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(BBC)   The PC is dead. Long live the PC   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 123
    More: Obvious, emerging economies, IDC  
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6387 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Jul 2013 at 9:52 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-11 09:54:45 AM
So, all those people who 10-15 years ago bought PCs and continued buying PCs and would've bought a tablet instead are just buying tablets now? My world is upside down.
 
2013-07-11 09:56:16 AM
I'm curious if this accounts for folks that build their own PC's and don't buy from the standard retailer.
 
2013-07-11 09:57:59 AM
Better components that don't need to be upgraded as often to run the software that most people use? I've had my main computer essentially unchanged for four years now. It doesn't play Crysis on max settings, but it handles everything else I throw at it fine.
 
2013-07-11 10:00:27 AM
When I can read Twitter on my "smart" TV you know something has changed.
 
2013-07-11 10:02:03 AM

sxacho: Better components that don't need to be upgraded as often to run the software that most people use? I've had my main computer essentially unchanged for four years now. It doesn't play Crysis on max settings, but it handles everything else I throw at it fine.


Yep.  About once a few years I have to buy some upgrade for it (more HD space, more RAM, new Video Card, OS Upgrade) but I still use the same machine I bought 7 years ago.

I have been toying with the idea of a new processor, but I don't have time right now to dive into that.
 
2013-07-11 10:04:16 AM
The PC isn't dead. It changed shape. We have set top boxes, handheld computers and general purpose micro-controllers that are providing the same functions we used to rely on big desktops to do.

I think that it can rightly be argued that processing speed isn't terribly interesting any more. Desktop Graphics processing has improved to such a degree that it's impossible to distinguish a $500 product from a $1000 one without spanning across three displays' worth of pixels.

Instead, we care about access to data storage, the speed of that access and the degree of connectedness to useful inputs and outputs. And you can get all that stuff in a device that's the size of candy bar.

That's not a bad thing, people.

And to the people who love their desktops: No one is going to be taking them away. They still exist. But we do need to recognize that not everyone in the world wants or needs them.
 
2013-07-11 10:08:13 AM

Unoriginal_Username: I'm curious if this accounts for folks that build their own PC's and don't buy from the standard retailer.


No. Mostly because those of us that do buy parts and assemble our own computers aren't a big enough segment of the market to worry about. Your typical PC manufacturer (Dell, etc.,) isn't targeting us with their pre-assembled rigs.
 
2013-07-11 10:08:31 AM

Unoriginal_Username: I'm curious if this accounts for folks that build their own PC's and don't buy from the standard retailer.


Nope. Most people use their computers for internet access, playing media, and some light typing. Tablets can fulfill all of those roles easily. If you're the type of person who builds their own PC you probably want to do some more advanced stuff that a tablet can't handle well. So the PC market will shrink, since casual users are going, but not go away, because power users still need them.
 
2013-07-11 10:11:12 AM

Burr: sxacho: Better components that don't need to be upgraded as often to run the software that most people use? I've had my main computer essentially unchanged for four years now. It doesn't play Crysis on max settings, but it handles everything else I throw at it fine.

Yep.  About once a few years I have to buy some upgrade for it (more HD space, more RAM, new Video Card, OS Upgrade) but I still use the same machine I bought 7 years ago.

I have been toying with the idea of a new processor, but I don't have time right now to dive into that.


Same thing here. I'm going to build a new one in the next year or two, to up my RAM capacity and processor speed/quality, but that's about it. My 7 year old machine still rocked Skyrim very well, when I upgraded just the vid card, I was able to play at Max video settings just fine.
 
2013-07-11 10:11:31 AM
A PC can't do a whole hell of a lot more than they could 10 years ago unless you're a gamer, and in that case you should build your own. For a majority of people it makes sense to use a tablet for browsing and media, and a PC for stuff like word processing and spreadsheats.
 
2013-07-11 10:19:55 AM

Tremolo: A PC can't do a whole hell of a lot more than they could 10 years ago unless you're a gamer, and in that case you should build your own. For a majority of people it makes sense to use a tablet for browsing and media, and a PC for stuff like word processing and spreadsheats.


And computers are lasting a lot longer than they used to.  Five years ago, an eight-year old computer was pretty much obsolete.  Today, an eight-year old computer can do pretty much anything but play new high-level video games which, let's face it, 99% of PC users don't care about.  I think a lot of Americans are buying a tablet to supplement their PC, rather than to replace it.
 
