If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Hill)   The NSA scandal that wasn't a scandal that was a scandal then became a non-scandal about the time it was a scandal while at the end it wasn't is now a scandal again and this time it doesnt look too good for the US Government   (thehill.com) divider line 12
    More: Followup, NSA, U.S. Government, Microsoft, e-mail encryption, web chat, Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, SkyDrive, cloud storage  
•       •       •

3747 clicks; posted to Politics » on 11 Jul 2013 at 6:32 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-07-11 05:37:26 PM
3 votes:
Subs, the domestic surveillance programs are, and always have been, scandalous to everyone who is not ignorant, apathetic, partisan or authoritarian.
2013-07-11 08:18:14 PM
2 votes:
FTA:  Microsoft also gave the FBI easier access to its cloud storage service SkyDrive and let the NSA have access to email on Outlook and Hotmail before it was encrypted, according to the paper.

You want to know why businesses that give a rat's rancid rectum aren't putting mission-critical data in the cloud? That's why. The push for cloud-based applications and cloud-based services glosses over the fact that your cloud providers may be handing the keys to your kingdom over to agencies unknown, without your knowledge or consent.

If you put data in the cloud, you lose complete control over it. Period. It doesn't matter how many assurances your cloud provider is going to give you - at the end of the day, you no longer have complete control over it. The cloud is great for anything you would display in front of your home. It's useless for anything else.

If you run a business and you're thinking about putting your mission-critical data in the cloud, think hard about that decision.
2013-07-11 07:30:58 PM
2 votes:

Bloody Templar: Um, duh?  Law enforcement comes to Microsoft with a court order that orders Microsoft to provide data on a suspected terrorist.  Microsoft provides data in compliance with court order.  Same as any other company in the country.

What this "journalism" isn't addressing is what Microsoft has said all along.  They provide data mandated by court order only for specific users.  It's not like the government can just snoop on whoever they want without a warrant, whether they're looking at your data in the cloud or looking at your phone records or looking at.  It's same as its been since the concept of wiretapping a phone was invented.

Settle down.  Nobody's reading your damn email.  Or watching you through the Kinect.

/Microsoft employee, but my opinions are my own and do not represent my employer


This. The people who think the Big Bad Gummint is spying on them, personally, VASTLY overestimate their importance. The government has always had the power to bug your phone or get the records, intercept your mail, or otherwise collect whatever form of communications you use if they so desire. This is just an update of that for the modern era; because there's so much more data, the government is *collecting* more. I'm not saying that it's a *good* thing, but it's certainly not a *new* thing.

But there isn't some CIA spook sifting through your emails to grandma, or poking through your browser history and laughing at the weird porn. They don't care enough about you to do that.
2013-07-11 06:49:37 PM
2 votes:
Um, duh?  Law enforcement comes to Microsoft with a court order that orders Microsoft to provide data on a suspected terrorist.  Microsoft provides data in compliance with court order.  Same as any other company in the country.

What this "journalism" isn't addressing is what Microsoft has said all along.  They provide data mandated by court order only for specific users.  It's not like the government can just snoop on whoever they want without a warrant, whether they're looking at your data in the cloud or looking at your phone records or looking at.  It's same as its been since the concept of wiretapping a phone was invented.

Settle down.  Nobody's reading your damn email.  Or watching you through the Kinect.

/Microsoft employee, but my opinions are my own and do not represent my employer
2013-07-12 12:40:10 AM
1 votes:

LincolnLogolas: For anyone who's whining about this, but applauded gleefully when the USA PATRIOT Act was passed to "keep us safe from the terrorists", allow me to give you a big fat middle finger and a "I told you so".


This. When the PATRIOT act was going through Congress, THAT was our best shot at dismantling the surveillance state. If it had been shot down, we would've at least taken the first step towards cutting down the surveillance. Instead, we let our government pass it almost unanimously because we are farking cowards. We COULD have put the pressure on. We COULD have made it political suicide to support the act. But nope, most of the country cheered them on.

Now, it'll likely never go away, because we've shown that we, as a nation, are OK with it. Sure, for a month or two every few years, we'll get all outraged, but never angry enough for long enough to actually *do* anything.
2013-07-11 11:33:39 PM
1 votes:
Yep and all you pussies are sitting around like me joking about the situation instead of actively doing something about it. When are you going to finally realize that the government only cares about the tax money they steal from you to spend on lies. Also if they do not manipulate the election, your vote. Not that it means much anyways.

What is the last illness, in your lifetime, that had actually been cured? I, personally, cannot think of one. Most likely because the government (corporations) find it more profitable to treat you than cure you. Curing will empower the public when the governments want you to bend over and let them screw you at will. What pills do you "have" to take everyday? You know that people have successfully got rid of diabetes, but the change in eating habits required to fix this, are too expensive and put out of reach of the average joe.

And get it through your blinded eyes. It is NOT the "republicans" or "democrats". It's both of them. Together. The only thing a president can really do these days is VETO, lie, and tell stories (speeches) to the public. And that can be circumvented in may cases.

This whole NSA/Snowden thing is going to really get nasty. I hope countries overseas that are not involved take appropriate action against those whom have lied and broken our laws and rights. I can see this causing more leaks and re-opening investigations like the killing of Bin Laden, what "really" happened on 9-11, Iraq, and other things. America really needs a good slap to return itself to it's former glory.

