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(Guardian)   Yahoo wants everyone to know that they really tried not to rat us all out to the Feds. Really   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 16
    More: Unlikely, rats, intelligence assessment  
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588 clicks; posted to Politics » on 11 Jul 2013 at 4:04 PM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



16 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-07-11 03:06:21 PM
Meh, people rat themselves out more than anyone else ever will.  They just love talking about themselves and giving their opinions and want everyone on facebook and twitter to know how their poop came out.
 
2013-07-11 03:33:57 PM
The company could have just saluted and said yes, sir, come on in, we support the troops.  As Verizon reportedly did (and dammit, 4ts is on Verizon because no one else has adequate coverage in the rural areas around here).  Lawyer time is expensive, and Yahoo! did not have to spend a penny fighting the orders.  Even if their motive was corporate marketing -- they suspected it would eventually come out and wanted to be able to tell their customers that they had protested -- the company still deserves 2 cheers for trying.
 
2013-07-11 04:06:22 PM
Now they know everything about your fantasy football team.
 
2013-07-11 04:08:54 PM

4tehsnowflakes: The company could have just saluted and said yes, sir, come on in, we support the troops.  As Verizon reportedly did (and dammit, 4ts is on Verizon because no one else has adequate coverage in the rural areas around here).  Lawyer time is expensive, and Yahoo! did not have to spend a penny fighting the orders.  Even if their motive was corporate marketing -- they suspected it would eventually come out and wanted to be able to tell their customers that they had protested -- the company still deserves 2 cheers for trying.


They could have gone public with it and actually done something about it. Instead they just objected strongly and then rolled over. They don't really deserve anything.
 
2013-07-11 04:09:14 PM
Yahoo! has been protecting citizens by being increasingly irrelevant.
 
2013-07-11 04:11:52 PM
They couldn't because no one uses them?
 
2013-07-11 04:15:47 PM
I'm concerned about the secrets given up by Ask Jeeves.

Oh no! All my personal information from Xanga has leaked!!!
 
2013-07-11 04:22:57 PM
Revealed: how Microsoft handed the NSA access to encrypted messages
• Secret files show scale of Silicon Valley co-operation on Prism
• Outlook.com encryption unlocked even before official launch
• Skype worked to enable Prism collection of video calls
• Company says it is legally compelled to comply


Since Prism's existence became public, Microsoft and the other companies listed on the NSA documents as providers have denied all knowledge of the program and insisted that the intelligence agencies do not have back doors into their systems.

Microsoft's latest marketing campaign, launched in April, emphasizes its commitment to privacy with the slogan: "Your privacy is our priority."

LOL pull the middle one
 
2013-07-11 04:41:52 PM

insertsnarkyusername: 4tehsnowflakes:  2 cheers

They could have gone public with it and actually done something about it. Instead they just objected strongly and then rolled over. They don't really deserve anything.


The only effect of "going public" would have been criminal charges against the company and probably its officers, potentially resulting in its collapse.  The company's counsel and directors, if they had seriously considered your idea, would have concluded that such action violates their duty to shareholders.  It would be naive to expect a publicly traded company to stick out its corporate neck and sacrifice its entire existence for principles.  That kind of sacrifice is made by individuals.  If only there was a word to describe an individual like that ...
 
2013-07-11 04:49:35 PM
I've been assured by the Fark Moderate Brigade that no information on american citizens was collected by the nsa. Merely information about information. I can't imagine what Yahoo! is talking about.
 
2013-07-11 05:50:12 PM

As if ripped from today's headlines!

Microsoft works closely with U.S. Intelligence services, reports  The Guardian, allowing interception of users' communications, email, and cloud storage. Glenn Greenwald, et al., offer the latest on the NSA's domestic surveillance program.