2013-07-11 10:21:09 AM

Night Night Cream Puff: Unoriginal_Username: I'm curious if this accounts for folks that build their own PC's and don't buy from the standard retailer.

No. Mostly because those of us that do buy parts and assemble our own computers aren't a big enough segment of the market to worry about. Your typical PC manufacturer (Dell, etc.,) isn't targeting us with their pre-assembled rigs.


no. I would guess that their biggest market is businesses....and grandparents.
I do believe that the number of us that prefer to build is growing. It's getting easier to build them, and well, the ones coming from the big name companies are shiat.
 
2013-07-11 10:23:44 AM
Don't we get this thread like every 6 months?
 
2013-07-11 10:24:19 AM
In the end, tablets and PCs will merge.  Processors will continue to get smaller and more powerful, RAM density will increase, and before you know it, there will be a "tablet"--or is it a laptop?--with four cores, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of storage, and it looks like a tablet, but if you connect a monitor and keyboard, it acts like a laptop.  Which will be really, really cool.

The market is mutating.  The definition of "PC" is shifting.  If "end of the PC" means the end of the big gray box, well, that may be true.  Not sure who would mourn that. I haven't used a desktop in five years.

Tremolo: A PC can't do a whole hell of a lot more than they could 10 years ago unless you're a gamer, and in that case you should build your own. For a majority of people it makes sense to use a tablet for browsing and media, and a PC for stuff like word processing and spreadsheats.


I think your point is that the average user doesn't demand a whole lot more now than 10 years ago, but there are all kinds of people other than gamers who need modern high capacity PCs.  Even a spreadsheet can be very memory-hungry, depending on what you're doing.  If you're a developer and you need to install a cluster of hosts as VM images, it wasn't possible 10 years ago.  I don't remember the exact state of things, but I'm sure that no PC could handle more than 3GB of RAM, maybe it was only 2GB.

Today most laptops can go up to 8GB, some up to 32GB, and Windows 7 supports, I think, a maximum of 192GB.

Then there are the faster processors, and multiple cores, which move a lot of tasks from theoretically possible but impractically slow to yeah, we're there.

One other thing, if you ask me, the only reason you need to build your own PC is if you're a gamer.  Otherwise, buy a high-end laptop with an i7 processor, an SSD drive, and lots of RAM, and you have something that rivals/surpasses a server circa 2003.
 
2013-07-11 10:25:07 AM
I'm more interested in how tablet and smart phones are affecting laptop sales.

I've been a laptop buyer since the late 1990s; I doubt I'll ever buy another. My next computer will probably be an iMac or Mac Mini because I still need a computer for photo editing, and occasional Word and Excel usage.
 
2013-07-11 10:35:44 AM
Now for the rise of the glorious console gaming remnant races!
 
2013-07-11 10:36:18 AM

rugman11: Tremolo: A PC can't do a whole hell of a lot more than they could 10 years ago unless you're a gamer, and in that case you should build your own. For a majority of people it makes sense to use a tablet for browsing and media, and a PC for stuff like word processing and spreadsheats.

And computers are lasting a lot longer than they used to.  Five years ago, an eight-year old computer was pretty much obsolete.  Today, an eight-year old computer can do pretty much anything but play new high-level video games which, let's face it, 99% of PC users don't care about.  I think a lot of Americans are buying a tablet to supplement their PC, rather than to replace it.


That's probably mostly true.  But my seven year-old HP Pavillion has a tough time with YouTube and The Daily Show/Colbert Report.  Most of the time, Netflix streaming is okay.  And going back to it from my newer machine, the relative overall slowness in startup and web surfing is quite noticeable and excruciating.

But it's still servicable ... and that amazes the hell out of me.
 
2013-07-11 10:38:26 AM
My household used to have three laptops running. Two are now gathering dust while my wife and soon my son have switched to tablets.

I'm guessing that will be the norm soon. One PC per household for workhorse use with tablets and phones for casual use.
 
2013-07-11 10:45:09 AM

Kibbler: In the end, tablets and PCs will merge.  Processors will continue to get smaller and more powerful, RAM density will increase, and before you know it, there will be a "tablet"--or is it a laptop?--with four cores, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of storage, and it looks like a tablet, but if you connect a monitor and keyboard, it acts like a laptop.  Which will be really, really cool.


