaltyballs: In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.

Bide your time, and position yourself.
It's temporary,
They'll be dead, or retired pretty damned soon.


F*ck em. I'm starting my own company.
 
2013-07-12 05:11:31 AM
Gen Xers are the backbone of today's workforce. We don't complain, we just do our farking jobs and we do it well.

Our age makes us the primary group making up management, and our experience makes us valuable employees.

Other age groups have their pros and cons, but right now Gen Xers are the most important group in the workforce.
 
2013-07-12 05:16:13 AM
Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.
 
2013-07-12 05:18:08 AM

CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.


Yeah, that was pretty heavy. A true legend.
 
2013-07-12 05:23:24 AM
13th Gen ISBN-13: 978-0679743651

A bit outdated now, but was a decent read that put things into perspective.

No Boomers at my workplace, they can't hang.

/<3 My job
 
2013-07-12 05:25:48 AM

TommyymmoT: Bide your time, and position yourself.
It's temporary,


AverageAmericanGuy: Gen Xers are the backbone of today's workforce. We don't complain, we just do our farking jobs and we do it well.

Our age makes us the primary group making up management, and our experience makes us valuable employees.

Other age groups have their pros and cons, but right now Gen Xers are the most important group in the workforce.


These.
 
2013-07-12 05:25:51 AM
If you're expecting anything other than a paycheck in today's world, you're going to be very disappointed. 

...that is all...
 
2013-07-12 05:27:53 AM
Suddenly, Anus Bees

i25.photobucket.com
 
2013-07-12 05:36:48 AM
i.imgur.com


/Any day now
 
2013-07-12 05:36:53 AM
I like reading articles about sociology, demographics and the "generations", and most of them almost always get a whole bunch of things wrong.

But this article was surprisingly accurate and on the mark with regards to how the Boomers, Xers and Millenials see themselves and each other.
 
2013-07-12 05:44:31 AM
The boomers decided nobody could ever suffer like them so they engineered a world of hurt for their descendents. Gen X was the testbed for pretty mech every failed education policy, work scheme and housing policy and we bore the brunt of them. We have lived in a world of constant change and disruption. We were spawned in a recession and now we are back in familiar ground.

You are all farked.

We have come home.
 
2013-07-12 05:45:51 AM
As the only GenXer at my last job, I agree with the article. I came to work, shut up and did my job. Management was in their 50's and 60's and the 25 year olds I worked with got all the credit. I miss the paycheck but I don't miss the job.
 
2013-07-12 05:47:26 AM
I work at a factory and the problem isn't boomers, lots of them are great workers, the problem is the ones who could retire but can't because they buried themselves in debt. As a result they stay into their 70s but no longer give two shiats about their jobs. Nothing is more annoying than fixing mistakes for someone who makes more than you and who confuses seniority with superiority.
 
2013-07-12 05:51:54 AM
I can see how the generation thing has screwed with my generation (X).
Most of the people who were my bosses when I started working had been promoted to management in their mid 30s. By the time I got there they were in their late 40s. And they are still there now, in their 60s, with no real desire to retire. Hell some of them are living off their superannuation already, salary sacrificing 100% of their wage to avoid tax and laughing as they screw the economy even more.
I have been lucky enough (and 'agile' enough - yay buzzwords) to get up alongside them on the ol' corporate ladder. But plenty of the gen X folk I see, seem stuck below the boomer logjam, not through lack of skill, ambition, education, ability or knowledge but just because there are only so many people you can promote to middle management and you can't make upper management without working your way up (or having daddy own the company).
 
2013-07-12 05:52:19 AM

CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.


It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.
 
2013-07-12 05:54:59 AM
every time they want me to do more work I just say "that's cool. now how about some more pay?"

then they don't give me any more work.

so I can sit on fark dispensing wisdom while posting wesley willis songs on facebook
 
2013-07-12 05:58:43 AM

Omahawg: every time they want me to do more work I just say "that's cool. now how about some more pay?"

then they don't give me any more work.

so I can sit on fark dispensing wisdom while posting wesley willis songs on facebook


This.
 
2013-07-12 06:04:55 AM
I forgot, who are we talking about again?
 
