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(USA Today)   NCAA is offended that anyone would think that there would be retaliation against a current student athlete joining the class action suit for a share of names and likeness revenue, but makes no promises others wouldn't retaliate   (usatoday.com) divider line 59
    More: Obvious, Ed O'Bannon, NCAA, student athlete, named plaintiff, legal case, Oscar Robertson, UCLA Bruins men's basketball  
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947 clicks; posted to Sports » on 11 Jul 2013 at 9:16 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-07-11 03:11:30 PM  

TheManofPA: I'm a little confused. After all the hurt and offended and how dare they, this paragraph shows up:

However, Curtner also said that while the NCAA has "no reason to believe that its member institutions, conferences, athletic departments or coaches would take any action against a current student-athlete who chose to participate in this litigation, we must again remind you that we represent only the NCAA and cannot speak (or sign stipulations) for NCAA schools, conferences, athletic departments or coaches who are not present before the Court.

Is this a case where the sarcastic sounding headline is true? It sounds to me like, he's offended and he is making no promises that the NCAA won't go after the kid....but the SEC would say dig up dirt and get him suspended.


The snark of the headline suggests it is true.  However the NCAA is saying it has no control over what it members do, but it would be profoundly stupid to suggest that they would act on a litigate in the case as that certainly would be brought before the court and reflect negatively on NCAA. They are offended that they would even suggest they would retaliate and go to length to show they haven't in the past, but ultimately, they have no control over how their members act and cannot bind them to an agreement that prohibits them from acting.
 
2013-07-11 03:26:04 PM  

ElwoodCuse: Hmmmm then maybe those top 1% shouldn't be forced into a system that exploits them to the tune of billions of dollars


I don't know a lot about how the NCAA works but what I do know is messed up. I remember seeing a Frontline episode a few years ago about how much money the NCAA makes off student athletes. Basically if you play any NCAA Division 1 sport the NCAA owns your likeness in perpetuity so even after you graduate the NCAA can put your picture or name on a shirt, or put a digital version of you in a video game and they don't have to pay you a cent. Which is kind of messed up when you think about since if someone say played golf or something in university and then went on to be a celebrity for something else, the NCAA could use their image to make money.
 
2013-07-11 03:34:30 PM  

MugzyBrown: ongbok:
The NFL had the NFL Europe, but with the NFL it was more of a physical development thing. Socially the idea of possibly having an 18 year old getting his lights knocked out by somebody 5-10 years older than him on a football field was frowned down on.

NFL Europe was not a developmental league. It was a separate pro-league used to try to expand the pressence of the NFL brand.  They did have practice squad players on some of the teams, but that was not its primary purpose.

A developmental league wouldn't have 25 years olds vs 18 year olds.  It would be all post-highschool athletes.  And it wouldn't need to be big business and draw fans.  It would be regional like minor league baseball.  You could get 5,000 to watch the future Giants play the future Jets on a Saturday afternoon.

It would most likely be a few well paid hot prospects mixed with minimum paid ($80-100k per season) lower level prospects... like baseball or hockey.

Like I've said several times, it works fine all around the world.. and in the US.. but it's just the NFL and NBA have made deals with the NCAA to use them as their farm system for free.


You don't think there would be guys in an NFL developmental league that have been in there for 5 or 6 years still waiting for their shot to be called up, just like in the MLB minors or the NBA D-League?
 
2013-07-11 03:40:05 PM  

mechgreg: Which is kind of messed up when you think about since if someone say played golf or something in university and then went on to be a celebrity for something else, the NCAA could use their image to make money.


They own your likeness AS AN NCAA ATHLETE, not your likeness. So unless people were just really clamoring for those photos of you golfing in college, they're not going to make a bunch of money off you.

Which makes sense; can you imagine trying to get permissions for things like those One Shining Moment videos? Oh, one guy in the video wants to get paid a million dollars for it...time to erase him from the video or eliminate that whole moment of history.

/people do not watch college sports for an individual athlete, on the whole
 
2013-07-11 03:58:57 PM  
I'm all up for creating an NFL developmental league and letting football players that have no interest in school try to get by on their insignificant salaries (as there's really no market for sub-NFL professional football - see: XFL, UFL, AFL, etc) that basically get them even less than they had in college, with worse facilities and opportunities to make it to the next level.

Football and basketball make money, which goes to fund the rest of the sports. College football and basketball would still be successful without the top players.
 
2013-07-12 08:33:21 AM  

A Fark Handle: probably just works in college athletic administration and the cognitive dissonance grows overwhelming after awhile.


No, but you can come up to my office on The Hill any time you want, and I can explain my perspective in a way that would be pretty sobering.
 
2013-07-12 10:05:08 AM  
kwame:   How many college football players can you name that have won a NC at two different schools?

Since coaches are allowed to break contract and move to another program whenever they want and players cannot without permission of the school and the one-year transfer rule, your question, like most of your utter stupidity in this thread is irrelevant and idiotic.

Stick Mark Emmert's wang back in your mouth and STFU.
 
2013-07-12 11:04:38 AM  

Coach_J: Stick Mark Emmert's wang back in your mouth and STFU.


Aww.  Poor thing's upset?
 
2013-07-12 04:17:40 PM  

Coach_J: Since coaches are allowed to break contract and move to another program whenever they want and players cannot without permission of the school and the one-year transfer rule, your question, like most of your utter stupidity in this thread is irrelevant and idiotic.


Rather than a system where athletes (let's not even pretend to add the student part if they're this type of player) can transfer every year to wherever they want to go, I'd like this remediated by rules similar to the players' rules.

If you get fired/cut, you can play for whatever team you want the next year.
If you go and take another job, if it's up/down one division, you can coach/play the next year (obviously you can't go down and then back up in one offseason).  Otherwise, you can't participate for another year. It would reduce coach-poaching.
But you gotta let the guys at the lower divisions move up if they have the opportunity (and while it would screw FCS teams like mine, it'd be great if some of the guys that get put down in the FCS level because of late HS injuries could get back in FBS and get a real shot in the draft).

/also, maybe there can be a special exception for coaches' alma maters, since that's important to a lot of people and most people tend to stay there if they can
 
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