Sounds like you're describing a Surface Pro.

/will definitely get one when they refresh the processor w/Haswell
//typed this up on a Surface RT
 
2013-07-11 10:46:07 AM

Latinwolf: Don't we get this thread like every 6 months?


Yep. Just like clockwork. Tedious, tired, predictable clockwork.
 
2013-07-11 10:48:04 AM

IntertubeUser: rugman11: Tremolo: A PC can't do a whole hell of a lot more than they could 10 years ago unless you're a gamer, and in that case you should build your own. For a majority of people it makes sense to use a tablet for browsing and media, and a PC for stuff like word processing and spreadsheats.

And computers are lasting a lot longer than they used to.  Five years ago, an eight-year old computer was pretty much obsolete.  Today, an eight-year old computer can do pretty much anything but play new high-level video games which, let's face it, 99% of PC users don't care about.  I think a lot of Americans are buying a tablet to supplement their PC, rather than to replace it.

That's probably mostly true.  But my seven year-old HP Pavillion has a tough time with YouTube and The Daily Show/Colbert Report.  Most of the time, Netflix streaming is okay.  And going back to it from my newer machine, the relative overall slowness in startup and web surfing is quite noticeable and excruciating.

But it's still servicable ... and that amazes the hell out of me.


And I think the media stuff is what people are getting tablets for.  I mean, a Kindle Fire is running for $170 right now.  If your PC still does all the normal stuff you need (email, Word, Excel, web browsing) and you just want something to run media, it makes more sense to supplement the PC rather than replace it.
 
2013-07-11 10:49:05 AM

Kibbler: In the end, tablets and PCs will merge.  Processors will continue to get smaller and more powerful, RAM density will increase, and before you know it, there will be a "tablet"--or is it a laptop?--with four cores, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of storage, and it looks like a tablet, but if you connect a monitor and keyboard, it acts like a laptop.  Which will be really, really cool.

The market is mutating.  The definition of "PC" is shifting.  If "end of the PC" means the end of the big gray box, well, that may be true.  Not sure who would mourn that. I haven't used a desktop in five years.

Tremolo: A PC can't do a whole hell of a lot more than they could 10 years ago unless you're a gamer, and in that case you should build your own. For a majority of people it makes sense to use a tablet for browsing and media, and a PC for stuff like word processing and spreadsheats.

I think your point is that the average user doesn't demand a whole lot more now than 10 years ago, but there are all kinds of people other than gamers who need modern high capacity PCs.  Even a spreadsheet can be very memory-hungry, depending on what you're doing.  If you're a developer and you need to install a cluster of hosts as VM images, it wasn't possible 10 years ago.  I don't remember the exact state of things, but I'm sure that no PC could handle more than 3GB of RAM, maybe it was only 2GB.

Today most laptops can go up to 8GB, some up to 32GB, and Windows 7 supports, I think, a maximum of 192GB.

Then there are the faster processors, and multiple cores, which move a lot of tasks from theoretically possible but impractically slow to yeah, we're there.

One other thing, if you ask me, the only reason you need to build your own PC is if you're a gamer.  Otherwise, buy a high-end laptop with an i7 processor, an SSD drive, and lots of RAM, and you have something that rivals/surpasses a server circa 2003.


The limit for any 32bit system is 4gb. This includes the 32bit versions of Windows 7.

However you are correct that the upper limit for memory in Windows 7 64bit Professional & Ultimate Editions is 192gb
 
2013-07-11 10:51:43 AM

Tremolo: A PC can't do a whole hell of a lot more than they could 10 years ago unless you're a gamer.

Depends on what you are doing i guess. I would hate to have to run Revit or process 1080p video on a Pentium III.

 
2013-07-11 10:54:53 AM

Latinwolf: Don't we get this thread like every 6 months?


This thread is older than FARK itself

http://www.economist.com/node/449239

http://gizmodo.com/5301401/so-long-desktop-pc-you-suck
 
2013-07-11 10:59:27 AM

Gunderson: Latinwolf: Don't we get this thread like every 6 months?

This thread is older than FARK itself

http://www.economist.com/node/449239

http://gizmodo.com/5301401/so-long-desktop-pc-you-suck


Economist and Gizmodo?

media.tumblr.com
 
2013-07-11 11:00:37 AM

Copperbelly watersnake: I'm guessing that will be the norm soon. One PC per household for workhorse use with tablets and phones for casual use.