2013-07-12 06:06:24 AM
Article is spot on. First job I had was as a scentless apprentice for Floyd the barber. Place reeked of bleach, and I got a sliver and I thought to myself, "Jesus doesn't want me for a sunbeam", and "I hate myself and want to die", so I quit. It's been 20 something years now, and I was thinking of starting a band, and just kind of living off my girlfriends salary. Daddy's little girl ain't a girl no more.
 
2013-07-12 06:26:27 AM
They always told us growing up, that watching TV would turn our brains to mush.  Gen-Xers are the proof.  Those brain-washed, cable news watching idiots have farked up this country to the point where I'm not sure it can ever recover.  No, scratch that. I sure it won't ever recover.
 
2013-07-12 06:29:35 AM

The Southern Dandy: They always told us growing up, that watching TV would turn our brains to mush.  Gen-Xers are the proof.  Those brain-washed, cable news watching idiots have farked up this country to the point where I'm not sure it can ever recover.  No, scratch that. I sure it won't ever recover.


Baby boomers. You meant them, right?
 
2013-07-12 06:32:38 AM
I don't know....I managed to do fairly well, but doing so meant:

1.) Busting my ass non stop.  (hint: if you've never worked 60-80 hour weeks for a couple years straight you haven't busted ass yet)
2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.
3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.
4.) Proving my worth again and again, but also always demanding compensation that is in line with my contributions.  I walked out of a job once because management lied about potential future stock options that never had any chance of happening.

/ in the end, they brought me back in with an agreement to pay me commissions on products sold, which was a very nice deal
// I quit 6 months later to go to a new startup, which in the end was a much better deal
 
2013-07-12 06:39:08 AM
Hahaha, middle management problems.  If you aren't paid more then your manager you have room to grow or a job to quit and find one that realizes people who sign your vacation requests and run interference so you can get your work done are not always automatically worth more then the employees.
 
2013-07-12 06:40:57 AM
where Mrs works is a glut of employees of all ages who have no need to work but do so anyway. widow lady, house paid for, insurance money out the wazoo, lives right down the road, nothing better to do. several co-workers married to spouses who have very successful businesses, they have no need for the extra income. trust fund babies, son of a major lottery winner, married to wealthy doctor, married to wealthy lawyer blah blah blah. go across the country and fire all these people who are taking away jobs from those who truly need the income, you'd have a lot more employees who appreciate their new jobs. you'd have a lot less people that live to chit chat around the water cooler too.
 
2013-07-12 06:41:54 AM
I think the article was pretty accurate, especially in the portrayal of Gen X'ers.  At my last job, I was always caught between my two bosses (who were both Boomers, but on the young side of Boomers).  One boss, was convinced that I did nothing whereas the other boss fought him tooth and nail to keep me through all the rounds of layoffs as the economy bombed.  Even though I had designed every spreadsheet, form, data table, built an accredited lab, wrote the lab technician training manual, was the de facto IT person and scheduled all the technicians for field work it never felt like what I did was adequate or enough for the one boss.  I eventually just gave up trying to please him and did my job to the best of my ability.

Something I think that perplexes the Boomers about Gen X'ers is our refusal to put work over our families.  I think this stems from the fact that many of us grew up either in houses where the parents were not there (latchkey) or were divorced.  There's a reason divorce is at a 40 year low and it's Gen X http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303544604576430341393583 056.html.  We've placed our families above everything.  I would rather make less money and be able to attend my kid's games and coach they're teams then work OT every day so I can afford a mid-life crisis.  The one thing I decided when I got married is that my kids would never go through what I went through and they haven't to this point and hopefully they never will.
 
2013-07-12 06:42:13 AM
There are so many gross over-generalizations in that article, I think a Texas-sized brush just painted over my house.

/1972 baby... off the lawn
 
2013-07-12 06:44:23 AM

The Southern Dandy: They always told us growing up, that watching TV would turn our brains to mush.  Gen-Xers are the proof.  Those brain-washed, cable news watching idiots have farked up this country to the point where I'm not sure it can ever recover.  No, scratch that. I sure it won't ever recover.


Actually most X'ers I know hardly watch TV at all.
 
2013-07-12 06:46:41 AM

Farkbert: 2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.
3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.