The documents show that:
• Microsoft helped the NSA to circumvent its encryption to address concerns that the agency would be unable to intercept web chats on the new Outlook.com portal;
• The agency already had pre-encryption stage access to email on Outlook.com, including Hotmail;
• The company worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide;
• Microsoft also worked with the FBI's Data Intercept Unit to "understand" potential issues with a feature in Outlook.com that allows users to create email aliases;
• Skype, which was bought by Microsoft in October 2011, worked with intelligence agencies last year to allow Prism to collect video of conversations as well as audio;
• Material collected through Prism is routinely shared with the FBI and CIA, with one NSA document describing the program as a "team sport".
 
2013-07-11 06:00:07 PM

Car_Ramrod: I'm concerned about the secrets given up by Ask Jeeves.

Oh no! All my personal information from Xanga has leaked!!!


farm3.static.flickr.com
/sorry
 
2013-07-11 06:35:58 PM

Evil High Priest: The documents


Whar documents?  No links to source material on this from the wacko birds at the Guardian?
 
2013-07-11 06:41:26 PM

Evil High Priest: As if ripped from today's headlines!

Microsoft works closely with U.S. Intelligence services, reports  The Guardian, allowing interception of users' communications, email, and cloud storage. Glenn Greenwald, et al., offer the latest on the NSA's domestic surveillance program.

The documents show that:
• Microsoft helped the NSA to circumvent its encryption to address concerns that the agency would be unable to intercept web chats on the new Outlook.com portal;
• The agency already had pre-encryption stage access to email on Outlook.com, including Hotmail;
• The company worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide;
• Microsoft also worked with the FBI's Data Intercept Unit to "understand" potential issues with a feature in Outlook.com that allows users to create email aliases;
• Skype, which was bought by Microsoft in October 2011, worked with intelligence agencies last year to allow Prism to collect video of conversations as well as audio;
• Material collected through Prism is routinely shared with the FBI and CIA, with one NSA document describing the program as a "team sport".


You forgot the important part:

The company reiterated its argument that it provides customer data "only in response to government demands and we only ever comply with orders for requests about specific accounts or identifiers".

And the only "government demands" that Microsoft responds to are legally binding court orders and subpoenas targeting specific users.

I seriously wish the NSA would declassify that part, since Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, Facebook, etc. are ALL saying the same thing.  There has been NO transfer of entire databases.  Just individual users, as mandated by court order.

/Microsoft employee, but my opinions are my own and do not represent my employer
//We DO take your privacy very seriously at all levels of the company
 
2013-07-11 07:13:50 PM

Bloody Templar: Evil High Priest:

legally binding court orders and subpoenas targeting specific users


It is question-begging to say that the companies complied with "legally binding" orders, because whether the agencies that demanded the access exceeded their constitutional authority to do so is in question.  It makes a beggar out of the legality question by assuming the answer.  More accurately you could say the companies resisted up to a point (some more than others) but ultimately agreed to comply.

The news is that the companies were apparently allowed to litigate over the general warrants, provided they agreed to do so in the FISA court and that the pleadings, outcome and entire process would remain secret.  It's some pale shadow of due process, like the military tribunal.  The G said -- sure, you can litigate against us on this just like on anything else, just gotta do it in front of our handpicked judges who are already on board with the whole project.

We are seeing the evolution of the legal fig leaves that were placed discreetly around the entire cluster-fark.
 
2013-07-12 03:06:17 AM

4tehsnowflakes: insertsnarkyusername: 4tehsnowflakes:  2 cheers

They could have gone public with it and actually done something about it. Instead they just objected strongly and then rolled over. They don't really deserve anything.

The only effect of "going public" would have been criminal charges against the company and probably its officers, potentially resulting in its collapse.  The company's counsel and directors, if they had seriously considered your idea, would have concluded that such action violates their duty to shareholders.  It would be naive to expect a publicly traded company to stick out its corporate neck and sacrifice its entire existence for principles.  That kind of sacrifice is made by individuals.  If only there was a word to describe an individual like that ...


At that stage making it public knowledge that this was going on could have killed the program entirely.
 
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