I think the trend will be for some kind of home NAS or central storage device. I've been selling systems to act as Plex Servers for a while because the single greatest bit of magic that I can perform just now is to have a box that easily addresses the need for central storage and distribution of media.

I can see that laptops are being ditched left and right in favor of tablets, while people who spend time creating content or doing homework often favor a machine with a real screen and input devices.
 
2013-07-11 11:03:53 AM
How long before piracy is somehow blamed?
 
2013-07-11 11:13:11 AM
I have a three year old custom built rig at home, which I use to host a Mumble server and game on, as well as work from home. I run a hosted DayZ server, and my buddies and I all hop in chat together and game on a regular basis, so I won't be going without a desktop for the foreseeable future. There will always be room in my house for a desktop. It just makes sense for a home office and gaming.

But aside from gaming, I really don't use it. Even when I work from home, I just RDP to my work machine, so it's basically a very expensive dumb terminal. I've got an iPad for couch browsing and ordering pizza, and the wife has an iPod Touch which she uses for email and web surfing.
 
2013-07-11 11:14:09 AM
FTA: "In addition, while efforts by the PC ecosystem to bring down price points and embrace touch computing should make PCs more attractive....

I do not want my desktop PC to have a touch interface.

img43.imageshack.us

I have a nice keyboard and a great trackball. I do not want to have to hold my arm out at full stretch to work a touch screen. I am not a McDonalds cashier.
 
2013-07-11 11:15:03 AM

Burr: sxacho: Better components that don't need to be upgraded as often to run the software that most people use? I've had my main computer essentially unchanged for four years now. It doesn't play Crysis on max settings, but it handles everything else I throw at it fine.

Yep.  About once a few years I have to buy some upgrade for it (more HD space, more RAM, new Video Card, OS Upgrade) but I still use the same machine I bought 7 years ago.

I have been toying with the idea of a new processor, but I don't have time right now to dive into that.


My main computer hasn't really been upgraded. I still have the same graphics card from 5+ years ago. My motherboard got replaced about 3 years ago due to it finally burning out. RAM can not be updated cause I am at my max RAM already. Looking to do a major upgrade soon. Pretty much reworking my entire PC.

Only thing that is regularly upgraded is my HDD. And even then, it is going from a 500GB to a few TB drives.
 
2013-07-11 11:34:50 AM

Chabash: So, all those people who 10-15 years ago bought PCs and continued buying PCs and would've bought a tablet instead are just buying tablets now? My world is upside down.


No, more like we're just reaching market saturation for PCs finally (and I think people are getting them to last longer while the economy is crap and parts and upgrades are cheap).
 
2013-07-11 11:37:13 AM
1. PCs last longer now so you don't have to buy new ones frequently

2. Functional program demands have been outpaced by moore's law and device performance, so a 2005 computer can run everything you'd need today.

3. The functional needs of low-use users have recently become better understood in a way that lets us package them all into smaller devices like tablets and phones, the whole point being that only someone that needs to type a lot or handle large amounts of data will need to buy a full computer.

That's about all there is to it.  People still need the relevant services, we've just found ways to distribute said services more reliably and at lower cost.  Albeit PCs might shoot back up if the console market for games finally kills itself like its E3 suicide note threatened.
 
2013-07-11 11:39:06 AM
At least for Android tablets, they really can't be a good PC replacement. The OS is just lacking. I have a Nexus 10 and Nexus 7. The 7 is okay, but the 10 is not worth buying. On the 10, the Chrome browser consistently has issues with web pages. And for a flagship Google tablet it just runs poorly.

Plus any app cannot have all the setting options a desktop application has.

My desktop PC hasn't changed much over the years, but I think it's time to get an SSD drive.
 
2013-07-11 11:39:09 AM
70 million, that's like NOTHING
 
2013-07-11 11:43:02 AM

Tremolo: A PC can't do a whole hell of a lot more than they could 10 years ago unless you're a gamer, and in that case you should build your own. For a majority of people it makes sense to use a tablet for browsing and media, and a PC for stuff like word processing and spreadsheats.


And motion graphics and animation. I couln't imagine doing that on a tablet. But you're right, for most people who use their computer for browsing and twitter and simple games, the table is fine. I have no use for them personally.
 