Uhm... Where I live you wouldn't be offered a job because obviously you are not reliable and would leave in a few months anyway.
There is a double standard where as an employee you are expected to be loyal to your company even though the company doesn't give a shiat about you, but to be honest I wouldn't hire you either.
 
2013-07-12 06:47:15 AM

largedon: The Southern Dandy: They always told us growing up, that watching TV would turn our brains to mush.  Gen-Xers are the proof.  Those brain-washed, cable news watching idiots have farked up this country to the point where I'm not sure it can ever recover.  No, scratch that. I sure it won't ever recover.

Actually most X'ers I know hardly watch TV at all.


I think he's either being facetious or projecting all over himself
 
2013-07-12 06:47:23 AM

Ooba Tooba: Article is spot on. First job I had was as a scentless apprentice for Floyd the barber. Place reeked of bleach, and I got a sliver and I thought to myself, "Jesus doesn't want me for a sunbeam", and "I hate myself and want to die", so I quit. It's been 20 something years now, and I was thinking of starting a band, and just kind of living off my girlfriends salary. Daddy's little girl ain't a girl no more.


*golfclap*
 
2013-07-12 06:49:21 AM
Just retired boomer here, so I am getting a kick out of ....
I didn't have debt, have a freaky combo of two defined benefit retirement plans (what is left of social security and one other). Whoot. Freaky lucky skill set too, got recruiters calling me all the time to do some work, "aren't you getting bored?" "Don't you miss _____" Nah, I don't miss anything.. taking the grandkids to see One Direction next week, road trip :) I figure I better get what I put into social security back out before whatever happens to that happens, then if I need to I will work again.
 
2013-07-12 06:51:31 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

Yeah, that was pretty heavy. A true legend.


Courtney did it, and she didn't get prosecuted because the police fear her power.
 
2013-07-12 06:52:12 AM

steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.



I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....
 
2013-07-12 06:53:26 AM

markfara: AverageAmericanGuy: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

Yeah, that was pretty heavy. A true legend.

Courtney did it, and she didn't get prosecuted because the police fear her power.


This.
 
2013-07-12 07:00:07 AM

Cubansaltyballs: In my experience, a lot of Baby Boomers have jobs they should not have and only have them because some other Boomer promoted them. When they see a Gen Xer, they become afraid that some 35 year-old will show the world how incompetent they are.

It's protectionism. The faster this generation dies, the better off we'll all be.


well put. and so true...die old farkers
 
2013-07-12 07:00:39 AM
These "generation" distinctions are a little artificial.

I was born in 1978.  A few sources would call me a millennial, but most try to call me Generation X.  The cutoff date is always put somewhere in the late '70's, usually towards 1980.

The thing is, I have little in common with Gen X.  I never knew who Kurt Cobain was at the time, and for quite a while when other kids were talking about Nirvana in school I thought Buddhism was a fad.  I never listened to grunge music, and I was sheltered enough from a lot of pop culture as a kid I didn't have many of the same cultural touchstones of Gen X (aside from watching the fall of communism, the destruction of Challenger, the Gulf War, ect).

On the other hand, whenever I read about Millennials, I read it and think "that's me".  Grew up around the rise of the PC and the internet, had a devil of a time even finding a job when I went into the workforce, part of a generation which was told from childhood that a college education is self-justifying and to just go and you'll be able to pay for those student loans later. . .

. . .but authors and demographers and such keep wanting to call me a Generation X'er because I was born in '78,
 
2013-07-12 07:00:46 AM

bathbubble: steerforth: CarnySaur: Many Gen Xers graduated into weak job markets, carrying hefty student debt. Then, along the way, they lost ground in recessions, the dot-com bust, middle management downsizings and the housing market collapse.

They forgot to mention how none of us really recovered from the death of Kurt Cobain.

It defined our generation, much like the deaths of John Lennon and Albus Dumbledore have done for those that came before and after.


I feel like it says something about my generation that our "defining death" is that of a fictional character, but I'm not quite sure what that something is....


Don't worry, dear. Lindsay Lohan may pop her clogs any moment and then you too can feel as misunderstood as the rest of us.
 
2013-07-12 07:01:48 AM
I'm confused.