Greatest Country in the World my ass.... One day long ago I used to wake up proud to be American. I am ashamed of my government. You should be too.

I love and am proud to be "American". Always will be. I detest the United States. The US is no longer "America" in my eyes. They are corporate controlled and bribed (campaign funds) liars that are only in for their own selfish and greedy interests.
2013-07-11 08:23:00 PM
1 votes:

NewportBarGuy: 4tehsnowflakes: The news today is that the companies were apparently allowed to litigate over the general warrants, provided they agreed to do so in the FISA court and that the pleadings, outcome and entire process would remain secret. It's some pale shadow of due process, like the military tribunal. The G said -- sure, you can litigate against us on this just like on anything else, just gotta do it in front of our handpicked judges who are already on board with the whole project. We are just beginning to see some of the legal fig leaves that were placed discreetly around the entire cluster-fark.

That's the part that disturbs me. I'm not a huge fan of Verizon or AT&T, or any of them. However, they have a goddamn right to fight this in a normal court that can keep much of the testimony and evidence under seal. The fact that you can only object to a FISa ruling through the FISA court seems to go against our entire history of rule of law. I'm sure I'm not phrasing that right. Hope you get what I mean.


About a week back, I ranted that the FISA court essentially forked our legal system - we have two legal systems now, one for public use and one for secret government use. This is an example of that forking. Anything FISA touches can only be handled through FISA, and instead of following legal precedent as was its original intent, FISA is now setting legal precedent, to change the way our legal system works in both branches.

If the FISA court has decided that the government can have your data, you may never know about it - but, if you find out by accident or through the actions of someone like Snowden, your only recourse is to take your claims to that same court, which will, of course, tell you to take a farking hike - but only after gagging you, so you can't tell anyone else what happened in that secret court.

Good luck with that whole "liberty" and "freedom" thing, folks, because it left the building.
2013-07-11 07:42:25 PM
1 votes:

NewportBarGuy: FuturePastNow: I doubt any company that wants government contracts is going to be so crass as to make them get a warrant for user data.

Ding! Ding!

Follow the money. Considering the Govt. is the largest customer in America, it's not wise to upset them.


I was taking this derp-dump in the Yahoo! thread, but I guess the bathroom is here now.  The G as customer is only part of the reason the companies complied.  There was also the threat of criminal charges if they chose to litigate the general warrants in the regular federal courts.  All the big tech companies seem to have complied, but some resisted harder than others.

I posted this in the Yahoo! thread:

The news today is that the companies were apparently allowed to litigate over the general warrants, provided they agreed to do so in the FISA court and that the pleadings, outcome and entire process would remain secret.  It's some pale shadow of due process, like the military tribunal.  The G said -- sure, you can litigate against us on this just like on anything else, just gotta do it in front of our handpicked judges who are already on board with the whole project.  We are just beginning to see some of the legal fig leaves that were placed discreetly around the entire cluster-fark.
2013-07-11 07:42:11 PM
1 votes:

LordJiro: Bloody Templar: Um, duh?  Law enforcement comes to Microsoft with a court order that orders Microsoft to provide data on a suspected terrorist.  Microsoft provides data in compliance with court order.  Same as any other company in the country.

What this "journalism" isn't addressing is what Microsoft has said all along.  They provide data mandated by court order only for specific users.  It's not like the government can just snoop on whoever they want without a warrant, whether they're looking at your data in the cloud or looking at your phone records or looking at.  It's same as its been since the concept of wiretapping a phone was invented.

Settle down.  Nobody's reading your damn email.  Or watching you through the Kinect.

/Microsoft employee, but my opinions are my own and do not represent my employer

This. The people who think the Big Bad Gummint is spying on them, personally, VASTLY overestimate their importance. The government has always had the power to bug your phone or get the records, intercept your mail, or otherwise collect whatever form of communications you use if they so desire. This is just an update of that for the modern era; because there's so much more data, the government is *collecting* more. I'm not saying that it's a *good* thing, but it's certainly not a *new* thing.

But there isn't some CIA spook sifting through your emails to grandma, or poking through your browser history and laughing at the weird porn. They don't care enough about you to do that.


It doesn't matter. The fact they are collecting the data is what matters. It would be like if the government put surveillance cameras in your house. Why would they watch you? You are just a regular citizen! It isn't like they could watch every house in the nation!

And anyone who thinks this isn't bad is likely a partisan hack, and since this is Fark, that should be expected.
2013-07-11 07:05:35 PM
1 votes:
I doubt any company that wants government contracts is going to be so crass as to make them get a warrant for user data.
2013-07-11 06:59:33 PM
1 votes:
Oh for fark's sake...

"Documents leaked by former government contractor Edward Snowden show that Microsoft helped the National Security Agency (NSA) work around the encrypted code on its new Outlook portal after the spy agency expressed concern that it wouldn't be able to intercept Web chats"

That's kind of the point, dickbags. WTF?
2013-07-11 05:11:43 PM
1 votes:
Who didn't already know that microsoft was evil?
 
Displayed 12 of 12 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report