2013-07-11 11:43:35 AM
No way I would ever use a tablet for anything substantial.

Not typing on one, not ever.
 
2013-07-11 11:43:55 AM
My 5 year old PC does everything I need it to.  Why upgrade?
 
2013-07-11 11:45:37 AM
VIRTUALIZATION YOU DOLT!!!!

VMWare killed the need to buy a crapton of computers to run simple taks.
 
2013-07-11 11:46:14 AM

yves0010: Burr: sxacho: Better components that don't need to be upgraded as often to run the software that most people use? I've had my main computer essentially unchanged for four years now. It doesn't play Crysis on max settings, but it handles everything else I throw at it fine.

Yep.  About once a few years I have to buy some upgrade for it (more HD space, more RAM, new Video Card, OS Upgrade) but I still use the same machine I bought 7 years ago.

I have been toying with the idea of a new processor, but I don't have time right now to dive into that.

My main computer hasn't really been upgraded. I still have the same graphics card from 5+ years ago. My motherboard got replaced about 3 years ago due to it finally burning out. RAM can not be updated cause I am at my max RAM already. Looking to do a major upgrade soon. Pretty much reworking my entire PC.

Only thing that is regularly upgraded is my HDD. And even then, it is going from a 500GB to a few TB drives.


I never upgrade unless I am forced to.  I had a new video card because my old one burned out.  More RAM for CIV 5. Additional HDD because I got a virus and I was able to transfer all my photos and important stuff onto it before I wiped the OS HDD, and Windows 7 because XCOM demanded it (left XP on it though, just in case).
 
2013-07-11 11:47:53 AM
The workstation and gaming market are alive and well. But the need to upgrade is not what it was 10-15 years ago. Even a 3-5 year old PC will run pretty much everything.

What they are selling fewer of is email/facebook checkers. That has moved to phones and tablets. Which is perfectly fine and logical in my opinion.
 
2013-07-11 11:49:52 AM

doczoidberg: No way I would ever use a tablet for anything substantial.

Not typing on one, not ever.


No shiat, there's no tactile feedback. I suck at typing as it is. I'm a moron with phones and tablets.

But if you want to play Angry Birds, it rules.
 
2013-07-11 11:53:36 AM

Mugato: doczoidberg: No way I would ever use a tablet for anything substantial.

Not typing on one, not ever.

No shiat, there's no tactile feedback. I suck at typing as it is. I'm a moron with phones and tablets.

But if you want to play Angry Birds, it rules.


I do a lot of CAD work.  I am clicking on individual pixels all damn day.  No way I can get that kind of precision with my finger.
 
2013-07-11 11:54:31 AM

Flint Ironstag: FTA: "In addition, while efforts by the PC ecosystem to bring down price points and embrace touch computing should make PCs more attractive....

I do not want my desktop PC to have a touch interface.



I have a nice keyboard and a great trackball. I do not want to have to hold my arm out at full stretch to work a touch screen. I am not a McDonalds cashier.


Not to mention that someone else touching my screen is liable to cost them an arm.

Too old to overcome that impulse, and disinclined to do so in any case.
 
2013-07-11 11:58:13 AM

yves0010: Burr: sxacho: Better components that don't need to be upgraded as often to run the software that most people use? I've had my main computer essentially unchanged for four years now. It doesn't play Crysis on max settings, but it handles everything else I throw at it fine.

Yep.  About once a few years I have to buy some upgrade for it (more HD space, more RAM, new Video Card, OS Upgrade) but I still use the same machine I bought 7 years ago.

I have been toying with the idea of a new processor, but I don't have time right now to dive into that.

My main computer hasn't really been upgraded. I still have the same graphics card from 5+ years ago. My motherboard got replaced about 3 years ago due to it finally burning out. RAM can not be updated cause I am at my max RAM already. Looking to do a major upgrade soon. Pretty much reworking my entire PC.

Only thing that is regularly upgraded is my HDD. And even then, it is going from a 500GB to a few TB drives.


For any older machine, the best upgrade anyone can do is upgrade the hard drive to a SSD.

Then have only the OS and software on it, and use a regular hard drive for the data/video/music/pictures/files/etc.

I did it with my 3-4 year old main machine at home, and comparing it to my new i7 machine (with regular hard drive) here at the office, my old machine is as fast if not faster.