I was born in 1981 and am currently 32.

Sometimes I see people my age described as Gen X and sometimes as Millennials.  I know that these things don't have hard-and-fast boundaries, but I never know which generation I supposedly belong to.
 
2013-07-12 07:03:13 AM

Doc Daneeka: I'm confused.

I was born in 1981 and am currently 32.

Sometimes I see people my age described as Gen X and sometimes as Millennials.  I know that these things don't have hard-and-fast boundaries, but I never know which generation I supposedly belong to.


Are you hardworking and industrious or are you whiny and lazy?
 
2013-07-12 07:03:32 AM

largedon: Actually most X'ers I know hardly watch TV at all.


Television is a quintessential Boomer thing. They grew up with television, they evolved with it, they watched it advance and grow from the first grainy black & white shows in the 40s on three channels to today's HD broadcasts on several hundred. Boomers are inextricably linked with the social dominance of television -- they are the first generation to literally watch the whole world pass them by, from the Kennedy assassination to the moonlanding, Watergate, the Berlin Wall, the Gulf War and 9/11. They also remember with equal amounts of fondness Ricky Ricardo, Ginger vs Mary Ann, Kirk & Spock, Carol Burnett's tarzan yell, the last episode of MASH and who shot JR. Their parents had radio and their children have the internet, but television is theirs. They were born in the age of television and they will die in front of the television, slumped in their sofas, their remotes still in their hands.

/for Xers, it is video games.
 
2013-07-12 07:05:15 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Doc Daneeka: I'm confused.

I was born in 1981 and am currently 32.

Sometimes I see people my age described as Gen X and sometimes as Millennials.  I know that these things don't have hard-and-fast boundaries, but I never know which generation I supposedly belong to.

Are you hardworking and industrious or are you whiny and lazy?


Varies from day to day.
 
2013-07-12 07:05:30 AM

Farkbert: I don't know....I managed to do fairly well, but doing so meant:

1.) Busting my ass non stop.  (hint: if you've never worked 60-80 hour weeks for a couple years straight you haven't busted ass yet)


Most of us have done this.  Doesn't help, just makes us sicker and tired and generall depressed as our personal lives/relationships wither and die.

2.) Taking every opportunity to get ahead, including many job changes and joining 4 different early stage startups.

Ain't no jobs, "whar jobs Obama, whar?"

3.) Changing industries several times in order to be where the best opportunities are.

Got me there, I've only changed industries 3 times, (no that wasn't sarcasm).  And in both 2 and 3 I haven't just picked up stakes and moved across the country repeatedly.  In my defense though?  Moving is expensive and several of my jobs involved mooching living space off of friends/family

4.) Proving my worth again and again, but also always demanding compensation that is in line with my contributions.  I walked out of a job once because management lied about potential future stock options that never had any chance of happening.

THERE we go.  I was raised with the good old protestant indoctrination of humility and honesty, which to any employer is a big neon sign saying, "please abuse the fark out of me."  We just recently had a fellow pass through our company who was living the proof of that particular reality.  He was a sleaze, more than that he had screwed the very company that was hiring him, twice, but was somehow re-hired.  He was making far more than most despite needing extensive orientation and he was generally lazy when not being observed.  He did all this by being able to lie well, and lie about himself.  He was a salesman, and specialized in selling himself.

The real problem is "we the people" are beaten.  My ENTIRE FARKING LIFE I have been told, "well in THIS economy, you're lucky to be paid whatever your getting" from more than just the employers.   I am told, "It's against the law to discuss your pay with other employees," and I have enough co-workers who think it's farking TRUE.  How am I supposed to find out, with my current position, what the industry standard is and whether I'm getting fair-market value or getting screwed?  The answer, of course, is to start taking more risks, telling more lies (sadly I'm a bad liar) and cutting enough ties that I can afford the blowback.  I've got responsibilities to kith and kin that I probably could have wriggled out of, if I had the personal dishonor to abandon them I'd have more savings, I could risk applying for a high-paying job in Alaska and either get more pay locally or just farking move to Alaska for 6-18 months.

But at the core, I'd need to be better at self-promotion and lying.  (well, "positive spinning" if you prefer)
 
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