I'm considering getting and trying the new hybrids drives on a netbook and see how that goes.  The online info I've read is that they manage close to SSD speed for most things but with 5x the storage capacity at close to regular HD prices.
 
2013-07-11 11:58:20 AM
I predict a major increase in PC sales in the next few years. The new consoles will bump up the minimum specs on most games and software, which will see people needing to replace their aging PC hardware. In addition, new standards such as 4K video will also push people into buying new hardware.

Ironically, I am predicting doom for the new consoles coming out later this year. Yes people have been predicting the end of console gaming since the Apple II, but never have the advantages of gaming consoles been so muted. 20 years ago you could spend $2000 on a gaming quality PC easily, and have it barely meeting the system requirements within 18 months. Today you can buy a mid-to-high end PC for about $600 and you can go several years before even needing to upgrade to play the latest games, let alone replace it. On that same note, a PS4 or X1 will cost $400-$500 and if their declining reliability continues to trend, will lose both their cost and longevity advantages.
 
2013-07-11 11:59:13 AM

Burr: Mugato: doczoidberg: No way I would ever use a tablet for anything substantial.

Not typing on one, not ever.

No shiat, there's no tactile feedback. I suck at typing as it is. I'm a moron with phones and tablets.

But if you want to play Angry Birds, it rules.

I do a lot of CAD work.  I am clicking on individual pixels all damn day.  No way I can get that kind of precision with my finger.


Can you even use Photoshop with a tablet? I mean I know it'll run (probably) but wouldn't it be a pain in the ass?
 
2013-07-11 12:00:09 PM

likefunbutnot: The PC isn't dead. It changed shape. We have set top boxes, handheld computers and general purpose micro-controllers that are providing the same functions we used to rely on big desktops to do.

I think that it can rightly be argued that processing speed isn't terribly interesting any more. Desktop Graphics processing has improved to such a degree that it's impossible to distinguish a $500 product from a $1000 one without spanning across three displays' worth of pixels.

Instead, we care about access to data storage, the speed of that access and the degree of connectedness to useful inputs and outputs. And you can get all that stuff in a device that's the size of candy bar.

That's not a bad thing, people.

And to the people who love their desktops: No one is going to be taking them away. They still exist. But we do need to recognize that not everyone in the world wants or needs them.


This is a great post.
 
2013-07-11 12:00:48 PM

Burr: Mugato: doczoidberg: No way I would ever use a tablet for anything substantial.

Not typing on one, not ever.

No shiat, there's no tactile feedback. I suck at typing as it is. I'm a moron with phones and tablets.

But if you want to play Angry Birds, it rules.

I do a lot of CAD work.  I am clicking on individual pixels all damn day.  No way I can get that kind of precision with my finger.


Also, 3D navigation is much better on a desktop setup.  With a mouse, I have at least 3 inputs.  My hand (to move the cursor in the XY), index finger and middle finger, plus whatever my other hand is doing with the keyboard (so, add another 3 fingers maybe)  I can move around pretty smooth with that combination.  With just a touch screen,  I can awkwardly use two fingers, box selection and zoom is unreliable, and just clicking on something seems unnatural.

/now I sound like an old fart who says he can do stuff faster with a CLI then a GUI.
 
2013-07-11 12:04:20 PM

Mugato: Burr: Mugato: doczoidberg: No way I would ever use a tablet for anything substantial.

Not typing on one, not ever.

No shiat, there's no tactile feedback. I suck at typing as it is. I'm a moron with phones and tablets.

But if you want to play Angry Birds, it rules.

I do a lot of CAD work.  I am clicking on individual pixels all damn day.  No way I can get that kind of precision with my finger.

Can you even use Photoshop with a tablet? I mean I know it'll run (probably) but wouldn't it be a pain in the ass?


It appears that there is a mobile app for adobe Photoshop, but it doesn't have everything PS does.

/I'm cheap and use The Gimp anyway
 
2013-07-11 12:06:21 PM
My 5 years old PC (which was also pretty low end at the time) still runs fine on XP, granted it's only web browsing and word processing/spreadsheets. Haven't upgraded anything on it (actually took out the graphic cards and used integrated one instead because it failed a few years back).
There is just no reason to upgrade anymore until it breaks.
I also work on my 4 years old netbook much of the time, but I don't have any tablets.
 
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